100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 14, 1998 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1998-04-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

w

NATION/WORLD

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, April 14, 1998 - 7

Famous
dancer
with slster
TAMPA, Fla. (AP) - The deacon
approached Patricia Coleman on Easter
Sunday, the day of rebirth and resurrec-
tion. Had she seen the article about her
'brother?
No, it wasn't Tony, who had died of
cancer 18 months earlier. And not Dale,
the IBM executive in New York.
The Associated Press story he had
read in The Tampa Tribune was about
Arthur Bell, a 71-year-old man, once a
pioneering ballet dancer, who'd been
found homeless and disoriented on a
Brooklyn street, his feet almost frozen.
Arthur! The missing brother, the one
who had fled a stifling life in a small
Southern town as the first son of a
preacher who reviled dancing - the
thing Arthur loved best in all the world.
The brother she and her four sisters and
two brothers had hunted for decades.
"I said, 'Oh Lord. is he dead or is he
alive?"' Coleman said. "He has risen.
My brother rose on Easter Sunday."
"Only God could do this," another
sister, Annie Stubblefield said yester-
day, as she and her sisters worked to
arrange a reunion with their brother,
now in a New York City nursing home
regaining strength and relearning to
'walk.
By midday they had arranged for
Dale Bell, who had met Arthur only
once, as a grade-schooler when the
dancer returned briefly in the mid-
1950s, to visit the nursing home this
week when he returns from a business
trip. The rest of the family plans to visit
as soon as they can make arrangements.
Arthur Bell's reaction to hearing
about his family was recounted by
social worker Clare Osman: "He said,
Oh, my God, Dale.' He said, 'That's a

Clinton's focus turns abroad

WASHINGTON (AP) - President
Clinton is off this week to South
America, just after visiting Africa and a
few weeks before heading to Europe for
an economic conference. Then comes
China in June, with forays later to
Malaysia, Pakistan, Bangladesh and
India. And now Ireland may be added.
While Clinton has traveled abroad
extensively throughout his presidency,
his heavy itinerary for 1998 fits with
what historians say is a tendency by
second-term presidents to pay more
attention to foreign affairs.
Presidents who manage to get re-
elected generally have had enough suc-
cess with their domestic agendas in the
first four years that they can spend
more time looking abroad in the second
term, says Stephen Wayne, a professor
at Georgetown University.
Plus, they're often weary of
Washington politics by then.
"After a while, you get tired of the
criticism in Washington from the other

party, from the media, and you get a lit-
tle tired of the political positioning for
the next election, since you can't run,"
Wayne said.
In Clinton's case, there is plenty in
Washington to be tired of.
This year's foreign itinerary was
largely set before the Monica Lewinsky
investigation came up. But the trips still
give Clinton a chance to leave all that
behind and project a presidential image
from dramatic settings abroad while the
strong economy keeps people content
back home.
Clinton leaves tomorrow night for
four days in Chile, where he will pay a
state visit to President Eduardo Frei and
join heads of state from 34 Western
Hemisphere nations for a two-day
Summit of the Americas in Santiago.
The centerpiece of the visit will be the
launching of negotiations to produce a
hemispheric free trade zone by 2005,
under a timetable established at the first
Summit of the Americas in Miami in

1994. But this year's trip lost much of its
potential impact when Congress refused
to give Clinton "fast track" authority to
negotiate trade treaties without fear of
congressional amendment.
"The absence of fast track prevents a
real agreement from being negotiated,"
said Barry Bosworth, a Brookings
Institution economist. "The whole
thing, to the United States, is a little
embarrassing for the people who have
been involved in negotiations with
Latin America for a long time."
Presidential adviser Mack McLarty
said, "I think we can make significant
progress in the near term without it."
Richard Feinberg, a former Clinton
administration official who was a key
architect of the first summit, said there
has been little substantive progress on
trade liberalization since the Miami
summit, adding that Clinton's failure to
get fast-track authority "definitely
hangs as a shadow" over the Chile
meeting

Pulitzer entries are challenged

AP PHOTO
Arthur Bell, the first African American dancer of the New York Ballet, holds a pose
from the ballet "Illuminations."

great thing. He has a chance to see all
of his family again."
The reunion was a long time com-
ing. His sisters recall a charming
teen-ager who loved to sing and
could dance like no one else they
knew, but who so chafed at his strict
upbringing that he boarded a bus for
New York City on the day he gradu-
ated from high school. World War II
was not yet ended.
Patricia was in elementary school
and decided the brother she was crazy
about just didn't love her. Evangeline
was 5 and remembers the day Arthur sat
down and told her he was going to New
York to dance. Sharon was an infant;

she grew up hearing about the glam-
orous brother who had picked out her
name.
"He was just determined to be a
dancer," Stubblefield said. "He was
determined not to be a laborer, and he
made it."
They saw him only once again, the
quick visit in the 1950s when their
father was ill. After that, Arthur Jr. fell
out of touch and they watched his
career from afar, hearing from an aunt
that his dancing career had led him to
London and Paris.
Then he seemed to vanish entirely,
and all their efforts to locate him ended
in dead ends.

NEW YORK (AP) - At least five entries for Pulitzer
Prizes this year were challenged for accuracy or fairness by
outside parties during the judging process, the Pulitzer
administrator said yesterday.
The number of such lobbying efforts was greater this year
than any time since the board decided in 1994 to let Pulitzer
juries see outside challenges, according to Seymour Topping,
administrator of the prizes in journalism and the arts.
This year's winners are being announced today.
Pulitzer juries consider hundreds of entries submitted by
newspapers in 14 categories and nominate three for the cov-
eted prizes. The Pulitzer Prize Board at Columbia University
chooses the winners.
Topping said he personally screens the challenges and then
passes along those with substance to the juries.
He said the challenges all have been in the newspaper cat-
egories, none in arts and letters.
The efforts to influence the outcome, first reported by The
New York Times, was described as beneficial by some board
members and former jurors.
"I welcome them," said Geneva Overholser, chair of the
Pulitzer board and ombudsman of The Washington Post. "It's
better to hear about a problem before rather than after."

"Unless an entry's going to be at the top of the list, you
don't pay attention to the complaint. If it is, I want to know
everything about it," said board member Andrew Barnes, edi-
tor, president and CEO of the St. Petersburg Times in Florida.
Matt Storin, editor of The Boston Globe, which entered a
series on police misconduct, said: "Challenges are legitimate,
but should be withheld until an entry makes it to the finals."
The Globe stories prompted a complaining letter from the
police department to the entire Pulitzer board and attracted
national attentionafter the newspaper reported the police had
obtained a copy of the newspaper's entry, which Storin called
a private document,
Storin said five-member juries burdened with judging as
many as 150 entries don't have time to consider a challenge
in detail and might use it as a way to pare the list.
William German, editor of the San Francisco Chronicle,
said he wouldn't want to encourage complaining letters.
"But part of the rules should be that whoever's accused is
given a chance to respond. Then trust the jurors and the board
to be just,' German said.
The Chronicle submission of a series on the way disabled
children are assigned to foster care was the target of a com-
plaint.

oaNTHUSIASTIC, friendly people needed
Wor fast-paced, first class tanning salon. Full
& art time shifts available. Hiring now & for
fall. Apply at Tanfastic 533 E. Michigan
Ave.,Saline or 627 S. Main, Ann Arbor.
FILM STUDENT wanted part-time for es-
tablished poster business. Excellent pay! 973-
7303.
FUN SUMMER JOBS for students who
want to make a difference. General
counselors, WSI's, arts & crafts, and
specialists needed from June 22 - August 14.
Must live in Bloomfield, Novi, Farmington,
or adjacent areas. WILLOWAY DAY
AMP 248/932.2123 or e-mail
willowaydc@aol.com
GENERAL LABOR/swimming pool
maintenance. Top pay: $600+/wk. for self-
motivated individuals. N.W. Detroit suburbs.
Call Craig at 248-477-7727.
GREAT SUMMER JOB! Spring Valley
Trout Farm, Dexter. Work w/ children on
field trips, general farm work, and some fish
cleaning. May-Aug. 40 hrs./wk.. $7.00/hr.
426-4772.
HAVE AN AMAZING SUMMER! Coed
camp in Massachusetts seeks caring &
motivated college students who love kids!
eneral & specialty counselors needed. Join
dedicated team. Competitive salaries +
room+ board+ travel. 800-762-2820.
HEALTHY INDIVIDUALS needed (18-
60yrs.) to participate in several diffrent UM
research studies.kInvolvement: blood
samples, possibly taking a medication, inter-
view & questionnaire, OR viewing slides.
Compensation $25-$200, depending on
study. Call 936-4395.
HOME HEALTH CARE attendants for lo-
cal student. No experience necessary-will
train. Great opportunity for nursing and OT
students. Very flexible schedules. Must have
- sportation. Call 930-6152.

HOUSEKEEPING & TELEPHONE
answering. $7.00 per hr. 994-9100.
INDIVIDUALS NEEDED FOR research
studies: The Wamer-Lambert/Parke-Davis
Community Research Clinic is seeking heal-
thy males, aged 18-55, for participation in
medication research studies. Length of study
time is approximately two-four weeks.
Research subjects will be paid approximately
$500.00-$1000.00 for participation. You
must not take daily prescription medications
or have any chronic illness. For more
information, please call Liz at (734) 622-
7051, Mon.-Fri., 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 2800
Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48105.
INTERESTED IN WORKING with
children? Be a Summer Day Camp Counselor
for boys. Program is child-centered, non-
competitive. Trans. provided/good salary/fun.
Circle M Day Camp, Wheeling, Illinois. 847-
537-9700.
INTERNET USERS NEEDED for user-tes-
ting of websites. Testing takes 1 hr. Pay $20.
No experience req. Call 665-9307 for
scheduling. Diamond Bullet Design.
INTERNSHIP: MARKETING BROKER
openings with Commercial Trade Exchange.
Positions in Mid and West Michigan. Busi-
ness/marketing majors preferred. Automobile
required. Phone Mr. Kay at (800) 882-4299
for details.
LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION labor.
$7.50/hr. Good working conditions. EOE.
668-8180.
LANSING AREA Phone Bank Systems is
hiring motivated individuals to fundraise for
PBS & The Arts over the summer. Earn up to
$9/hr. + bonuses. Great resume builder,
flexible scheduling-work evenings, 15-36
hrs./wk. Located downtown East Lansing.
CALL 517-332-1501.

LAST CHANCE TO MAKE $2000 in one
week! Motivated student groups (Fraternities,
sororities, etc.) needed for marketing project.
Call Dennis 800-357-9009.
NANNIES/LIVE-IN NEEDED for NY/CT/
CA/NJ families. Minimum one year
commitment. Professional and affluent
families. Must have child-care and/or related
experience. Excellent opportunity for net-
working and saving money. Also accepting
applications for new Elite Division. Average
Salaries $300-$500/wk. Limited summer
positions. 1-800-932-2736.
NATIONAL PARK Employment - Forestry,
Wildlife, Preserves, Concessionaires, Fire
fighters, & more. Competitive wages +
benefits. Ask us how! 517-324-3110 ext.
N55984.
NOTETAKERS NEEDED!
Seniors & Grads. Attend class, take notes.
Earn up to $14/lecture. Variety of classes,
flexible schedule. Faculty approved classes
only. Reserve a class of your choice for the
fall term now. Apply at Grade A Notes, 549
E. University Ave., or call 741-9669 for more
info.
NUTRITION & CANCER study research
asst. needed. Must have computer & stats
skills. Req. some lab work. Send letter &
resume: S.A. Henderson, School of Public
Health II, 1420 Washington Heights, AA, MI
48109-2029. 647-0216.
OFFICE ASSISTANT Dept. of
Epidemioolgy. $9/hr. Apr.-Aug. Also re-
qu ires lifting of heavy boxes. Contact Jody
Gray 764-5454.
OFFICE ASST. $6.50/hr. Exp. w/ MS Word
& Excel. Call 647-3605.
OFFICE MANAGER/SECRETARY
needed for landscape design/build firm. Must
be able to operate PC, communicate with
clients, perform basic accounting, provide of-
fice support. F/T Sum. PIT Fall & Winter.
EOE. 668-8180.

RUN YOUR OWN SUMMER BUSINESS.
Lawn sprinkler installation & sales. Earn up
to $10,000. Vehicle req. You choose the
location in Michigan or Ohio suburbs. Green-
land Irrigation 1-800-361-4074.
SALES- Unlimited financial rewards, proven
program and methods and a meaningful and
rewarding career await you at Northwestern
Mutual Life, the company Jobs 97 called "A
sales person's dream company." If you are
interested in a career in financial services,
contact lerb Black at 734-663-9307 at the
Ann Arbor District Agency of Northwestern
Mutual Life.
SALESPERSON. Commission-based. Web-
site sales. Full-time, flex. hrs. Ann Arbor/
Detroit area. Fax resume to 665-9353 or e-
mail to jobs adiamondbullet.com
SANDWITCH MAKER, DISHWASHER
& CASHIERS wanted at Northern LIGHTS
Cafe at Kerrytown. For interview call 665-
8841.
SCOREKEEPERS IS NOW TAKING ap-
plications for waitstaff Spring/Summer (Art
Fair) Energetic, punctual applicants should
apply today 310 Maynard 9950100.
SPECIAL GIFT-We're looking for healthy
women between the ages 21-35 for egg
donation. Alleethnic backgrounds are
encouraged. Fee paid. Send inquiries to
AARMA, P.O. Box 2674, Ann Arbor, MI
48106.
SUBSTITUTES NEEDED. NAEYC Ac-
credited Early Childhod Center is in need of
substitues for Spring and Summer. Call 668-
0887.
SUMMER CAMP JOBS: at Camp Fowler
for children and adults with developmental
disabilities. Seeking applicants for counselor
positions. June 8 - August 14, 1998. Call
517-673-2050 or email
greenes@mail.msen.com
SUMMER FULL-TIME HELP for very
busy new A2 business. Must have own trans.
Familiar with computer/Windows. Good
communication skills nec. No Dress Codel
$7-8/hr. Call Carla at 761-1150.

2 GREAT KIDS, age 5 & 3, need p.m. sitter
on Mon. & Thur. Can give more hrs. if nec.
Excellent pay. Call 662-4805.
2 YR. OLD TWIN GIRLS seeking sitter in
our NE Ann Arbor home. Non-smoker. 2
days/wk in 6 (or 5)/98 thru 8/98. Call Anne
913-5820.
AFTER SCHOOL CHILD CARE
NEEDED. Spr./sum. or longer term. Looking
for warm & exp. caregiver 3 aftemoons/wk.
Tues. 3-6:30 p.m. Thurs. & Fri. 3-5:30 p.m.
More sum. hrs. if desired. 2 children, ages 8
& 12 in our Bums Park home. Good pay for
reliable n-smkg. w/own car, ref. 769-2875.
BABYSITTER SOUGHT for jolly 1 yr. old
this summer. Flexible hours & transportation
required. CPR a plus. Close to campus. Call
7-9640.
CHILD CARE 3 wonderful children ages 1,
3, & 6. T/Th 11-6 & or M 10-4:30 Ann
Arbor. Own trans. N-smkg. Must have exp.,
energy, enthusiasm. Apr 27-June 12. Sum./
Fall hrs. avail. Good pay. Call w/ ref. 669-
0956.
CHILD CARE NEEDED for an infant. 12-
15 hrs./wk. Beginning May call 995-0625.
CHILD CARE for infant in our N.E. Ann
Arbor home. Full time, Mon.-Fri. Start July.
Non-smoker. Previous exp. & references
required. 913-4073.
CHILD CARE CENTERS looking for
teacher for immediate and summer
employment. We are an equal opportunity
employer, although men are encouraged to
apply. Please call 761-2576. $7.25 to $8.50/
hr.
CHILDCARE- NE A2 for ages 4, 7 & 11.
15-20 hrs./wk. Good pay. Driving req. Car
provided. Call 769-8275.
SITTER-CHAUFFEUR for schoolgirl.
Thurs., Fri., Sat., aftemoon/evening. Need
own car. Excellent pay 665-4719.
SUMMER CHILD CARE 24 hrs./wk. for 3
& 6 yr. old girls in our Ann Arbor home. Call
213-1687.
SUMMER CHILDCARE NEEDED in our
home for 2 girls ages 8 & 9. Month of July
8am-lpm Mon. - Fri. Own car a must. Refs.
required. 761-1674.
$ LOW FARES WORLDWIDE & Summer
Charters to Europe. Frankfurt from $629,
London from $449, Shannon from $429. In-
stant purchase Eurail passes. Regency Travel
209 S. State 665-6122.

' = announcements
ADOPTION Loving, college educated
couple wishes to adopt. We can provide a
child w/ a fine education and beautiful home
filled w/ much love & laughter. Please call
Cindy & Don 800-33-2116.
NAKED MILE VIDEO/photo it for $$. Pay
$$ other rumns. 800-546-1150.
U OF M HOCKEY garage sale. Sat. April
18 9:00 a.m. Yost Ice Arena.

I

ROOMMATE WANTED to share large 1
bdrm. starting Sept. 1. 1 block from Union on
State St. Fully furnished females only 327-
9415.

U

ADOPTION

S/1

NNN

a-,

..G
C
1
C
C,
CD
C9

PAINTERS NEEDED to paint. Complexes
in Rochester Hills, Clinton Township, &
Clarkston. $8.00/hr. and 35-40 hrs./wk. Exp.
helpful, but not nec. Call Christian @ 1800-
477-1001 x 406.
PART OR FULL TIME deli helpers $7/hr.
to start.
Dimo's Deli & Donuts. 662-7944.
PHOTO LAB TECH- minilab tech for Pro
Lab. (EXPERIENCE PREFERRED) Flexible
schedule. FT/PT. Jeff @ Foto-l. (734) 665-
3686x16 or jeffg@fotol.com.
RECEPTIONIST FOR small non-smoking
Ann Arbor office. M-F, 8 to 5. Salary $7 to
$9/hour. Neg. start date. Health insurance not
offered. 429-0447.
RECEPTIONIST
busy photo lab seeks person Mon.-Fri., 2PM-
7PM for answering multi-line phone system,
filing and general office duties. Computer
experience and excellent commuication skills
required. Call 665-3686 x55.
RESEARCH ASST. FOR study of women's
health. 20-30 hrs./wk. Daytime M-F. Data-
entry/coding. Now recruit study participants
in Fall. Pref. BA/BF, some computer exp. $7-
9/hr. 1 year commitment. Call Bonnie 763-
4281.
RESPITE CARE PROVIDERS. Child care
for emotionally impaired youth, ages 3 to 18.
Flex. hrs. Must be 18 yrs. old and have trans.
S81hr. Next training0 Mav 16. Call CaIrolvn

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, Sur-
vey Research Center Survey Lab is now
recruiting people with excellent communica-
tion skills and interest/background in the so-
cial/economic sciences to join a team collec-
ting national public opinion telephone
interviews. Candidates need to be highly self-
directed with a professional telephone man-
ner for conducting research interviews. Ex-
perience with IBM compatible computers
helpful. Keyboard/typing skills required.
Must be available to work 16-20 hrs. per
week, nearly exclusively evenings and
weekends. Competitive wages-starting at
$9.50/br.
Apply in person, weekdays 8:30 a.m.-5:00
p.m., at the University of Michigan, Institute
for Social Research, Rm. 3350, 426
Thompson St., Ann Arbor from 4/10/98
through 4/30/98. The University of Michigan
is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action
employer.
TRAVEL-TEACH ENGLISH: 5 day/40 hr.
(May 20-24) TESOL teacher cert. course (or
by corresp.) 1000's of jobs avail. NOW.
FREE info. pack, toll free 1-888-270-2941.
U OF M CHILD CARE Resource & Refer-
ral Counselor. Family Care Resources
Program has a full time 37.5 hrs. per week
position. Positive, flexible work environment.

Abundant love and guidance will be given to
your baby. Let us help you fulfill the dreams
& expectations you have for your child.
Caring couple w/ much to share is seeking a
baby to & nurture. An adoption plan takes
courage. Expenses paid. Please call Joan
and Bill 1-80-311-7663. Thank you.
SPECIAL EGG
DONOR NEEDED
Loving infertile couple is
hoping to find a compassion-
ate woman to help us have a
baby. We're hoping for some-
one who has blond or brown
hair and blue eyes. We'd be
delighted to find a healthy,
intelligent, college student or
graduate. Age 21-30.
Thank you for your consider-
ation. Compensation up to
$5000 plus expenses.
If you can help us, please call
1-800-886-9373, ext. 6733.

r

UNABLE TO KEEP UP WITH THE REST OF THE FLOCK,
MAURY "THE DUCK" FOUND HIMSELF A SITTING DUCK.

$ STUDENTS Purchase your tickets with

I I 1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan