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November 23, 1998 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1998-11-23

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T
The Michigan Daily - Monday, November 23, 1998 -- 7A

LOCAL/S TATE

I P!

."iCODE
--tcntinued from Page 1A
integrity; the implementation of
a 'uniform integrity policy; and
thb formation of a student group
charged with increasing ethical
awareness.
MSA has approved all three
objectives, but LSA-SG, because
of existing precedents, did not
approve the formation of the stu-
dent group.
i'Realistically, because of the
decentralized nature of the
*University, it is detrimental if we
,were to scrap everything," said
. rinivas Sridhara, a member of
AIG.
"We're just trying to coordinate
schools," Sridhara added.
,Although Guffey, who was*
uncertain how attainable his
g~als are, said the project is still
"ijn the beginning process,"
members of the AIG said the
:, University is lagging behind
:.eer institutions in its creation of
.a uniform policy.
Big Ten rival Michigan State
University already has estab-
lished policies similar to the
proposed campuswide honor
code.
MSU Student Assembly Chair
Nate Smith-Tyge cited his col-
lege's Academic Freedom Report
-and the General Student
:Regulations as two documents
that dictate university ethics,
=rules and integrity.
"These are two universal docu-
Siments that are over everybody
and then you have things specific
to, the divisions of colleges,"
Smith-Tyge said.
" It works just like a hierarchy
system. In general, it is very fair
.and treats us pretty well," he
added.
In meetings with Vice
President for Student Affairs
Maureen Hartford and Associate
Provost for Academic and
:Multicultural Affairs Lester
nts, the AIG has stressed the
-need for fairness to all University
students.
- "Overall, the important thing is
.what kind of message the
University is sending its stu-
tdnts," Sridhara said.

Ohio State bloodied
by Michigan in 'baffle'

By Jody Simone Kay
For the Daily
Perhaps Michigan did not win the
football game against Ohio State on
Saturday, but last week the
University won another battle - the
week-long Blood Battle against
OSU.
The competition is sponsored
annually by local chapters of Alpha
Phi Omega, a community service
fraternity, on both campuses.
"it went above and beyond our
expectations," said APO member
and LSA sophomore Mike Masters.
"Everything just came together real-
ly well for us."
With the help of Circle K and Tau
Beta Pi, an Engineering Honor
Society, Alpha Phi Omega collected
1,499 pints of blood - only 15 pints
more than OSU.
"We were hoping to (win) because
it's been a while," LSA sophomore
Megan Powell said. OSU has won
the battle the last six years. She
attributes much of the success of the
drive to the collaboration among
student groups.
"We never really worked that
closely with other student groups,"
said Powell, an APO member.
Both Powell and APO member

Aditi Vijay, an LSA junior, co-
chaired the event. Many students
said the success of the drive was a
result of the amount of publicity on
campus.
Laura Kao, an Engineering first-
year student who gave blood, said
she "found out (about the drive)
because of the posters in the
dorms."
Kao also attributed much of the
success of the drive to the fact that-
APO created donor sites in the resi-
dence halls.
"It was really convenient to just
go downstairs" said Kao, who lives
in Mosher-Jordan Residence Hall.
Randy Hadcock, A PO's contact at
the American Red Cross, said this
specific blood drive is the largest,
one conducted by an organization in
the entire state of Michigan.
It ultimately benefits patients in
the southeast region of Michigan.
During the 17-year span of the
Blood Battle, 200,000 pints of blood
have been donated by both Michigan
and OSU.
Each pint benefits three people,
according to the American Red Cross.
Therefore, 600,000 people have
probably benefited from the Blood.
Battle.

DARBY FRIEDLI5/Dady
Gary Perkins, president of the Ann Arbor chapter of the Order of the Engineer, places a ring on the finger of an initiated
member.

i 0
Engineering si
By Yaet Kohen
Daily Staff Reporter
The Order of the Engineer Initiation Ceremony was held
yesterday for those graduating Engineering seniors who have
pledged to take pride and ethics with them as they enter the
workforce.
The ceremony gives Engineering students an opportunity
to recite the Obligation of an Engineer - a voluntary oath
crafted to instill ethics in engineers.
"The purpose is to foster a feeling of pride and dedication
to our profession" said Stephen Stewart, OOE committee
founder.
Decades ago, engineers discovered that "a need existed for
an introduction for the spirit of brotherhood and cohesiveness
among engineers" said Gary Perkins, president of the Ann
Arbor chapter of the OOE.
"As engineers we have to realize that we are also proxy
decision makers for the consumer" said Andrew Crawford,
the keynote speaker at yesterday's initiation ceremony and an
Engineering alumnus.
Crawford added that consumers are not necessarily knowl-
edgeable about the kind of work that is involved in making
cars, bridges and other products. It is the job of the engineer
to make sure these products remain safe and efficient.

tudents

i

ionor society
According to a pamphlet distributed by the OGE, the
Obligation of the Engineer is voluntary and similar to the
Hippocratic Oath, which is taken by graduating medical stu-
dents.
The organization was created to foster pride in the field of
engineering. "There are no meetings other than the ceremo-
ny and there are no dues," Stewart said.
As part of the initiation, students are given a stainless steel
ring shaped like a bridge that is to be worn on the pinkie fin-
ger of the working hand, Stewart said
The tradition of the ring comes from an incident that
occurred in Canada "when some engineers made a mis-
take in building a steel bridge. The bridge fell down and
killed a lot of people," said Nabeel Abu-Ata, OOE com-
mittee co-chair.
"Basically, what they did is they started this society of
engineers to make them follow some ethics" when building
bridges, roads or freeways, Abu-Ata said.
The ring was first given to graduating engineers in Canada
the year that the bridge fell down. It was made out of the steel
of the fallen bridge, Abu-Ata said.
"It says to all who see it 'Here is an engineer possessed of
a publicly avowed dedication to his profession and public
concerns,"' Stewart said.

Fewer residents mean
less crowded halls

HOUSING
Continued from Page 1A
problems" had an easier time this
year changing their living arrange-
ment because of the open spaces.
"The living environment in the
residence halls has improved," Taub
said.
"There are shorter lines for the
bathroom and less crowding in the
cafeteria."
Taub said RHA will not step up its
promotion efforts for re-application,
which begins in February, to encour-
age more students to return to the
residence halls.
"We're not necessarily going force
people to live in the halls," Taub
said.
RHA will work in conjunction
with the Greek system and co-opera-
tive housing to inform students

about housing options.
Taub added that upperclass stu-
dents will be encouraged to live in
non-traditional halls that do not have
dining halls, such as Vera Baits, to
open more space on Central Campus
for first-year students.
LSA sophomore Justin Goble
found herself alone in a double
room, after her first roommate
moved out after two days.
"I was very surprised I didn't have
a roommate for a long time.
Normally, people try and get into
West Quad," said Goble, who lives in
a double room.
Goble said she hasn't noticed
shorter bathroom lines but said "It
seems like there's less people and
fewer overflows."
Goble said she does not plan to
return to the residence halls next
year.

FOOTBALL
C6ntinued from Page IA
i every possible hole in the porous
1 higan secondary.
"If he's not an All-America football
player," said Ohio State coach John
Cooper, "I don't know what one is."
Though Tom Brady surpassed
Germaine in passing yardage (a
Michigan-record 375 yards,) most of
Brady's tosses came during the catch-up

mode as Michigan tried to emerge from a
game-long deficit. To climb from the
depths of three 18-point deficits, Brady
had to throw a school-record 56 passes,
31 of which were completed.
Playing in the Horseshoe where they
lost their previous game to Michigan
State on Nov. 7, the Buckeyes dominat-
ed Michigan from the opening quarter,
consistently rolling up yards and touch-
downs with apparent ease.
Michigan's ground game, which was

surging after two consecutive weeks of
success, struggled Saturday to amass just
four yards. While the total was damaged
by the minus-29 yards Brady took in
sacks, the only flashes of effective posi-
tive yardage came on a brief third-quarter
series by Anthony Thomas.
Thomas and fellow back Clarence
Williams, each who rushed for 100
yards in last week's 257-yard effort
against Wisconsin, saw scarlet red
shirts blocking every path Saturday.

"We shut their running game down to
about nothing,"Cooper said.
The hostile environment of Columbus
all week came to head at the Stadium on
Saturday and the Ohio State players did
little to dissuade the taunting. A sea of red
engulfed the few Michigan fans in atten-
dance as the O-H-I-O of the fans' cheers
made their way around "the Horseshoe"
"Give credit to fans," Cooper said.
"That's the loudest I've ever heard the
stadium."

KNOW OF NEWS? CALL THE DAILY
AT 76-DAILY.

SNOW PLOWING and shoveling
positions. In our vehicles or yours. Great 2nd
job-Most work done between I i p.m. and 10
a.m $12/hr. to start! Plus a bonus if you use
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ask about flex. sched.! Also need SUB.
CONTRACTORS with own truck and
. $50.00/hr to start. Experience = $$$.
Mike Riley 973-0930.
SPECIAL GIFT - We're looking for healthy
wormen between the ages 21-35 for egg
donation. All ethnic backgrounds are
encswraged. Fee paid. Send inquiries to
AAR4MA, P.O. Box 2674, Ann Arbor, Ml
WANTED- IN-HOME CAREGIVER. A
vkiflin with disability needs person to assist
with -personal care and daily tasks. Part time,
hrs., good pay. Call Mrs. T 734-487-
1:O0pm-10:O0pm.
WEB MASTER-Entry level, must have
basic knowledge of Photo Shop, Office '97,
C.G.I. & PERL, Java Programming. Full or
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ext: 128 or fax resume to (734) 669-8485.
child care
tLD CARE FOR 1-3 Wonderful
chtdren, ages 2, 4, and 6. 35 hrs./wk. Mon.
14.7, Tues. 11-6, Wed. 11-5, Thurs. 11-6,
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experience. Good pay. Jan. 11-June 18.
S Urher hours avail. Call 734-669-0956 with
red.:
DAYCARE ASSISTANT PART TIME.
Own transportation. Will train. 663-1737.

OVERNIGHT SUPERVISION. Occasional
transportation for 13 yr. old boy. Wed. after
school 'till a.m., and one Sat./mo. Must have
car. 995-5696.
TEACHER PART TIME for before and
afterschool childcare program in Ann Arbor
public school. Great fun, pay starts at $6.75
per hour. Call Beth or Laura at 761-7101.

FLORIDA SPRING BREAK
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info www.sandpiperbeacon .com. 800-488-
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#1 SPRING BREAK SPECIALS!
Book early & receive a free meal plan.
Cancun & Jamaica $399, Bahamas $459,
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A #1 SPRING BREAK...
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L

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CHRISTIAN ROOMMATE wanted. Male,,*
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PARANG GERI LARKIN - An ordained
Buddhist Teacher, will lead a meditation
group meeting in the Sophia B. Jones room,
Michigan Union, 7 pm, Monday, Nov. 23rd. -
WINTER ESCAPE--COZY log cabins on
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Pick up the
at these
drop) spots:.
Fleming Bldg., Rackham,
Athletic Dept., ISR, Law
Library, Student Publica-
tions Bldg., Michigan Union,
Angell/Mason (2 sites),
Pierpoint Commons (N
Campus), EECS (N. Cam-
pus), E. Engin., Frieze Bldg.,
Dennison Bldg., LSA Bldg.,
Business School, Under-
graduate Library, Graduate
Library, MLB, Chem Bldg.,
CC Little, N. Campus/CC
Little bus stop dropbox,

i

AM

/0000M

H

rU. oI11W

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