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September 25, 1998 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1998-09-25

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12 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 25, 1998

'Boy' meets
sixth season
on ABC
By Gabe Smith
Dalv Arts Writer
Ben Savage has finally grown up. After follow-
ing in the footsteps of his older brother Fred, cur-
rently on the NBC show "Working," Savage is now
17, and a veteran of television. He first appeared
in the ABC miniseries "Wild Palms," created by
Oliver Stone, and had a recurring role on the NBC
comedy "Dear John."
But Savage is best known for his role as the
bright-eyed lovable Cory Matthews on the hit tele-
vision show "Boy Meets
/ World," which can be found
Friday nights on ABC at 8:30
Boy Meets When the fifth season
World ended, his girlfriend, Topanga,
* (Danielle Fishel) proposed to
Cory on the night of their high
ABC school graduation. The
Fridays at 8:30 p.m. upcoming season will deal
with some of the trials and
tribulations that the two will
experience in dealing with the
marriage proposal.
Cory's best friend, Shawn,
(Rider Strong) will put a
wrench in the living plans of Cory's older brother
Eric (Will Friedle) and Eric's best friend, Jack,
(Matthew Lawrence). Shawn will move out and
share a dorm room with Cory. Ironically, or per-

U 09
J

,

I I
A

Courtesy of Touchstone Television
The cast of ABC's "Boy Meets World," Trina McGee-Davis, Ben Savage, Maitland Ward, Will Friedle, Danielle
Fishel, Mattew Lawrence and Rider Strong return for its sixth season tonight.

haps conveniently, Topanga and her best friend
Angela (Trina McGee-Davis) are living together
across the hallway.
While Eric and Jack struggle to find a replace-
ment for Shawn, a beautiful woman named
Rachel, who just happened to have been dumped,
sets upon them. Thinking that two male room-
mates is the perfect arrangement that she needs,
she moves in with them. Since her previous rela-
tionship has left her devastated, the last thing she's

interested in is another man. What she doesn't
realize is that Eric and Jack immediately fall for
her, turning the situation into a competition to win
her over.
New beginnings seem to be a theme for the
coming season. Cory's parents (Betsy Randle and
William Russ) will continue to prepare for the
coming of their child. This prospect delights
Morgan (L indsay Ridgeway), tborys younger sis-
ter, because she won't have to be the baby any-
more.
Although this sounds a little too wholesome,
that's what "Boy Meets World" is a wholesome
show that viewers of any age can watch.
Admittedly, it probably doesn't appeal to the
mainstream college audience, but in an age of bad
programming on television, "Boy Meets World'
proves that there is still a glimmer of hope.
Whatever happened to those days of "Who's the
Boss?" and "Family Ties"? "Boy Meets World"
helps us to relive those days. With its Friday night
primetime slot, the audience most likely will be
those middle-school to high school freshmen who
have nothing better to do than to cruise the malls
and hang out at burger joints. For older fans, it is
still sometimes fun to turn to a cheesy, wholesome
show just for a contrast to our normal, stressful,
hectic college lives.
"Boy" and his friends will continue to meet
the world in the sixth season of the sitcom. Now, it's
a more grown-up, less insular, more complex,
sometimes decidedly less friendly and definitely
more challenging place than what they left behind
at high school graduation such a short time ago.
But don't worry, lveni when "Boy Meets World"
tackles the more serious issues, it'll still be an
exception rather than the norm.

Courtesy of ABC
The Olsen Twins, Ashley and Mary Kate, return to ABC's TGIF in their new
sitcom, "Two of a Kind."
Olsen twinS ar'e
doule amefun

4

By Chris Cousino
Daily arts Writer
Now that you erased "Family
Matters," "Step-By-Step" and Sasha
Mitchell (star of "Kickboxer" I1
through IV) from your memory, may
you be forewarned. ABC reminds us
again to give thanks for Fridays with
their new cutesy family sitcom "Full
Ilouse 2," ... err ... "Two of a Kind."
And just who might these "Two" he
but none other than Mary Kate and
Ashley Olsen of the not-so-Clint
lastwood epic, "flow the West Was
Fun" Oh yeah, they also played the
ingratiating Michelle cn the enjoy-
able "Full

viewers will definitely enjoy because
they see an adult child or a child
adult.
The straight adult role goes to
Sieber, who is an uptight, conserva-
tive but loving father, like the Saget
role that preceded him. Sieber is
effective as a dad, but college profes-
sor Burke is a little bit of a stretch.
But he does add a few quirky quips,
such as when Mary Kate and Ashley
bring a picnic basket filled with
snacks upstairs to their team meeting
and Dad questions, "Who you feed-
ing up there? The Donner party?"
An even better reply comes from
one of the Olsens saying, "i'm sure
that d be funny if I knew what you
were talking about," which is a
response most younger viewers will
have.
Ashley adds the best line of the
show during a discussion about
poker where Carrie explains,
"Nothing beats a four-of-a-kind,"'
and Ashley retorts, "Boy, when we
were little, full house beat every-
thing.
Following in the "Full "ouse"
footsteps, '9vo of' a Kind" appears
to be ABC's attempt to bolster a once
powerful, now weakening TGIF line-
up.

1

Courtesy of Touchstone Television
Topanga and Cory may start their college life off as a married couple. The answer will come tonight at 8:30
p.m. on ABC.

1 .1

Two of a
Kind
ABC
Fridays at 8 p.m.

I louse."
In "Two of a
Kind," the
Olson twins
are grown up,
playing two
11-year-old
sisters that are
into boys or
b a s e b a l1.
(Don't ask
which is
which. Who
cares really?).
Glone are the

i

--T

4

It s 1

L/hat am Isupposed to think when a company 'ktm-
CHALLENG Eandadve ntu re?
I mean, they could be a*en s r s*e sA **overn . It could all be,
dae I it, further confirmation of the vast conspiracy to HIDE the
about extraterrestriaLs smallpox vaccinations and zip code
Or, it could just be a eo pg m to work. I know the U is out th

s.
ere.

I know there's a j ob waiting that will let me be all thatI canbe.
I want a position that will be motivating
AND EXCITING and rew'r ire.gn ni c

days of toddler Michelle, Uncle Jesse
and Joey, not to mention Bob Saget.
But don't fret. The creative essence
of "Full House" is still in full etect.
First off, the "Full House" set is
practically, if not the same, set used
for the "Two of a Kind" series. It also
borrows the same premise as "Full
House" in that the Olson's new char-
acters lost their mom when they were
young and their widowed science
professor dad (Christopher Sieber)
must raise them on his own.Toassist
in the parenting of the troublesome
two, Dad hires babysitter Carrie
(Sally Wheeler), a cute, perky red-
head, to guide the girls through the
toils of boys, makeup and home runs.
Carrie is the female combination
of John Stamos' Uncle Jesse and
Dave Coulier's Uncle Joey - both
tough rebel and zany kid at the same
time. Wheeler brings a bouncing,
crazy charm to the role, which young

Though the show isn't great, it
works and young children will enjoy
it. Unlike many other sexually orient-
ed sitcoms and news programs, par-
ents can be content in knowing this
one is harnless.
Ihe great artificial chemistry cre-
ated by Sieber and Wheeler is very
basic and can only be the vision of an
ABC producer for a wedding
episode that is probably set to air
next season. But the final shot of this
series premiere episode of the three
females standing together with
cheeks bursting in a sappy grin could
drive many adults into a psychopath-
ic state.

Ud .WL Iow"' O
UP TO?"

A

If parents can conceal any hateful
thoughts "Wo of a Kind" may con-
jure up, they can sit back and watch
their young tots giggle and laugh at a
prime example of mediocrity in a
mediocre new fall season.

A

ENTERTAINMENT NEWS
A brief look at who's doing what in the entertainment industry

THIS IS NOT YOUR FATHER'S
COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY.
NO EASY RIDE DOWN THE
STRAIGHT AND NARROW, AMIGOS.
YOU WANT TO BE
KEPT ON YOUR TOES?
GET U S WEST ON THE HORN.
PLEASE JOIN US FOR OUR UNDER-
GRAD INFORMATION SESSION,
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13.
WE WILL BE CONDUCTING
ENGINEERING INTERVIEWS,
WEDESDAY, OCTOBER 14.
VISIT THE CAREER CENTER
FOR SIGN-UP INFORMATION.

"Ally McBeal" star Calista
Flockhart was far from thrilled to see
her face on the cover of 'rime maga-
zine this summer. "I won't say I was
horrified, but I was quite depressed,"
Flockhart said.
That's because the June 29 Time
cover displayed the actress opposite
feminist icons such as Susan B.
Anthony and asked in its headline: "Is
Feminism Dead?"
"I mean, this is a comedy about an
exaggerated character, and to compare
her to Susan B. Anthony is outra-
geous," Flockhart says in the Sept. 26-

upcoming film "Pleasantville."
The story about two teenagers
transported to the world of a '50s
black-and-white TV show took more
than two years to make and involved
complex problems of lighting and dig-
ital coloring. In the film, scheduled to
open next month, the teens slowly
begin to transform the gray town into
full color. But writer and first-time
director Ross wanted to get it right.
"I realized I had stumbled on a
wonderful metaphor to express what it
means to come alive," Ross says in
Sunday's editiors of the Los Angeles

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