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October 07, 1998 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1998-10-07

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NATION/WORLD

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 7, 1998 - T

Urgent steps
needed to fix
orld economy . -

Dutch
want to
know

a.
a.

.:

WASHINGTON (AP) - President
Clinton urged world economic powers
yesterday to take "urgent steps" to
limit the turmoil that has roiled global
markets. He said the violence of
boom-and-bust cycles must be con-
tained.
Addressing financial officials from
182 countries at the International
Monetary Fund's annual meetings,
Clinton used his strongest language
yet to describe the need for all coun-
tries to cooperate to calm an econom-
ic crisis that has sent U.S. stock prices
plummeting and pushed one-third of
the world into recession.
"Today the world faces perhaps its
most serious financial crisis in half a
century," Clinton said. "We must
take urgent steps to help those who
have been hurt by it, to limit the
reach of it and to restore growth and
confidence."
Behind the scenes, Clinton admin-
istration officials worked feverishly
on a number of fronts. The White
House confirmed that preliminary
discussions were under way on an
emergency economic summit in
London next month, suggested by
British Prime Minister Tony Blair.
Meanwhile, Treasury officials
worked to put together an emergency

rescue package of around $30 billion
for Brazil, hoping to keep Latin
America's largest economy from
being the next to fall victim to pan-
icky investors.
Argentine President Carlos Menem
said negotiations on the loans for
Brazil could be completed by next
week and suggested the emergency
lines of credit could be expanded to
help other Latin American countries
facing difficulty.
The Clinton administration also
released a study showing the state-by-
state impact that economic problems
already have had on American manu-
facturers and farmers, hoping to
increase pressure on Congress to
approve $18 billion for the IMF
before lawmakers go home.
But Republican opponents in the
House insisted the IMF support
will not be approved unless the
administration accepts restrictions
it so far has rejected that would tie
the increased money to a major
overhaul of the agency. Critics say
the IMF badly bungled the Asian
crisis by imposing too much auster-
ity and pushing fragile economies
into recession.
Clinton, in his remarks, renewed his
call for Congress to approve the IMF

AP PHOTO
President Clinton talks with Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin during a joint meeting of the International Monetary Fund
and the World Bank yesterday in Washington.

money, saying, "There is no excuse
with refusing to supply the fire
department with water while the fire
is burning."
He called for finance officials to
continue working on proposals
endorsed Monday by a special 22-
nation conference that are aimed at
stabilizing the vast flows of interna-
tional money.
"We must address not only a run on
a bank or firm, but also a run on

nations," Clinton said. "We simply
must find a way to contain the pattern
of boom-bust on an international
scale."
And he called on Japan to invigo-
rate its economy, something his
administration believes is essential for
lifting other Asian nations.
In Tokyo, Japanese Prime Minister
Keizo Obuchi announced plans for a
bigger economic stimulus package
after officials said the country, already

in its worst recession in 50 years, was
facing deepening problems.
Both IMF Managing Director
Michael Camdessus and World Bank
President James Wolfensohn pledged
yesterday to undertake major changes
in their agencies because of the sever-
ity of current threats.
"It would be perhaps too dramatic
yet to talk of global recession, but the
evidence of the risks calls for immedi-
ate action," Camdessus said.

NATO closer to airstnkes against Kosovo

w

BtLGRADE, Yugoslavia (AP) -
Moving closer to NATO airstrikes, the
United States told Yugoslav President
Slobodan Milosevic yesterday that he
has failed to show the West he really
means to end his harsh crackdown in
Kosovo province.
U.S. envoy Richard Holbrooke met
Milosevic for the second day yesterday
aftef visiting the southern Serbian
Wince, where Yugoslav forces were
W ling ethnic Albanian rebels seeking
independence.
In Washington, President Clinton
said Holbrooke was telling the
Yugoslav leader that NATO is prepared
to act if Milosevic fails to honor U.N.
resolutions ordering him to withdraw
from areas of conflict and allow a polit-
ic'al settlement.
He warned that, unchecked, Serb vio-
* cc in the province could lead to
instability throughout the region.
"The stakes are high," Clinton said.
"The time is now to end the violence in
Kosovo."
After meeting with ethnic Albanian
political leaders in Kosovo, Holbrooke
said Serbian security forces still main-
tain a strong presence.
"U.S. diplomatic observers are doing
a terrific job bringing us information,
and the information they're bringing is
* good," Holbrooke said.
Milosevic's seven-month crackdown
against the secessionists has killed hun-
dreds, left tens of thousands of ethnic

Albanians homeless and led to growing
resolve among NATO allies to stop the
bloodshed by striking Yugoslav army
targets if necessary.
Kosovo is a province of Serbia, the
main republic of Yugoslavia. But ethnic
Albanians form 90 percent of the 2 mil-
lion-strong Kosovo population, and
most favor self-rule.
Hours after Holbrooke left Kosovo
for Belgrade, reporters saw about 100
Yugoslav military vehicles of all sorts
ranging from armored personnel carri-
ers to trucks loaded with troops -
moving outside Kosovo in an apparent
show of Milosevic's compliance with
international demands.
Additionally, state-run Serbian TV
claimed that all Serbian special police
units were pulled out of the province -
a key international demand.
Defense Secretary William Cohen
told Congress a pullback of troops in
Kosovo by Milosevic was not enough to
ward off NATO attacks. Airstrikes
might be followed by some "interna-
tional presence" on the ground, he said.
If more Serb forces don't pull out of
the province, NATO intervention "will
become inevitable," French President
Jacques Chirac said.
But Yugoslav government
spokesman Miodrag Popovic told
Associated Press Television News that
the complete withdrawal of Yugoslav
troops from Kosovo is out of question.
"Who in the right mind would do so?

Is there a country in the world that
would do so, especially with an armed
rebellion on their hands?" Popovic
asked.
Milosevic told Holbrooke in talks
Monday night that his government is
willing to seek a "political solution" to
the crisis. But he also called the NATO
threats against his country "a criminal
act"
Holbrooke, who negotiated the 1995
agreement that ended the Bosnian war,
was dispatched to the Yugoslav capital
of Belgrade in what appeared to be a
last-chance diplomatic effort.
NATO officials say they are ready to
launch airstrikes. No decision is expect-
ed until tomorrow, when NATO ambas-
sadors meet in Brussels.
But Russian Foreign Minister Igor
Ivanov told the Interfax news agency
that Russia, a staunch ally of Serbia,
would use its veto to stop any move to
approve airstrikes on Yugoslavia by the
U.N. Security Council, which was to
discuss Kosovo late yesterday.
The United States is trying to get
Milosevic and the ethnic Albanians
to agree on a deal that would defer
for two or three years a decision on
whether Kosovo would separate from
Serbia. But the ethnic Albanians
have refused to negotiate with
Milosevic, and Secretary of State
Madeleine Albright voiced skepti-
cism Milosevic would adhere to any
such plan.

cargo
AMSTERDAM, Netherlands (AP)
- In the shadow of towering apartment
buildings, a living monument to vic-
tims of the worst Dutch air disaster
bears this inscription: "The Tree That
Saw Everything."
Six years later, investigators are
struggling to uncover what no one can
see - the cause of chronic illnesses;
that have plagued the neighborho4
and its rescuers since the crash of an
Israeli cargo jet.
New disclosures the plane was carry-
ing a chemical that can be used to pro:."
duce the deadly nerve gas sarin have'
reignited demands for the truth - and.
renewed speculation over what th.
Israelis intended to do with the material,
"Once and for all, we must put a '
end to the disaster. The suffering ha&
lasted too long" Hannah Belliot, who
heads the neighborhood council, said y
Sunday in a memorial service near>
trees that survived the inferno.
Forty-three people were killed t!
Oct. 4, 1992, when the Israel-bound
Boeing 747 cargo jet lost its twi"_
right engines and smashed into a .
story apartment block shortly after
takeoff from Amsterdam's Schiphol
Airport.
While the cause of the crash was'..
determined to be a design flaw, its
cargo has been a nagging mystery to
the scores of residents and rescue,
workers suffering from chronic health
problems. =.
Last week, the Israeli government
confirmed what many had suspected
after years of official denials: Th :
plane was carrying dangerous cargo.
Up to 50 gallons of dimethyl
methylphosphonate, an ingredient used
in sarin, many pesticides and in anti-
retardants were destined for the Israe'
Institute for Biological ResearchOr"
suburban Tel Aviv, the Israelis dis
closed.
Recent reports have said Israel was
making chemical and biological.
weapons at the institute; the Israeli govr -
ernment has not commented on thoset
claims. The Dutch government, mean-
while, has promised a fresh parliamen-'
tary probe.
Those suffering from health prob'
lems say knowing exactly what was ii
the belly of the jet is their only hope for,
recovery.
"I can't get it out of my mind," said
ambulance driver Henk Post, a para-
medic dispatched to the crash site in te
low-income, heavily immigrant
Bijlmer neighborhood.
Post arrived within minutes of the-
early evening crash and worked until
the next morning - all while wearin
no special protective gear. Three years
later, he began suffering health prob'
lems, including chronic fatigue and
muscle aches. He also weeps easily and
suffers bouts of depression.
"He's so emotional," said Post's 22-
year-old daughter, Bianca. "He's differ-
ent. He's not my father anymore"
Post said doctors are at a loss over
how to treat him.
He's not alone. Doctors in Bijlmer
say some 300 people have suffered
health problems since the crash, includ-
ing nervousness, stress, chronic
fatigue, pain and drowsiness.
"Mv whole body is a mess. Therea
all kinds of weird things going on'sd
Ed Steur, an auto mechanic who helped
evacuate the area and now suffers from
bronchial problems and muscle aia
"so bad that I can't do anything :any
more."
Steur is angry at the Israeli and

Dutch governments for keeping the
plane's cargo a secret. Over the years,
officials have said the plane carried a
small amount of military equipment
one newspaper report said it was carry-
ing Sidewinder missiles.
AMERITECH
Continued from Page 1
is the faster Integrated Services Digitat
Network (ISDN) Dial-in.
ISDN, at 128K bytes per second, is
not as fast as Ethernet or ADSL and 'is
not very popular, but it is available,"
Palms said.
But ISDN can reach to areas sur.-,
rounding Ann Arbor, such as Chelsea,
Palms said.
ADSL is now the third form of
Internet access that the University
offers and is known as UMnet Wired.:,'
The benefits of the ADSL expansion
are enormous, Ameritech officials said.
"Students today depend on the

AP PHOTO
Ethnic Albanian refugees crowd around a radio for the lastest newn on possible
NATO strikes yesterday near Kisna Reka in Yugoslavia.

Cults aim to attract students

OVERNIGHT CHILD
needed. 327-9775.
WANTED MOTHER'S HE
in caring for 2 small children.
req. Call Allison @ 734-971-

care assistant ABSOLUTE SPRING BREAK.... "Take 2"
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Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas, Florida, Padre!
ELPER to assist Free Meals, Parties and Drinks. Lowest
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WANTED: DEPENDABLE FUN
loving babysitter for 15 mo. old girl for
occasional eves. Ref. a must. Call 213-8301.

ALUMNI NEEDS SEVEN tickets near each
other for any upcoming football game.
Leave message 810-315-6901.
LOOKING FOR 2 Penn State football tix.
Call 741-9021.
SPRING BREAK-Cancun, Florida, Jamaica,
South Padre, Bahamas, Etc.. Best Hotels,
Parties, Prices. Book Early and Save!! Earn
Money + Trips! Campus Reps/Organizations
Wanted. Call Inter-Campus Programs 1-800-
327-6013. www.icpt.com
WANTED: 5 TICKETS together for Oct.
24th Michigan-Indiana football game. Please
call days 401-841-4475 and evenings 401-
849-0739.
_ anniiouncements

CULTS
Continued from Page I
"Go to a relevant Website and see what people have to say,
both critics and supporters'LaBounty said.
One of the Websites LaBounty suggested,
http://wwwskepdic.com, gives a complete listing of question-
able groups under the keyword "cults."
Although DPS officials said they have no knowledge of
any dangerous groups on campus, students aren't so sure.
"You always see the people out on the Diag," LSA first-
year Adam Slater said. If they are cult-like groups, "the
University should take actions to stop them, or make students
more aware of what's going on."
LSA first-year student Kristin McCasey said she would
like to see the University make more information available to
students.
"I'm not really informed about cults. I think it would be
interesting to know" about them, McCasey said.
Although freedom of speech and freedom of religion rights
prohibit public universities from banning representatives of
certain groups on campus, other universities have focused
their efforts on educating the student population.
At Hamline University, LaBounty teaches a class on

Cult tactics
Cults use a wide variety of tactics in their attempts to
recruit new members.
1. Deception: A group representative won't identify the
fact that they are recruiting for a group.
2. Control: The dangerous group may manipulate one
into group dependency for identity and support.
3. Confession and Guilt: Confessions may be used to
convince the person of how sinful the person was
before they came into the group.
4. Rejection of Family, Friends and Society: The group
will try to cut one off from outside influences.
5. Obedience: The dangerous group will expect total
obedience.
6. Total Commitment: The group expects one to spend
all assets, both financial and otherwise.
- Rick Hill, coordinator of interfaith ministries at
James Madison University
manipulative psychology. Other universities, including
Madison University, have offered informational lectures on
the subject of cult awareness.

FLORIDA SPRING BREAK
Sdpiper-Beacon Beach Resort. Panama
Beach, FL. From $159 per person. 3
pools, 1 indoor pool/lazy river ride. Huge
beachfront hot tub. Tiki bar, home of the
world's longest keg party, free draft beer all
week w/ cover. Suites up to 10 people. Free
info www.sandpiperbeacon.com. 800-488-
8828.
AAA! EARLY SPECIALS! Cancun &

Y2K
Continued from Page i
"Our intent is to highlight the prob-
lem and put as much pressure on the
Education Department ... as possible,"
he said. "On sometof this we won't
actually know what will happen until

Pamela Fowler, director of the Office
of Financial Aid, said if students do not
receive their loans in time, there will be
no need to panic in the short run.
"We will always let students register
and always let them take classes,"
Fowler said. "The question is how long
could we support students without

Information Technology Division's
year 2000 project coordinator, said
there are four potential solutions to
the problem.
"You can fix it, replace it, work
around it or obsolete it," Thiele said. If
the Education Committee is not able to
comply on time, "there could be a

I

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