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February 04, 1999 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1999-02-04

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MEN'S NCAA
BASKETBALL
(2) DUKE 95,
(6) Maryland 77
(3) CINCINNATI 82,
Tulane 63
(4) Stanford 57,
-CALIFORNIA 55
(7) Auburn 76,
SOUTH CAROLINA 48

Miami (Fla.) 73,
(10) ST. JOHN'S 70
(19) INDIANA 71,
(12) Wisconsin 60
(20) MINNESOTA 75,
Illinois 63
NHL
HOCKEY
Colorado 5,
BUFFALO 3

New Jersey 4,
CAROLINA 1
MONTREAL 2,
Vancouver 1
WASHINGTON 10,
Tampa Bay 1
DETROIT 5,
NY Islanders 1
FLORIDA 5,
Toronto 2

cTfemSiuiiun Zil
SI'OR.w

Tracking 'M' teams
Have an itch to go to Indiana and don't know why?
Well, maybe its because both track teams will be in
the Hoosier State this weekend. Check out the
women's track team in Indianapolis and the men's
track team in Notre Dame.
Thursday
February 4, 1999 8 A ,

1999 Michigan football recruits

Carr,

Wolverines ink 24 recruits for 1999

Name
Askew, B. I.
Beard, Ryan
Bellamy, Ronald
Boebert, Norman
Bowman, Grant
Brackins, Phillip
Brooks, Greg
Brown, Andy
Butler, Tyrece
Cummings, Brent
Diggs, Carl
.Drake, Charles
t.eSuer, Jeremy
┬░Mignery, Andy
Morgan, Courtney
"Navarre, John
Orr, Shantee
Pape, Tony
Pearson, Dave
Russell, Fred
Shaw, Jon
Solomon, D.
Spytek, John
'Williams, Brandon

Position
RB
RB
WR
DL
DL
08
DB
OL
WR
RB
LB
RB
DB
QB
OL
QB
LB
OL
DL
RB
RB
OL
LB
DB

Height
6.3
5-10
6-1
6-5
6-3
6.3
5-11
6.3
65
5-11.
62
614
61
6.4
6-2
6-6
61
6-7
63
5-9
6-0
6-7
64
5-11

Wt.
210
203
175
251
258
190
175
285
200
180
220
185
177
225
318
220
220
290
240
182
190
260

Hometown (High School)
Cincinnati, Ohio (Colerain)
Houston (Cypress-Fairbanks)
New Orleans (Archbishop Shaw)
Peoria, Ariz. (Cactus)
Blacklick, Ohio (St. Francis De Sales)
Pigeon Forge, Tenn. (Gatlinburg-Pittman)
Gretna, La. (Archbishop Shaw)
Grand Ledge (Grand Ledge)
Indianapolis (Decatur Central)
Greenville (Belding)
Warren, Ohio (Hamilton)
Los Angeles (Westchester)
Holly Springs, Miss. (Holly Springs)
Hamilton, Ohio (Hamilton)
Los Angeles (Westchester)
Cudahy, Wis. (Cudahy)
Detroit (Denby)
Clarendon Hills, Ill. (Hinsdale South)
Brighton (Brighton)
Romulus (Romulus)
Coral Springs, Fla. (St. Thomas Aquinas)
Flint (Northern)

Following on heels of
By T.J. Berka and
Rick Freeman
Daily Sports Editors
After signing the top-rated fresh-
man class in the country last season,
one couldn't fault Lloyd Carr if this
year's class didn't match up..
Although Michigan's 1999 fresh-
man class isn't regarded as the best in
the nation - National Recruiting
Advisor ranked Michigan No. 10-
the 24 recruits still made for an effec-
tive encore.
And they're fast, too.
And as strange as it may seem for
speed to show up in the Big Ten,
Michigan's coach had an explanation.
"Big Ten teams look slow in the
late season," Carr said, explaining the
popular myth of three yards and a
cloud of dust away as a function of
the often soggy conditions of Big Ten
playing fields as the Midwest climate
deteriorates.

impressive

'98 class, Carr signs another top 10 class

"I'm extremely pleased with the
speed of this class," Carr said.
Also pleasing Carr was the way in
which this season's recruits did not let
the impressive credentials of last sea-
son's class - lured by Michigan's
national championship, scare them
off
This season's class is the largest
Carr has ever recruited at Michigan.
In each of his last three seasons, Carr
has used just 19 of the 25 scholar-
ships allotted by the NCAA. He
would not say if he plans to use the
25th and final scholarship.
The Michigan class of 1999 even
includes a Nebraskan, Brandon
Williams, of Omaha. Four Ohioans
signed on, although Ohio State
received a commitment from
Farmington Hills Harrison's Ricky
Bryant, the little brother of senior
wide receiver Kevin Bryant.
The class also includes six running

backs, led by top 100 prospect
Charles Drake. Most likely, some will
switch positions, Carr said.
Carr was particularly satisfied with
the way in which he filled Michigan's
needs at tackle. With 868 pounds of
offensive lineman spread among three
recruits at the position, Carr feels he
has the situation covered.
The offensive line drew two of the
four National Recruiting Advisor's
Top 100 prospects. Demetrius
Solomon, a Flint native, and Tony
Pape of Clarendon Hills, Ill. lead the
big guys up front.
But Michigan didn't fill its defen-
sive line, one of its biggest needs, as
effectively as they needed to. The
Wolverines nabbed three defensive
linemen - Norman Boebert, Grant
Bowman and Dave Pearson - but
didn't get the top blue-chip recruit
that they desired.
According to Bobby Burton, head

of National Recruiting Advisor,.
Michigan's lack of big time defensive
line help was a factor in Michigan's
class falling to 10th.
As a whole Michigan's recruiting
class was not filled with blue chipper
as only defensive back Jeremi
LaSueur, a Mississippi native, gar-
nered a top 15 rating at his position
according to the National Recruiting
Advisor.
SPRING UPDATE: Freshman speed-
ster Justin Fargas will miss spring
football season, while offensive line-
man Chris Ziemann will be back, but
only to practice.
"I think, I hope" he can practice*
Carr said.
Fargas is scheduled to get off his
crutches this week, Carr said.
Wide receiver Kevin Bryant and
fullback Aaron Shea are questionable,
with shoulder injuries. Bryant has
undergone surgery.

217 Pewaukee, Wis. (Catholic Memorial)
180 Omaha, Neb. (Central)

'M' wrestling looks
to join nation's elite
this weekend

Eschmeyer not
worthy of closer calls

By Chris Grandstaff
Daily Sports Writer
The Michigan wrestling team will
compete for intrastate bragging rights
and national respect this weekend
when they travel to No. 15 Michigan
State tomorrow night and No. 3 Iowa
on Sunday.
The Spartans look to exact revenge
for their 21-9 loss to Michigan in
December at Crisler Arena.
The ninth-ranked Wolverines hope
for a repeat of that performance on
Friday.
"We're going up there to put anoth-
cr knock on them," Michigan coach
Dale Bahr said. "But we can't think
it's in the bag."
The key matchup of the evening
will pit Michigan's sixth-ranked Joe
Warren against Michigan State's
third-ranked Pat McNamara in the
133-pound class. Warren's loss to
McNamara, 8-6 in their first meeting
was the only blemish on his dual-
meet record this year.
Other matches to watch include
1Michigan's sixth-ranked wrestler Otto
Olson's with Michigan State's No. 12
f Will Hill, and 20th-ranked Frank
SLodeserto battles sixth-ranked Nick
Muzashvili.
Olson has yet to lose in dual com-
petition and will try to climb over Hill
for the third straight time.
Still trying to recover from an
ankle sprain which has hampered him
for the last couple of matches,
Lodeserto will wrestle at less than his
normal level.
"Frank hasn't been wrestling at
full strength lately," Bahr said. "He's
probably only at about 70 percent."
As with all Michigan-Michigan

State matchups, there is a little more
at stake this Friday than at the average
Big Ten meet.
"It's always exciting to go up
against Michigan State," Michigan
coach Dale Bahr said. "No matter
what the sport, when you're going up
against Spartans it's all about brag-
ging rights."
Things get a little more difficult for
the Wolverines on Sunday when they
travel to Iowa City for their first meet
against the Hawkeyes since 1992.
Iowa has eight wrestlers in the top
25, a stat which is even more impres-
sive when you consider that seven of
them are in the top ten, including No.
I T. J. Williams at 149 pounds.
Despite all this, Iowa, the proud
owner of the last 25 Big Ten confer-
ence titles, may have their hands full
with this group of Wolverines.
"We're going to ding them as much
as we can," Bahr said. "We can defi-
nitely get half the matches, and if we
can get some extra points in a couple
of matches anything can happen.
"If you had told me at the begin-
ning of the season that we could go
into Carver-Hawkeye and win I
would have called you crazy. But the
thing is now we can."
Bahr, who was born in Iowa Falls,
Iowa, will have a chance to experi-
ence a homecoming of sorts. Bahr
earned a NCAA wrestling
Championship for state-rival Iowa
State in 1968.
"Iowa is a fun place to wrestle,"
Bahr said. "Wrestling is a major sport
there. The fans really appreciate good
wrestling, they may even give some
of our guys an ovation for a good
match."

N orthwestern's Evan
Eschmeyer has been the cen-
ter of a lot of attention in the
Big Ten as of late. The 6-foot-I1l
center has already made a name for
himself as one of the most dominant
post players in college basketball -
and most definitely the best in the
Big Ten.
Averaging 19.2 points and 10.7
rebounds per game, few can argue
his talent.
Eschmeyer
changes game
plans for his Big
Ten opposition,.
resulting in elab-
orate schemes to
limit his produc-
tive. In fact, it is PRANAY
the response of REDDY
other teams to Reddy or
Eschmeyer's tal- Not
ent that has
raised the com-
motion lately.
In short, teams have been fouling
him - a lot.
And when the Michigan men's
basketball team takes the court
tonight at Welsh-Ryan Arena to face
Northwestern at 8 p.m., you might
see the same thing.
Now Michigan coach Brian
Ellerbe might just call it good, hard
basketball - and he should.
Northwestern coach Kevin O'Neill
has been lobbying the referees after
late because of the abuse his star
center has been receiving.
Following Northwestern's loss to
Michigan State on Saturday, O'Neill
had a few choice words for the rest
of the Big Ten, likening the blows
Eschmeyer has been taking to pro-
fessional wrestling.
But then again, what else do you

expect when your roster boasts a
player of Eschmeyer's caliber? The
last time there has been this much
complaining about the lack of foulsw
called was when Dale Brown was
coaching Shaquille O'Neal down at@
Louisiana State.
I'm just going to say this once:
Evan Eschmeyer is not Shaquille
O'Neal.
Eschmeyer is a great player, but
that's it. He doesn't command the
respect O'Neill demands for him -
nor does any player in college bas-
ketball. O'Neill's comments have
been laced with more anger as of
late, in direct relation to
Eschmeyer's increased frustration
during Big Ten play.
Wait a minute - isn't that the job
of a basketball coach? Isn't a coach
supposed to take advantage of the
opposition's best weapon, frustrating
him by any means within the rule-
book?
Oh yeah.
It seems like that fact has been
lost upon Northwestern's coach. Th,
is Big Ten basketball, not the NBA.
The country's best players aren't
unfairly protected by the referees in
the manner that professional super-
stars are.
And that's what makes the college
game a great one. There is no pref-
erential treatment. When you take
the court, your actions determine
your success, not the backhanded
lobbying of referees by coaches.
So listen up Josh Asselin and Pete
Vignier. When you get out there
tonight, don't be afraid to body up
Eschmeyer. And when you have to
foul him, go ahead - despite what
Kevin O'Neill says.
- Pranay Reddy can be reached
via e-mail at pkr@umich.edu.

gw i
DAVID ROCHKIND/Daily
Peter Vignier and Chris Young have a goal - to stop Northwestern's Evan
Eschmeyer by any means necessary.

SJNl ET AA
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Men's track hits road for invite

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__
Y

By Ron Garber
For the Daily
This weekend the Michigan men's
track and field team leaves the friendly
confines of Ann Arbor for the first time
all year as they head to Notre Dame to
compete in the Meyo Invitational.
With all four meets this season pitting
Michigan against mostly in-state com-
petition, the Meyo offers the Wolverines
their first look at national competition.
Alabama, Illinois State, and host Notre
Dame will be competing.
It also offers the team its only chance
to run on an oversized track, which
should drop times significantly.
Field events are scheduled to begin at
9 a.m. with running events slated to
begin three hours later.
Michigan enters the weekend with a
good deal of momentum coming from

its last two performances. They won the
Red Simmons Invitational two weeks
ago and finished second to a strong
Eastern Michigan team last weekend in
the Michigan Intercollegiate.
A distinct pattern emerged from
those meets - a heavy reliance on the
spectacular performances of freshmen.
Is it reasonable to expect a drop-off in
performance since this is the freshman
class' first meet on the road?
"I don't foresee any problems;" said
head coach Jack Harvey said. "We have
a great freshman class. They've all
been really good leaders and I'm very
pleased with them."
Freshman sprinter Ike Okenwa feels
the same way. I'm not nervous to go on
the road. Most of us are really excited
to go and see some competition from
around the nation."

Okenwa's confidence certainly is
backed up by his recent performances.
Last Saturday, he won his second con-
secutive 60-meter.
This weekend, Ike will face Notre
Dame's Chris Cochran and Alabama's.
Jeremy Taylor in the 200. Cochran ar*
Taylor are coming off victories them-
selves and should offer Okenwa a tough
race.
Okenwa is not the only freshman
who won his event Saturday and
expects to face much stiffer competition
this weekend. Jeremy Schneider and
Oded Padan have a pair of Fighting
Irish hoping to crash their coming-out
parties.
Schneider, who won the 600, gets
his first real taste of national competi-
tion as he goes up against senior all-
See TRACK, Page 10A

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