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November 09, 1998 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1998-11-09

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48 - The Michigan Daily - SportsMonday - November 9, 1998

Michigan
.) Penn State

27

1
1
M
1
1
r

Michigan player of the game: The Michigan defense
After a horrible start to the season, the Michigan defense (led by coordina-
tor Jim Herrmann) has been the Wolverines' sparkplug. The defense has not
allowed more than 10 points since Michigan State scored 17 on Sept. 26.

0

Stat line: Pts. allowed Sacks
0 4

Fumbles
1

Interceptions
3

GAME STISTIMS
MICHIGAN

PASSING
Player
Brady
Henson
Totals
RUSHING
Player
Williams
Thomas
Fargas
Brady
Cross
Totals
RECEIVING
Player
Shea
Streets
Tuman
Thomas
Johnson
Knight
Williams
Campbell
Terrell
Thompson
Totals
PUNTING
Player
Vinson
Totals

C-A
17-30
1-1
1831
Att Yds
24 83
11 36
8 25
1 0
3 0
47 147
No. YS
3 58
3 38
3 28
2 46
2 18
1 25
1 5
1 3
1 3
1 0
18 224
No.
5
b

Yd's TD
224 2
0 0
282 1
Avg t4
3.5 11
3.3 12
3.0 5
-2.0 0
-1.7 C
2.9 12
Avg LA
19.3 26
12.7 16
9.3 13
28 41
9 9
25 25
5 5
3 3
3 3
0 0
12.3 41
Yds Avl
174 34.8
174 34.8

i
1
.2
5
0
0
Z
s
s
3
1
9
5
5
3
3
0
1

kit
1
0
0
TD
0
1
0
0
0
1
TD
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2

01

kg
8 41
A 41

KICKOFF RETURNS
Player No.
Fargas 1
Totals 1
PUNT RETURNS
Player No
Knight 1
Totals 1
DEFENSE
Player
Gold
Peterson
Hendricks
Hall
Jontes
Patmon
Ray
Sword
Feazell
Weathers
Brackins
Whitley
Renes
Schanski
Shea
Frysinger
Wilson
Sechler
1. Williams
Epstein
Jackson
Coleman
Totals
PASS DEFENSE
Player int
Peterson i
Patmon 1
Copenhaver 1
Whitley 0
Frysinger 0
Totals 3

Yds
29
29
Yd's
7
7
S10
8
6
1
4
2
3,
3
3
2
3,
2
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
49
Yd's
0
0
0
0
0
0

Avg
29
29
Avg
7

is
29
29
L9
7
7

Asst
1
0
1
2
3
1
2
0
0
0
1
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1s

TD
0
10
t
0
0
Tot
9
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
i
1
1
1
65
p TO
0
0
0
0 0
0
L 0

By Sharat Ragu
Daily Sports Writer
Against Penn State last season,
Michigan defensive back Daydrion
Taylor made a crushing tackle.
The hit, replayed across the coun-
try as one of the biggest of the sea-
son, ended Taylor's playing career.
He sustained a neck injury on the
play.
But before Saturday's game,
Taylor stepped onto the Michigan
Stadium surface again, flanked by
co-captains Jon Jansen and Juaquin
Feazell, and strode out to the middle
of the field.
As an honorary captain, Taylor
took part in the opening coin toss.
"It brought back a few memories
for me out there," Taylor said.
Taylor did win the toss for the
Wolverines, and Michigan went on to

win bigger things. Namely, the game.
But the toss had deeper significance
for the Wolverines than a mere pos-
session of the ball.
"It lets me know that they haven't
forgotten me," Taylor said.
Michigan coach Lloyd Carr, who
made the decision to name Taylor an
honorary captain, said that Taylor
has maintained a strong relationship
with the team despite being unable to
physically compete.
"This guy comes to practice every
day," Carr said. "I think our team has
a great love for that kid. It's good to
see him go on with his life. He's
going to graduate."
WHOA, NELLIE!: Michigan
Stadium. The Big House. The names
are synonymous and have been for
years.
Why? Because of one man - ABC

broadcaster Keith Jackson.
For over two decades, Jackson has
been the voice of college football.
With his descriptive commentary,
distinct, excited voice, Jackson was
well-loved by fans across the coun-
try.
Earlier this year, Jackson pro-
claimed that this will be his final
season broadcasting the biggest col-
lege football game of the week.
Saturday marked the final game
that Jackson will broadcast from the
stadium he nicknamed.
As a tribute, the Michigan
Marching Band's halftime show con-
cluded by spelling out "Thanks
Keith" across the field.
After band announcer Carl
Grapentine stated that the game is
Jackson's last in the Big House, the
111,019 fans turned toward the press

box, stood up and cheered for the
commentator. As part of the halftime
tribute, former Michigan coach Bo
Schembechler presented Jackson
with a jersey with "The Big House"
across the front and a Michigan foot-
ball helmet.
THE BLOCKING MAN: Michigan
linebacker James Hall is a master of
blocking kicks.
In the first quarter on Saturday,
Hall denied kicker Travis Forney
from connecting and breaking the
shutout early in the game.
The block was the third he has on
the season and the fifth of his career.
"I've got to give credit to Rob
Renes for getting good penetration
on the play," Hall said. "He made it
easier for me."
Hall blocked an extra-point
attempt by both Notre Dame and

Eastern Michigan this season, and
did the same against Iowa and
Washington State in the Rose Bowl
last season.
SHEA DAYs: Fullback Aaron Shea
caught the first and, therefore, game-
winning touchdown on Saturday - a
26-yard reception.
With that catch, Shea has two
career touchdowns - the other one
was against the Lions in Michigan
Stadium two seasons ago.
That time, it was a 25-yard recep-
tion.
If Shea manages to redshirt anoth-
er season just for fun, he will be able
to catch a 27-yard touchdown in
2000 against Penn State in Michigan
Stadium.
There's not really a record being
broken there, but it would be pretty
weird.

WARREN ZINN/Daily
James Hall was not to be denied in the first quarter of Saturday's game as he blocked this 34-yard field goal attempt and forced a fumble - all In the first 15 minutes.
One ear later, Talor still contributin to Wolverines
Sidelined senior who gave his career for the team against Penn State spends afternoon as honorary captain

L9
0
0
0
0
0
0

Br"Pit
0
0
0
1
0
1

Team Stats
First Downs
Rushes/Yards
Passing Yards
Offensive Plays
Total Offense
Return Yards
Comp/Att/Int
Punts/Avg
Fumbles/lost
Penalties/Yards
Time of Poss

MICH
18
47/136
224
78
360
36
18/31/1
5/34.8
1/1
10/81
34:50

PSU
13
35/106
94
61
260
61
8/26/3
4/36.0
2/2
5/44
25:10

Senior Williams starts at
tailback, gains 83 yards

PENN STATE

PASSING
Player
Thompson
Casey
Totals
RUSHING
Player
Eberly
Mccoo
Casey
Cerimele
Harris
Easy
Thompson
Totals
RECEIVING
Player
Jones
B.own
Cerimele
Eberly
Totals

C-A Yds
8-21 94
0-5 0
9-26 94

At
10
11
1
3
3
1
6
35
No.
3
2
2
1
8

PUNTING
Player1
Pidgeon
Toets
KICKOFF RETURNS
Player No.
Mccoo 2
Drummond 1
Luke
Totals 3
DEFENSE
Player
Morson
Arngton
Short
Brown
Fox
Mackln
Scioli
Adams
Fleischhauer
Jue
Boyd
Kurpeikis
King
Jones
Bell
Lee
Graham
Janes
Stankewicz
Daniels.
Gatten
Ttals

Vs
55
47
20
6
6
1
.29
106
Yds
45
34
10
5
94
4
4
YOa
33
17
16
94
Soo
10
6
5
6
3
4
4
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
0
1
1
1
1
1
62

Avg
5.5
4.3
20
2
2
1
4.8
30
Avg
18
16
7.5
5
11A
YdS
144
144
Avg
16.5
17.0
16.0
31.3

TD
0
0
0
L9
18
11
20
5
3
1
8
20
Lg
25
19
5
5
25

Int
2
1
3
TO
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
TD
0
0
0
0
0

By Mark Snyder
Daily Sports Editor
Outside the lockerroom after losing to
Minnesota, Michigan offensive coordinator Mike
DeBord scanned the group of assembled reporters
searching for answers about Michigan's minus-
23-yard rushing effort.
One week later, after the Wolverines methodi-
cally, but effectively, controlled the ball on the
ground and in the air, excuses were no longer nec-
essary.
"We ran the ball finally the way we're capable of
running," said Michigan coach Lloyd Carr, who
improved his record against Top 10 teams to 8-0.
"We played with a tremendous amount of intensi-
ty today and all week in practice. This was the way
that these guys are capable of playing."
"These guys" are players who have taken inor-
dinate amounts of abuse. On the sports pages in
newspapers in Michigan and Pennsylvania last
week, discussion centered on the inability of
Michigan's backs to move the ball for positive
yardage against an Minnesota's average Big Ten
defense.
No such problems existed on Saturday.
With Clarence Williams getting the starting call
at tailback, Michigan sought to try something new.
Williams fumbled in a couple crucial situations
earlier this season, extending Carr to the end of his
patience rope. Although not at Carr's request,
Williams spent one whole game carrying a foot-
ball on the sideline and after Anthony Thomas and
Justin Fargas were ineffective last week, Williams
was the choice.
"I spent a lot of time (last) Monday talking to
the older guys" Carr said. "Clarence had a good

"We ran the ball
finally the way we're
capable of running.
This was the way
these guys are
capable of playing."
- Lloyd Carr
Michigan football coach
career at Michigan, but didn't play as well as he
would have liked (this season.) I asked him what
his attitude was and he said, 'I want to win.' A lot
of guys up front had confidence in him."
The confidence of his coach improved relations
on the sidelines, but Williams almost did his part
to relinquish the confidence. On a monster hit by
Penn State's Butkus boys - linebackers Levar
Arrington and Brandon Short - Williams
coughed up another fumble. But this time the
coach was ready to let him off the hook.
"The fumble was nothing but a great defensive
play" Carr said. "He made up his mind to run hard."
That extra effort - an attribute Carr contended
was missing the week before - gained Williams
86 hard-fought yards as he led the team to 136 on
the ground.
"It's fun to get out there and be with my team-
mates," Williams said. "I decided to get out there
today and contribute."

i.

Avg Kg
36.0 47
36.O 47

LS
24
17
16
35

TD
0
0
0
0

AM
2
3
4
0
3
1
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
19

Tot
12
9
9
6
6
5
4
4
4
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
1
1
63

MP~AART MYERS~/Daily
After getting the start at talback, Clarence Williams re-established Michigan's running game against
Penn State. He ran for 83 yards of the team's 136 yards on the afternoon.

Ray's return fires up 'M' defense *

Big Ten Standings
Team Conf. Overall

Wisconsin
MIchIgan,
Ohio State
Purdue
Penn State,
Michigan State
Iowa
Illinois
Minnesota,
Indiana
Northwestern

6-0
4-2
3-2
3.2
2-4
2-5
1-5

90
7-2
8-1
6.4
6-2
54
3-6
3-7
3-6
28

By Sharat Raju
Daily Sports Editor
Marcus Ray was listed second on the depth chart at free safe-
ty behind DeWayne Patmon, but Ray definitely saw more play-
ing time than most second-stringers.
After returning from his 'half-season' suspension, Ray took
part in a mammoth defensive effort, shutting out Penn State.
The preseason All-American played early and often, starting
on the second defensive series.
"It felt real good to go out and play" Ray said. "It was great
to go out there with the fellas."
The intensity and natural football instincts Ray displayed last
season came forth as soon as he entered the game. Ray defend-
ed a pass that fell incomplete on his first play. On the very next
play, Michigan linebacker James Hall sacked Penn State quar-

After recovering a fumble by Michigan tailback Clarence
Williams, Penn State had a first down on- Michigan's 20 yard
line. Some unimaginative playcalling by Joe Paterno led to an
eventual first-and-goal on the five yard line.
Michigan's 10-man defensive front thwarted Penn State tail-
back Eric McCoo on three consecutive plays. On fourth down,
the Lions lined up to kick a field goal as the first quarter ended.
When the second quarter began, however, the Lions lined up
to run a play. Thompson handed off to fullback Aaron Harris
on a typical dive play. Michigan linebackers Sam Sword and
Ian Gold, along with strong safety Tommy Hendricks, broke
through the line and converged on Harris, stopping him short
of the endzone. Goal line stand complete.
"It was a will of manpower out there," Sword said.
The stand was reminiscent of a similar one the Wolverines

r ~a - u ~uN w&rinin~ ~'~u .

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