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September 24, 1998 - Image 26

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1998-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

a7 t.1 l/ttltl tstbin'ilmll l i y v#!JI'tJ/R Mill MI,

6B - The Michigan Daily

Weekent agazine - Thurs d y, September 24, 1998

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Right: Infamous Madcap
OJJ ammin' Jay works the
turntable while Chinelos
(left) and Shawn je
Alexander (right) work
out on the microphone
with freestyle poetry at
the Gypsy Cafe every s
Tuesday. The venue's mix>
of hip hop and surreal
poetry keeps cafe re u-
ars coming back and
attracts new audience 4
members every week.
LECTURE NOTE BLOWOUT!!

E Around Town
Gypsy Cafe offers
mix of hip hop,

Lu Road-Trip of the Week
Try the lifestyle of a lord or lady

poetry

Tuesdays

10 DAYS ONLY

I -Y I ENTER
OtoKsTORlls

Bio Anthro 161
Comm Studies 101
Econ 101
Econ 102

Geo Sci 110
Geol Sci 107
Hist 160
Poli Sci 140

Psych
Psych
Psych
Psych

11 1
330
340
350

Psych 370
Psych 380
Wom Studies 220;

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typed paragraph format. Notes are accurate, complete, and
easy to understand. Grade A lecture notes are valuable
supplemental study materials that can help you achieve the
grade you want. All courses are faculty approved.
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previous term.
www.gradeanotes.com- email: annarbor@gradeanotes.com

More Classes Added Daily.
Call 741-9669!
LECTURE NOTES

I
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I
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1

By Kern Murphy
and Gina Rasmussen
Daily Staff Reporters
With more than 20 coffee houses
decorating every street corner in the
Ann Arbor area with their unique clien-
tele, atmosphere, food selection and
coffee choices, what makes the Gypsy
Cafe so special ?
The Gypsy Cafe, located on North
Fourth Avenue, gives a new meaning to
the word coffee house. It is set in a celes-
tial atmosphere with multi-colored walls
aligned with an array of moons and stars
hanging from the ceiling. Just a short
stroll down this starlit path lies an even
more aesthetic and soothing room where
abstract art encompasses the scenery,
sparking curiosity and wonder.
"It has a different flavor, it requires
you to take a large bite and say hrm,"
said Chinelo, co-founder of the Salacious
Intellectuals, the cafe's intriguing
Tuesday night display of hip hop music
combined with open mic poetry.
The Salacious Intellectuals was
founded by Pedrick Jones and Chinelo,
his side kick, this past February. Joining
them was the "Hip Hop Infamous
Madcap DJ Jammin' Jay" who breaks
the intensity by mixing upbeat popular
jams in between each act. Overall, this
type of vocalizing has been more than
welcomed to the Ann Arbor community.
"It's an awesome place to read or
draw ... and the cafe mochas!" said
Leonardo Hanna, a cafe regular.
Another regular, who asked not to be
named, agreed that the non-smoking,
nonalcoholic atmosphere combined
with the diverse entertainment makes
the Gypsy Cafe worth coming back to.
The artistie expression seen every
Tuesday night is not limited to open
mic poetry. It is not uncommon to have
a light-hearted humorous poem fol-
lowed by an intense, serious political
commentary. Elton John wannabees
and aspiring Snoop Doggy Dogg imita-
tors are welcomed as well; the poetry is
interspersed with musical perfor-
mances.

Receive a full term set of lecture notes for only $25.
Vish paW f c %rINc d wlh Ww adsm
Grade A Notes at Ulrich's Bookstore
549 E. University, 2nd Floor " 741-9669.

I
J..

"We try to provide an atmosphere
where everyone likes to share.
Sometimes three-fourths of the way
through the night someone will get up
and share because someone else did,"
Jones commented.
Professionals and novices alike share
pieces of themselves with such fervent
feelings that it is difficult to draw the
line between the experienced and the
newcomers.
Jones reflected, "We encourage any
kind of personal expression within five
to 10 minutes. The majority of the peo-
ple who come in are first-timers, but
there are some regulars: Jones said that
the night begins when people have
signed and filled the nightly entertain-
ment roster. The list remains open
throughout the night for those who are
inspired to perform.
There is, however, an open mic eti-
quette one must follow before stepping
into the limelight of this creative
mecca, where everything and anything
seems to go.
s No more than 10 minutes mic
time.
r'We give extra round of applause
because y'all deserve loge and don't
worry, y'all get some lovin ' (hnelo
explained.
If you are not going to perform.
the admission fee is S
But $5 is a small price to pay to hear
such powerful improvisations and such
pensive prose and poetry. It is impossi-
ble to walk out of the candlelit , serene
setting unmoved by the soulful expres-
sions of these people.
Not only does the atmosphere draw
you in, but the array of tantalizing
gourmet sandwiches, soups, salads and
desserts are another reason to wake up
and smell the coffee.
When you attend, be sure to bring
extra cash, for one bite of their gourmet
fudge brownies will render your return.
Although the Salacious Intellectuals
are relatively new, the turnout grows
larger and more diverse by the week. "I
expect this to get huge," Jones said.
EVERYTHING
YOU NEED TO
KNOW AND
WHY YOU
SHOULD CARE.
SEE P.14-IS.

By Jessica Eaton
Daily Weekend, Etc. Editor
Listen to bawdy humor, gnaw on a
whole turkey leg, and practice your bad
English accent this weekend by travel-
ing to Holly, Mich., and attending the
last two days of the 1998 Michigan
Renaissance Festival.
"We provide a unique experience for
people," explained Michelle Bono, pub-
lic relations director for the festival.
"This is true theater in the round; we
accomplish what all of those computer
games are trying to do with virtual real-
ity.
.yWe give people the chance to live
the Renaissance Festival the way it
should have been, she said. "Without
any plagues or things like that:'
The Michigan Renaissance Festival
is owned by Mid-America Festivals, a
Minnesota-based company that owns
six renaissance festivals nationwide.
The Holly festival is now the second-
largest renaissance festival in the coun-
try. In 1997, 220,000 people attended,
traveling from as far as Indiana and
Ohio for the event.
Every weekend, the festival takes on
a different theme with related events. In
honor of the last weekend of the festi-
val, Sept. 26 and 27 the theme will be
"Sweet Endings," with a pie eatingcon-
test, chocolate festival and wine tasting.
As part of the festival, national and
local acts perform throughout the day
on multiple stages. Popular shows
include the Ded Bob Show and the
daily joust, a horsebackcompetition of
skill between Scotland and England
with striking similarities to WWF
wrestling.
"The Ded Bob Show and the joust
are both national acts," Bono said.
" They tour throughout the year from
Renaissance festival to Renaissance
festival. The royal court and many of
the street characters are local people
who audition. We look for people who
can engage people in improvisational
theater,
Fvery year, the Renaissance Festival
hires 350 professional and amateur
actors to perform in scheduled shows
and on the street. It also sponsors an
academy of student actors, performers
who receive lessons in Renaissance his-
tory, costuming and performance tech-
niques. 'Ihe academy is tuition-free, but
M Mideastern~
Uvz~dtumaeurt
*any sandwich plus a pop
*daily dish special: shish
kabo b, chicken kabob, meat
shawarma, or chicken shawarma
with a salad and choice of rice
or hommous
eheelk i1w m noe
dai"ys-p'ei*-"

members must be at least 16 years old
and are accepted by audition only.
Scott Randall, an LSA junior, per-
forms as a street character in the festival.
"I love it," he said. "Acting is a total
energy trip. More than that, I love the
little kids. The kids are great."
But is this stuff just for kids? Hardly.
Some of the jokes border on the
obscene, but no one seems to mind.
"It's like a raunchy Disneyworld,"
said Randall. "People say it's gotten
worse in the past few years, but it really
hasn't. All of the raunchiness there is
innuendo. Yes, it's implied a little bit
stronger at some times, but it goes right.
over the kids' heads."
Audience members are brought up
on stage and included in many perfor-
mances In "The Bloody, Horrible

Noble knights battle at the Renaissance Festival In Holly, Mi.

Death and Mass Stabbing of Julius
Caesar," the title role is played by a
spectator chosen at random and trained
in his one line: "Et tu, Brute?"
Paul Cobble, from Rochester Hills,
was brought to the stage and taught
Egyptian dancing by the Middle
Eastern Dance Ensemble.
"We had only been here about an
hour," he said. "It was fun. The only
other thing we've really seen so far is
the food ... and the pickles!"
There are also more than 150 artisans
at the festival, selling Renaissance
wares like clothing, swords, and hand-
shaped candles. Artisans are juried in,
and more than 75 percent of their
goods must be hand-made for them to
be accepted, creating a unique shopping
opportunity.

The Unix
Depallm1
is currently o
tr
Office visits an
charge to eligib
general health a
You may also recei
For mor
cat
ML -
blun

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I

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I~iI l

r s.ty
IIICINF

r . r: iir .rr'r

Ann Arbor njj
241 E. Liberty
Ann Arbor
998-0008
Fax 998-0303
Mon.-Sat. 11-12 AM
Sun. 12 noon- 10 PM

_

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Plymouth
447 Forest
(Behind the Mayflower Hotel)
459-3332
Fax 459-3113
Mon.-Sat 11 AM-11 PM
Sun. 12 noon-10 PM

I
i
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1) Value Meals
Only 399
Soup or Cold Drink, Egg Roll, Entree & Fried Rice
Lunch Only
----------------- -
2) Buy one dinner entree and get a second
at half price
3) $2 off for purchase of $10 or more
4) $5 off for purchase of $25 or more

I
I

I

Limit one offer per visit. Coupon must be presented
at time of purchase, expiration 10/30/98
-.---- ---.--..-.-

ft
s
F
TI
For further info

r °.,

DASCOLA BARBERS
ESTABLISHED 1939
615 E. LIBERTY OFF STATE
668-9329
M-F 8:30-5:20
SAT TIL 4:20

l i
I+ ' -
V t ...

LMOUT
r

i

M to Th: llam-10pmn
Fri, Sat: 1lam-i1pm
Sun: Til.T9pm,

1321 S. University
Ann Arbor MI 48104
(734 662-3415

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