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October 01, 1998 - Image 16

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The Michigan Daily, 1998-10-01

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2B- The Michigan Daily Weeke Magazine - Thursday, October 1, 1998

0

The McNgan Daily Weeken$

Didyoknw
Graduating with a liberal arts degree and not sure you'll ever find a job? Don't worry, you can still be president of
the United States. Only nine of our nation's 42 commanders-in-chief didn't spend time on a campus and the last one
to fit the description did so more than four decades ago. Former White House occupants who never earned even a
Bachelor's degree are:

George Washington
Andrew Jackson
Martin Van Buren
Zachary Taylor
Millard Fillmore

Abraham Lincoln
Andrew Johnson
Grover Cleveland
Harry S. Truman

Soure: "The George Magazine Book of Presidential Lists "

. i

Saturday
Beethoven Festival Part 2 The Ann
Arbor Symphony Orchestra, with con-
ductor Samuel Wong, will perform
Beethoven's Romance No. 2 in F,
Symphony No. 2 and Leonore Overture
No. 3 in this performance of the festi-
val. 8 p.m. $16-29, $4 discount for
students. (734)-994-4801. T
Hootle & the Blowfish Come hold their
hands and let them cry. The State
Theater, 2115 Woodward Ave., Detroit.
(313) 961-5450, ext. 1.
Jazodity Popular local ska band, The
Articles, opens for jazz band. 9:30 p.m.
The Blind Pig, 208 South First St. 996-
8555.
Man or Astroman Robots programmed to
rock. 9 p.m. The Magic Stick, 4120
Woodward Ave., Detroit. (313) 833-9700,
ext. 2.
Viktor Ullmann Centennial Celebration
A concert version of the chamber
orchestra "Der Kaiser von Atlantis,"
from 1944, will be performed.
McIntosh Theatre, E.V. Moore Bldg.
School of Music. 8 p.m.
THEATER
Avenue X: an a cappella musical See
Thursday. 8 p.m.
On Golden Pond See Thursday. 8 p.m.
ALTERNATIVES
Stand-Up Comedy See Thursday. 8 and
10:30 p.m.

Co.urtesy ofU UniArtst
"Ronin" Director John Frankenhe'mer
likes what he sees. He and the movie's
cast hope you will, too.
Mozart, Schumann, Beethoven Debussy
and others. Kerrytown Concert House,
415 North Fourth Ave. 4 p.m. $10,
Students $5. 769-2999.
Martin Sexton Atlantic recording
artist, you may have heard of him. 7
and 9 p.m. The Ark, 316 South Main
St. 761-1451.
They Might Be Giants Didn't they seem
nice in the interview? Besides, "Particle
Man" will be there, so should you.
Michigan Theater. 668-8480.
Viktor Ullmann Centennial Celebration
Chamber music from Viktor Ullmann's
1943-44 years will be performed. Britton
Recital Hall, E.. Moore Building, School
of Music. 4 p.m.

Pendleton Room.
Open Mic Offers a chance to all to read
and discuss literature. Borders. 11 a.m.
Patricia Pasick The author of "Almost
Grown: Launching Your Child from High
School to College," discusses and signs
her book. First-year students, tell your par-
ents. Barnes and Noble, 3245
Washtenaw. 2 p.m.
Tie's Hot Sauce Tasting You read the
story on page 6, now try it for yourself.
Tio's Mexican Cafe, 333 E. Huron St.
Noon - 4 p.m.
Monday
CAMPUS CINEMA
Spike & Mike's Classic Festival Of
Animation '98 See Friday. Mich. 7 p.m.
PI (1998) See Friday. Mich. 9 p.m.
MUSIC
Guster Yeahl Frat-rocklll 8 p.m. The Blind
Pig, 208 South First St. 9968555.
Brenda Kahn Singer/songwriter special-
izes in acoustic entertainment. 9 p.m.
Arbor Brewing Company, 114 E.
Washington St. 213-1393.
Son Aiot Music writer Gabe Fajuri's
favorite country-rock band plays acoustic
set. 7:30 p.m. The Ark, 316 South Main
St. 761-1451.
University Symphony Band Performing
with funky computerenerated music. 8
p.m. Power Center, 21 Fletcher St. $6
students. 763-3333.
ALTERNATIVES
Feed the Poets Featured poets this
month are Joe Matuzak and Josie Keams,
and the audience can participate with an
open mic. Del Rio Bar, 122 W. Washington
St. 2:30 p.m.
Ed Hhsch Poet reads from "On Love," his
fifth collection. Shaman Drum. 8 p.m.

JESSICA IOM 4DSy
Many Humanities professors think Shaman Onm endches the campus community-
Many students are just sick of waiting In long Ine. to buy only new books.
Professors, -students
dliffer on value of --
Shmn Dru

THEATER

Sunday

MUSIC

Avenue X: an a cappella musical See
Thursday. 2 and 7 p.m.
On Golden Pond See Thursday. Ann Arbor
Civic Theatre Playhouse 2275 Platt Road.
2 p.m.
ALTERNATIVES

F

By-rmmn Neeh
Day S prr
While few would argue shopping at
Shaman Drum's texbook and retail sales
stores is definitely a different experience
- but exactly why its out of the ordinary
depends on who you talk to.
A number University profissors say
the store is a valuable part of the com-
munity with its sophisticated poetry and
literary readings, off-the-beat-path selec-
tion ofbooks and anti-cooperate attitude.
But some students say they are tired of
waiting in long lines to pay too much for
competition-free textbook sales.
Those who help run Ann Arbor's
"independent" bookstore are not at all
divided - agreeing across the board
that it is the support of the University
community and professors, many of
whom only order books through
Shaman Drum, that have kept it from
sinking under the wave of chain book-
stores.
"hat's the only reason we are allowed
to exist," said trade manager Keith
Taylor. "Wewould be out of business if
not for the extraordinary and unique sup-
port of the U of M community."
But whether support for the store is
beginning to slip or is still holding
strong depends on who you talk to.
Shaman Drum "is an essential part of
the academic community," said English
Prof. Laurence Goldstein. "They have a
number of readings and book-signing
parties. They are a very positive force in
the life of the area."

Many professors in departments such
as history, English, romance languages
and other Humanities divisions have
chosen to order textbooks for their
classes mostly or exclusively through
Shaman Drum. Golden said he is one of
them
Not all professors shared the same
positive attitude about Ann Arbor's
alternative store, however.
English Prof. Peter Pauland said he
uses stores with ties to corporate chains
such as Ulrich's Bookstore and the
Michigan Union Bookstore for the con-
venience of his students. He said both
painfully long lines to wait and the scarci-
ty of used books are factors in his choice.
Students also have mixed opinions,
some voiced concerns about the store's
often-lengthy September lines while oth-
ers said Shaman Drums lack of a large
used book selection hurt their pocket-
books.
LSA first-year student Scott
Seymour said he worried that profes-
sors' preference toward Shaman Drum
would, "probably run up the prices."
Other students said making exclu-
sive trips to Shaman Drum was not
worth the trouble.
"I think (textbooks) should be every-
where for convenience," said LSA first-
year stdent Jennifer Ziarko. "It's not
good they have a monopoly of English
books."
Port responds to such complaints by
saying that Shaman Drum does offer a 50
See M0KS, Page 68

Jerry Cantrell Coming to turn the
State Theater into a "Boggy Depot."
7:30 p.m. State Theater, 2115
Woodward Ave., Detroit. (313) 961-
5450, ext. 1.
Kerrytown Concert House
Performance Kayo Tatebe, a Japanese
pianist, will be performing works by

Gelek Rinpoche Brunch and a lecture Viktor Ullmann: Composer, Jew,
on integrating spiritual practice into Anthroposophist, Humanist Two
daily life, sponsored by Students for a speakers will lecture on Ullmann's
Free Tibet. 11 a.m. Michigan Union anthroposophist roles and his

Some 2/5 of a decade after I
Caroilna-natives Hootle and th
stll available for their Saturd
"Emperor of Atlantis" chaml
Rudolf Steiner House, 192
Ave. 8 p.m.
---------------
Tuesday
CAMPUS CINEMA
The Cheat, A Night At The Si
Of Pauline Part of the theat
ing Silent Film Series, th
shorts. Mich. 4:10 p.m.
Spike & Mike's Classic F
Anknation '98 See Friday. Mic
Pi (1998) See Friday. Mich. 9
MUSIC
Explosion: Cerebral Popular
jazz band continues to please
p.m. Bird of Paradise, 207 S.
662-8310.
Sugar PMl Ann Arbor acoustic
shows its stuff. 10:30 p.m. Ast
338 S. State St. 996-9191.
University Philharmonia
Performing the Liszt Piano
No. 1, Dvorak's "New
Symphony, and Aharon Ha
Child's World." Harlap serve
conductor. 8 p.m. Hill.
THEATER
Lord of Dance This Irish troupe
will bring their famed performs
Theatre for eight shows. Fe
2211 Woodward Ave., Detroit
98346611.8 p.m.
ALTERNATIVES
Doug Allyn Celebrating Michig
Series Week, suspense writer
his work. Northeast Branch Lit
Plymouth Rd. 7 p.m.
Ann Arbor Poetry Slam A moi
that always draws a crowd. Th
featured poet is local pla'
Coffin. The Heidelberg Club A
N. Main St. 8 p.m.

courtesy of Gramercy Pictures
Janeane Garofalo (left) and Vince Vaughn (right) star in David Dobkin's dark comedy "Clay Pigeons," the first comedy of 1998
to sympathetically portray a serial killer. Also starring Joaquin Phoenix.

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