100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 28, 1998 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1998-09-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2A - The Michigan Daily - Monday, September 28, 1998

FOOTBALL
Continued from Page IA
mere 22 yards in the second half. That,
combined with stingy coverage in the
secondary, prevented the Spartans from
closing the gap.
The Wolverines sacked Burke six
times, easily the highest output this sea-
son for the defense.
As they have in every previous
game, the Michigan offense continued
to have significant success. The
Wolverines compiled 206 rushing
yards - 69 of them came on an
Anthony Thomas touchdown on his
first carry of the game. The play, late in
the first quarter, was Michigan's first
score of the game.
"I was thinking about the coaches,
who always say 'they better not catch
you from behind,"' Thomas said.
The Spartans could catch neither
Thomas nor fellow tailback Clarence
Williams throughout the contest.
Thomas amassed 106 yards on the
ground while Williams picked up 88.
The other Michigan rushing touch-
down of the game came on a one-yard
quarterback sneak touchdown by
Brady.
The remainder of Michigan's scoring
came from three field goals by Feely,
one of which tied his career longest
kick - a 51-yarder in the first quarter.
Although the Wolverines did pull out
a victory, they fumbled the ball four
times and lost it twice. Both turnovers
came on special teams plays - a fum-
bled punt by James Whitley and a fun-
ble on a pooch kickoff by Grady Brooks.
"We're not a great football team, by
any stretch of the imagination," Carr
said. "But we played hard today and
think that enabled us to overcome the
mistakes we made."

AROUND THE NATION
House passes $80B tax-cut measures
WASHINGTON - An $80 billion Republican tax cut calculated to appeal
millions of middle-class Americans has passed in the House.
President Clinton renewed his threat to veto the election-year bill because
would spend part of the $1.6 trillion budget surplus forecast over the next decad
instead of holding all of it until Social Security is safeguarded.
The House passed the measure 229-195 on Saturday, sending it to the Senate,
its future is less certain. The 16-member Michigan delegation followed a mostlyparty
line vote with all six Republicans and Democrst Jim Barcia (D-Bay City) voting ft
the measure. The delegation's other nine Democrats voted against it.
On Friday, the House voted for 90 percent of any federal surplus to be held
reserve until a Social Security rescue plan is in place.
Republicans pushed through the Social Security bill on a 240-188 vote to blur
Democratic criticism - certain to echo across congressional political campaign
- that the GOP tax cut would amountto a raid on the popular retirement progran
The Michigan delegation split along party lines, with all 10 Democrats votin
against it and the six Republicans for it.
Most Democrats do not support the use of a surplus that may not materialize t
pay for the tax cuts. "They're rushing to spend a surplus that doesn't exist i
House Minority Whip David Bonior (D-Mount Clemens).

High court to look
at appeal requests
WASHINGTON - This morning at
9, one of the capital most important
and least known annual rituals gets
under way, heralded only by the sound
of a buzzer on the first floor of the

the way to the Supreme Court. And II
high court is free to decide which cass
and legal questions are worthy of i
time and attention.
For the justices, the first fall confe
ence --coming a week before the off
cial opening of the new term -e
sets the agenda for the year ahea

Supreme Court.Nu e oft e
Gathered behind closed doors for the N u er WJIted
first conference of the new term, the chickens declines
nine justices will shake hands, trade a
few words about their summer vaca- WASHiNGTON - The incident
tions and sit down to decide on the of salmonella contamination in chicl
1,701 appeals that came in while they ens dropped by nearly half in the fir
were away. six months of the Clinton administr
In a rapid-fire series of votes, they tion's new food-inspection system, pri
will select a dozen or so cases for full liminary government figures shof
hearings and written opinions. Then, in The system, known as the
large part because of negative recom- Analysis and Criticil Control Poin
mendations from young law clerks, (HACCP), is a science-based methc
they will reject the rest. of determining where contaminatic
After a quick three hours, they will might occur all the way through II
adjourn. Other appeals will be consid- chain of food production. Processo
ered by the justices beginningin October must take action at those critical pois
at conferences every Friday of the term. to head off contamination, rather thi
As the civic textbooks say, in just poking and sniffing carcasses
America you can appeal your case all the end of the line.
A&ROUND T1HE WORLDa

Arafat remarks may
refer to statehood
JERUSALEM - Israel has explic-
itly warned him not to do it. The
United States says it too would have
to oppose.
But as Yasser Arafat prepares to step
to the podium at the United Nations
today to deliver his first address to the
General Assembly asa head of govern-
ment, it is still unclear whether he will
use the occasion to announce his plans
to declare a Palestinian state in barely
seven months' time.
The Palestinian Authority presi-
dent already has said that unless there
is significant progress toward an
Israeli-Palestinian settlement, he
intends to make a unilateral declara-
tion of statehood on May 4, 1999, the
date marking the end of a transition
period set by the interim peace
accords reached in Oslo, Norway, in
1993. But an announcement from the
stage of the United Nations would
increase the stakes sharply.
"If he goes forward with the
announcement - and it's hard to imag-

ine why he would give up the opport
nity to drum up international suppc
- it will make it much harder f
either the Palestinians or the Isra
government to back down," said l
Alpher, head of the Jerusalem ofw
the American Jewish Committee ai
an expert on political and strateg
affairs.
Malaysian political
crisis heating up
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia
Malaysia's political crisis enterete
and more-confrontational phase yeste
day as opposition groups and politic
activists launched two broad-bas
coalitions to push for sweeping poli
cal reforms, an end to corruption a
the ouster of longtime Prime Minist
Mahathir Mohamad.
Yesterday's dramatic events -
unusual in a country where oppositi:
voices have been suppressed routine
- were capped by a defiant eveni
rally by tens of thousands of ped.
- Compiled from Daily wire repor

ASI
SYRACUSE
ABROAD
IN
HONG KONG
STUDY-TRAVEL
IN CHINA
BUSINESS &
LIBERAL ARTS
COURSES
GENEROUS
GRANTS &
SCHOLARSHIPS
STUDY
IN ENGLISH
INTER NSHIPS

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745.967) is published Monday through Friday during thefal and winter terms by
students at the University of Michigan. Subscriptions for fail term, starting in September, via U.S. mail are
$85. Winterterm(January throughApril) Is $95, yearlong (September through April) is $165. Onaampus sub.
scriptions for fall term are $35. Subscriptions must be prepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and the Associated collegiate Press,
ADDREsS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.1327.
PHONE NUMBERS (All area code 734): News 7&DAILY; Arts 763.0379; Sports 647-3336; Opinion 7640552;
Circulation 704.0558;C lassifiedadvertising 784.0557: Display advertising 7640554: silling 7840550.
E-mail letters to the editor to daily.lettersfa mih.edu. World Wide Web: http://www.tllchigandailycom
NEWS Janet Adamy, Managing Edne
EDITORS MariaHackedt, Heathenarms, Jeffrey K ,Coss te hritno.
STAFF MelisaAndi, Paul Begdao eeC dCo rg bMkita Easley, Rachel Edelman, Erin Holmes, WiiarNash, ly
O'Com, Lee Pamer, Katie Plma, Susan T Port. NikeaSchulte, Mike Spel, oo Heather Wigin, Jennifer Yacrn, Adam Zuar
CALENDAR: Katie Plana.
EDITORIAL Jack SoMaci, Edite
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Sarah Lockyer, David Wallace
STAFF: Emily Achenbam, Jeff Eldridge, Le Frost, Kaamran Hafeez, Eric Hochstadt, Scott Hunter, Jason Kob, Thomas Kubibrgis, Sarei
Lemire, James Miller, Abby Moses, Aaron Rich, Peter RomerFriedman, Stephen Sarkozy, Kiliy Scheer, Magan SchimpfJohn Targ
SPORTS Jim Rose, Managing
EDITORS: Josh aieinbaum, Shara Raju, Pranay Reddy, Mark Snyder.
STAFF: T.J. Berk, Josh Bokin, Evan Braunstein, Dave DenHerder, Chris Duprey, Jordan Fied, Mark Francescutti, Rick Freemat, Rick
Hapster.,Vaughn R. Kiug, Andy Latack, .L. lura, Stephanie Offen, Kevin Rose" , Tracy Sinder, Nita Smrastava,llmaSteraniir
Jacob Wheeler.
ARTS Kristin Long, Christopher Tkazyk, Edito,
WEEKEND. ETC. EDITORS: JessicaEaton, WilWessert
SUBEDITORS: Bnan Cohen (Music), Michael Galloway (TV/Newmeda), Anna Kovalsi (F aie/PolmrngArts), Joshua Pederson (Fm), Conne Schneide
SAF Joanne Al naear, MotthmBarrett, Chris Cousio, Gabe F*jo, Laura Flyer Geordy Gantsoudes, Steve Gertz, Cait Ha, Bryan Lark,
oie Ln. James Miller, Rob Mitchtm, ern Murphy, Joshua Pederson, Erin Podolsky, Aaron Rich, Adlin Rosli, Deveren Q. Sanders, Ed
Sholinsky, Gabe Smith, TeddWatts, Curtis Zimmerman,
PHOTO Margaret Myers, wrren Zinn, Ei
Ars Ediir:.AdnasYrovmoh
STAFF usBwAisnCaiterMalo S.E. Floyd, Joy acobs, Jessica Johnson, Dana Lnnane, Matt Madill, Kelly McKionelh
ONLINE U cas,
STAFF: Mak Francescatti, Marquins iev.
GRAPHICS STAFF: Alex Hogg, Vicky Lasky, Michele McCombs, Jordan Yourg.
BUSINESS STAFF Adam Smith, Business Manage
DISPLAY SALES Nathn Rostf, Msnng4
STOFF HeeRyanopker Cra gsakow, Melissa Kane, Sonya leerkper, MeaedithLuck, SantheMani, Jennie Murey, Ang l
Kaneko Ono, vyoRamakirshnan, Susan Rosenerg, Deborah dskdik, Michael Schrm5, Dawn Sec"i , Megan Spillane, NwAUdeSubthder.
CLASSIFIED SALES Monica Tas, Manag4
ASSISTANT MANAGER: Pil Camilen.
STAFF: Jery Chu, Uz Davis, Lauren Guttman, JondrKaye, Patrick Lee, Debbie Ubman, RitaPolysahenko,o ISchmitt, Jeremy Simmons a
ONLINE SALES Jamie Krbs, Manag
STAFF: Carie Brzeziki, MilaeUbtew.
ONNE PRODUCTION: Seth Benson.
FINANCE Courtney Ruf, Maeneg
ASSISTANT MANAGER: Jennifer Bak,
STAFF: Peter Frankfort, Ross Kirschner, MdaiSaoh, G ka Shah.
ADVERTISING PRODUCTION Tracey Uell, Head DesIgs4
DESIGNERS: Beth Havach,Ahen McCrodden, sstin Tudbel.
PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS: Merkys Gomez Ran White.
AD PLACEMENT COORDINATOR Aaron Klemans
SPECIAL SECTIONS MANAGER MarnIe Kadi0
CRCULATION MANAGER UndSy Spol
NATIONAL AD COORDINATOR Aison MR
SYSTEMS ANALYSTS Kemir Baker, Todd Brockdorf, Satadru Pranuani

' ' ~' ~ www~towerrecords.com
ANN ARBOR
South University Galleria (1214 South University Avenue, upstairs)
w u,.,

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY
119 Euclid Avenue
Syracuse, NY 13244-4170
1-800-235-3472
suabroad@syr.edu
http://sumweb.syr.eduldipa

li
1

AnhnyRed o - .

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan