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September 17, 1998 - Image 20

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1998-09-17

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6B - he Michigan Daily WeelId Magazine - Thursday, Seember 17, 1998

a

AGE
Continued from Page 20
droves in search of parties on the week-
ends and are fond of flocking to many of
the University' scheduled and planned
events duing the week - - behavior that
is rem niscer of hIgh school.
Part of that high school reminiscent
mentality involves the idea of fitting in
The entering class tends to want to be
like the rest of the group more than older
students do, explains Deb Kraus, a psy-
chologist at the University's Counseling
and Psychological Services. That's why
many people think they can identify
first-year students by the way they look.

a

"There's a pressure to belong and fit
in, to not stand out too weirdly" Kraus
says. "Everybody's trying to find a
niche. In a campus this large, you don't
want to feel like a complete free agent."
Pachella also said the need to be part
of a larger group draws many first-year
students to fraternities and sororities.
"The Greek system is a continuation
of a group mentality, where you are
joined with others not because of shared
values or interests but because of an
arranged situation," Pachella says.
Psychology Prof Chris Peterson says
students can be divided into three class-
es, depending on their progress in the
adjustment process: the entering class,

which has just left home, the continuing
class, which has established itself at the
University, and the departing class,
which is preparing for the fully adult
world of work and relationships.
"First-year students are bright-eyed
and bushy-tailed," Peterson said. "By the
time they get older, they get more jaded.
When they become seniors, they get
more serious, as they look for jobs."
Of course not all of the University's
upperclassmen are well adjusted. And not
all of Ann Arbor's first-year-students
think alike. But the transition most of us
experience during our first year on cam-
pus helps to shed light on why we all
seem so different.

56On All Your School Needs Al
ffice D.E~POT
Compter o iny Budget

DANA LINNANE/Daily
Two students prove once again that video games never care whether you are 21-
years-old or not.

Even with numerous billboards and this big fn
still managed to get lost between 1-94 and Bt
We thought maybe including what the signsa
like it would help future travelers. While Bell'
what Will chose to take home with him, we'r
can't go wrong with any of the dozens of bee
able at Bell's everyday.

eakirg sign we
usiness Loop 94.
actually looked
s Homebrew was
e pretty sure you
rs that are avail-
MARGARET MY ERS/ Daly

ART, LITERATURE and our
NEVER-ENDING PASTA BoWL.
All influenced by ITALIANS.
Only ONE for $6.95 For A Short Time!
Higher education making you hungry?
No problem. Order any pasta and sauce from
our special menu, and enjoy it to your heart's content.
Want more? Of course you do. So choose another pasta,
try another sauce. It's easy. It's Never-Ending. And still
served with our unlimited fresh garden salad
and warm garlic breadsticks. Now that's
Italian generosity. And it's only $6.95.

....0

~JHEWLETT'
CPdiPACKARD

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Above: "This is more heerthan
any of us could drink in a life-
time," says Bell's Brewer
Steve Buszka as he stands
among thousands and thou-
sands of cases waiting to sent
to stores and bars all over
Michigan and surrounding
states.
MARGARET MYERS/Daly
Right: Bell's popular Oberon
beer, label shown here, was
formerly known as Solson until
a Molson-backed lawsuit
forced a name change.

.

S B r5
t e .I i l w45 E i s e n o w e r P w y . , o p p o s i t e B r i a r w o o d M a l l , 6 6 3 - 6 8 7 5

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