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February 12, 1999 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1999-02-12

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;NATION/VORLD

The Michigan Daily - Friday, February 12, 1999 - 9

Protests
break out
about rape
ruling
ROME (AP) - Women lawmakers wore jeans
to Parliament yesterday and Italy's highest appeals
court was accused of sexism after ruling it is
impossible to rape a woman wearing jeans.
"If we go on like this, every woman that doesn't
wear a chastity belt will have the 'right' to be
raped," said Sonia Viale of Parliament's equal
opportunities commission.
The Court of Cassation ruled Wednesday it is
impossible to take off tight pants like jeans "with-
out the cooperation of the person wearing them.'
Baggy jeans aren't popular in Italy, and many
women prefer tight pants.
The decision overturned the 1998 conviction
of a 45-year-old driving instructor in southern
Italy, Carmine Cristiano, for raping an 18-year-
old student. A lower court had sentenced
Cristiano to two years and eight months in
prison, but the appeals court said the girl must
have consented to sex and sent the case back for
retrial.
"It could be seen as a manual for aspiring rapists,"
the Rome daily I Messaggero fumed in a front-page
story. "Jeans: An alibi for rape," read a sign held up
in Parliament by five jeans-clad lawmakers.
Alessandra Mussolini, a deputy of the rightist
National Alliance who led yesterday's protest, called

Dartmouth

board backs new
Greek system

By Jacob T. Elberg
The Dartmouth
HANOVER, N.H. - Dartmouth
Board of Trustees Chair Stephen
Bosworth '61 said Wednesday the
Trustees are prepared to weather any and
all opposition to their plan to eliminate
single-sex fraternities and sororities from
the college - and it appears the board
will have quite a fight on its hands, as
about 1,000 mostly Greek students gath-
ered in protest Wednesday night in front
of Dartmouth President James Wright's
house.
In an interview with The Dartmouth
on Wednesday, Bosworth echoed state-
ments Wright made Tuesday regarding
the firmness of the trustees' plans for
an overhaul of social and residential
life at Dartmouth.
'This is a decision which the Board
took with due consideration,' Bosworth

AP PHOTO
Female members of the Italian Lower Chamber of Parliament protest a ruling regarding the potential to
rape a women in Jeans during a Parliament session in Rome yesterday.

college's alma mater.
osworth said community input
play an important role in deter-
ing what the new system will
: like - a decision the trustees
expected.
We are confident that the affec-
s and loyalties of Dartmouth
ni rise above those of fraterni-
" Bosworth said.
People realize that there have
a changes to the world around
tmouth College and therefore
:mouth has to change."
osworth, who is the U.S. ambas-
)r to South Korea, also echoed
ght's statements regarding the
f for more beds on campu and
tional student-controlled social
,e.
though Bosworth said he did
have a plan as to what the new
social space
or spaces
should be
mof like, he said
d took it is possible
that move-
ment on the
construction
of a 'new
social space
ephen Bosworth could begin
f Trustees Chair in the fall.

the ruling "shameful" and said it "offends the digni-
ty of women."
"Women are already scared ofreporting rapes, this
just makes it worse," she said.
Massimo D'Alema said he could not com-
ment on the ruling as prime minister. But he
said, as a private citizen, he expressed "solidar-
ity" with the female lawmakers.
"We thank the court for having enriched
women's wardrobes with a new garment. To the
business suit and the little black dress, we can
now add the anti-rape outfit: a comfortable and
resistant pair of jeans," union official Stefania

Sidoli said.
Although many were upset at te ruling,
Federica Snider, a "7-year-old in Rome. under-
stood the reasoning behind it.
"It's impossible to rape someone wer1ng jeans.
You've got to really ov'erpower them " she said.
The ruling also drewv a tention to the makeup
of the ap peals court, wh i " 'ais 0 femaie jus-
tices and 410 men.
"Nothing can be done. Justice in the court is
in the hands of men, often elderly, with old
ideas," a veteran female justice, Simonetta
Sotgiu, told the newspaper La Repubblica.

said. "We are
fully behind
it."

mv :.:. Af r..:.

'Utah universities plan for Olympics

By Erin Steffey
The Utah Statesman
LOGAN, Utah - Though it may
seem far away, planning for the 2002
Winter Olympics has been underway
*for quite some time across the state
of Utah.
An estimated 3,500 athletes and
tens of thousands of spectators are
expected to stream into Utah to take
part in the Games. Many of Utah's
universities have already begun
planning for the arrival of the
Olympics, and some play important
roles in the Games.
The crowds and fanfare of the
Olympics will be present at the
Wniversity of Utah throughout the
Games. Utah will be hosting both
the opening and closing ceremonies
of the 2002 Olympics in Rice-Eccles
Stadium.
According to the universities
Website, "the university is tentative-

ly slated to receive from SLOC $8
million for the use of Rice Stadium
and associated parking lots, and to
receive $28 million for the use of the
Olympic Athletes Village."
It also hopes to attain educational
benefits from its involvement in the
Olympic Games. Coordinators are
working with students and faculty
"to enhance opportunities to learn
from and enjoy the presence of the
Olympics," according to the
Website.
Weber State University will also
be affected by the Olympics since
Ogden, Utah, is a major Olympic
venue. Pre-Olympic events have
already begun in Ogden, and the
U.S. Alpine Championships are
scheduled to take place at
Snowbasin Ski Resort in March.
Snowbasin is also the location for
some Olympic alpine ski events.
Sandy Sowerby, WSU's public

relations director and chairman of
the Northern Utah 2002 Committee,
said Weber State's Ice Sheet is going
to be used for curling.
Curling, which originated in
Scotland, is like "shuffleboard on
ice, but with more strategy
involved," Sowerby said.
WSU will follow the University
of Utah's example and not conduct
classes during the 2002 Olympics.
Weber will instead forego Spring
Break and take an extended break
during the Olympic Games, Sowerby
said.
The Salt Lake Community
College administration has dis-
cussed the possibility of not holding
classes during the Games as well,
but is still undecided. SLCC gymna-
siums may be rented, but the school
is otherwise unaffected by the
upcoming Games.
At Brigham Young University an

Olympics Operating Committee has
been created to handle preparations
for the Games. Carrie Jenkins, who
works for BYU Media Relations,
said the University hopes to involve
all of its departments in preparing
for the Games.
"Communications, nursing and
language will especially be
involved," Jenkins said.
Tours of BYU's campus will be
offered and the museum of art may
host a special exhibit during the
Olympics.
Unlike the U of U and WSU, BYU
will be in session during the
Olympics.
Many opportunities exist for those
who would like to volunteer for the
Olympics. An estimated 18,000 vol-
unteers will be needed to help with
the Olympic Games. Online applica-
tions are already available on
SLOC's home page.

W r i g h t ~'f Inoi isaU
told The
Dartmouth which the B
on Tuesday w --
th e in itiativ e ,,,/
"is not a ref- considerath
erendum on
these things.
We are com- Darmouth B
mitted to
doing this."
News of the trustees' plan spread
quickly throughout the Dartmouth
community Wednesday, especially
among members of Greek organiza-
tions, who reacted with surprise and
anger to the announcement.
Members of the Dartmouth Co-ed
Fraternity and Sorority Council met dur-
ing the evening and, after more than an
hour of debate, voted 23-12 to cancel all
Greek sponsored events for the upcom-
ing Winter Carnival weekend.
Following the meeting, members of
the council went to their individual
houses' weekly chapter meetings
where they informed Greek communi-
ty members of the decision.
At about 11 p.m. members of vir-
tually every CFSC organization on
campus made an impromptu march
to the Dartmouth-owned president's
house, where two Dartmouth Safety
and Security officers stood with
arms crossed in the driveway.
The gathering was without inci-
dent, and the crowd dispersed peace-
fully after singing three choruses of

"We 'r e
prepared to
put money where our mouths are,"
Bosworth said of the trustees.
"We'll do what has to be done to
make this vision a reality."
Bosworth said there was no par-
ticular event or incident which led
to the trustees' historic decision, but
said "a lot of people have been
unhappy.
Bosworth said there was no par-
ticular event or incident which led
to the trustees' historic decision, but
said "a lot of people have been
unhappy with the current system,
and they will welcome a chance for
innovation and change."
"It's been our feeling for some
time there's been a significant or
even substantial percentage of stu-
dents who have not felt that the cur-
rent system meets their desires or
their needs," Bosworth said.
Bosworth also commented on the fifth
of the trustees' principles - the one
which deals with the board's mandate to
eliminate "the abuse and unsafe use of
alcohol."

0GI$
loa
- Ste
oard o

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maintenance, and quality assurance. Call
913-0690.
COUNSELORS, WSI, LIFEGUARDS,
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Call Craig Pollack at 971-0990 for more info.
CRUISE SHIP EMPLOYMENT - Workers
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material. Pay based on experience, apply in
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fax resume to Matt Bennett at 734-741-8877.
DEJA VU'S LOVE BOUTIQUE is now
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sales, please apply within at 31 N.
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DIRECT SALES STAFF needed. $9/hr. to
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Friday February 26,1999
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Contact: 936-4727, for more info.
PERSONAL AIDES. SPECTRUM
Community Services is now hiring full and
part time positions to work with the
developmentally disabled adults in the
Washtenaw area. Applicants must be a
minimum of 18 years of age, posses a valid,
unrestricted Michigan driver's license, and
meet other hiring qualifications. Hiring
range $7.50-$9.00. For more information,
call 734-434-2676. Spectrum Community
Services is an equal opportunity, affirmative
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PRESTIGIOUS NORTHEASTERN
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interviews to be held on campus Feb. 25.
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www.trailsendcamp.com

SUIMMER EMPLOYMENT-College Pro is
currently seeking motivated, goal-oriented
students to fill our remaining management
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were $9,517. For more info, call 1-888-277-
7962, or www.collegepro.com
SWIMMING POOL service & construction.
Top pay for hard-working, self-motivated
people to work in the NW Detroit subs Must
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TECH/SALES
Should have working knowledge of
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Full time. Call 734-761-1698 Ext. 128 Mr.
Joseph or fax resume to 734-669-8485.
TOTAL VINYL PRODUCTS is looking for
students to work in a light industrial setting.
Evening hrs. avail. through April, 55+hrs.
mandatory during summer mths. Summer
wages can reach $1000/ wk. 734-485-7280,
Ask for Dwight.

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17

announc

26

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BUDDHIST SERVICE, meditation & talk.
All welcome. Sundays 5 p.m. Zen Buddhist
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FEMALE AND MALE undergraduate
students needed to participate in discussion
group, Thurs. Feb. 18th 4 P.M.(Female), & 6
P.M. (Male). $35 for participation. Corner of
Stadium & Washtenaw. Please call 973-1050
for more information--ask for Brenda.
LEARN THE HOTTEST club dances. U of
M Ballroom Dance Club is proud to present
Chachi from Chicago teaching Lindy Hop on
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