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March 10, 1998 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1998-03-10

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, March 10, 1998 - 7

Albanians
won't gather
dead bodies
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia (AP) - Ethnic
Albanians demanded yesterday that interna-
tional experts examine the bodies of dozens
killed in a Serb police crackdown in Kosovo
- and insisted that Serb authorities were
pressing for quick burials to hide evidence of
police atrocities.
Ethnic Albanians said they counted at least
52 corpses, including 13 children, 12 women
and four elderly people, from the second of
two police sweeps through an area west of
Pristina last week.
"The Serb regime has committed an atroci-
ty," said Enver Maloku, spokesperson for the
ethnic Albanians' Kosovo Information Center,
adding that some bodies were so badly burned
they could not be identified.
His account and casualty toll - which
went down from 62 earlier yesterday -
could not be independently confirmed. The
official Serb toll from last week listed 46
Albanians and six Serb police killed in both
sweeps.
Maloku said some ethnic Albanians man-
aged to view bodies of those killed when they
were in the Pristina morgue. Police moved the
bodies Sunday evening to the town of Srbica,
the center of last week's crackdown, 25 miles

'U' political science
Prof. Organski dies

By Peter Meyers
Daily Staff Reporter
A.F.K. Organski, a professor of political science
known at the University for his engaging teaching
style and mischievous sense of humor, died March
5 while skiing in Vail, Colorado.
Organski had been on vacation during the
University's spring break. This past Wednesday
during break, he was feeling ill and was taken to
the hospital. Thursday night he suffered a massive
heart attack and died at the hospital. He was 74.
"We're just staggered," said Samuel Eldersveld,
a former University professor of political science.
"He was a very healthy, active type person."
"He had a wonderful, bright, lively sense of
humor," said political science Prof. Ronald
Inglehart. "He had a teasing, sort of joking style.
He had a very Italian personality."
Eldersveld was chair of the political science
department when Organski joined the faculty in
1965.
"He was a person who did an awful lot for our
teaching," Eldersveld said, adding that he was
immediately very popular with both graduates and
undergraduates. "They really loved him and
enjoyed him tremendously."
Academically, Organski did most of his work in

the field of political development.
"He wrote one of the significant books in the
field, 'Stages of Political Development,' about 30
years ago," Eldersveld said.
Inglehart said Organski used to tell a stories of
playing with the children of Benito Mussolini.
Organski was born in Poland and raised in Rome.
"He was a playmate of Bruno Mussolini,"
Inglehart said. One day, Organski, the young
Mussolini and another boy were all playing in
Mussolini's backyard. Bruno's mother called for
the boys to come inside. When they didn't
respond, she came out and slapped all three of
them, Inglehart said.
Organski, who was Jewish, fled to the United
States with his family to avoid the Holocaust.
Organski had been teaching two courses in
political development this semester. Prof,
John Jackson, chair of the political science
department, said neither class would be can-
celed. The department is presently looking for
substitute lecturers to finish the semester -
preferably graduate students who were famil-
iar with Organski's work.
Funeral services are scheduled for 1 p.m.
tomorrow at St. Andrew's Episcopal Church.
A memorial service will be held on March 18.

r (- l'",, A
AP PHOTO
Albanians unload a body of a compatriot yesterday, in the town of Scbica. The man was killed
in clashes with Serb security forces in the village of Donji Prekaz last week.
west of Pristina, and patrolled the region yes- protruding from a single long, white sheet. A
terday. tractor lumbered in, dumping another corpse.
Still, an Associated Press Television crew Police allowed the APTV crew to film only
and AP photographer got through to Srbica. In one body, which they claimed was that of
a rain swept construction yard, dozens of bod- Adem Jashari, who Serbs say was the leader
ies were lined up in two rows, heads and limbs of the Kosovo Liberation Army.

ROSE
Continued from Page 1
few glorious days, essentially renders the rest of the sports world moot.
There's nothing better than pouring over the brackets, filling them out step
Sy step, rushing to tell your friends about the brilliant upset you've pegged
in the first round of the East Regional ... and then grabbing a new sheet to
do it all again.
It's not enough to just enter a pool. You have to fill out as many brackets
as you can possibly find - each with different winners, of course, with the
idea that some permutation of picks will increase the chances you'll be right
in at least one scenario. That way, when you're discussing the first-round
upsets after the fact, you can say with some certainty, "Oh yeah, I had San
Francisco over Utah in the first round," or, "Of course Northern Arizona was
gonna knock off Cincinnati -- I had that in my pool."
"Phis year, it's even more exciting around here, with five teams from this
Sate getting into the field for the first time ever. Michigan, Michigan State,
Eastern Michigan, Western Michigan and Detroit are all invited to the
Dance. So everybody has someone to root for.
It's better than football's bowl season because 64 teams, not just two
or three, have a chance to finish in first place; it's better than hockey and
baseball because everyone is talking about it.
The anticipation comes to a boil on Thursday, when the actual games
get underway. So just in case you needed a reason to skip class on a

dreary day in March, beginning at around noon this Thursday there will
be four of them every couple hours.
And once it starts, it just keeps getting better. There's nothing like the first
weekend, when the games never stop and the upsets seem to pour in every
few hours. Of course, the down side to all of this is that by Friday afternoon,
most people will be eliminated from most of the pools they've entered, but
hey, that's part of the fun, too.
Right now, students at this university are in a unique situation. For lit-
tle kids, this week is about heroes and future dreams; for grown-up
types, it's about remembering tournaments of years ago. But for college
students, it's about classmates. It's a brief but magical time when the
guys on TV, playing in the biggest tournament of them all, are in the
same stage of life as you are - or even, on occasion, in the same
Kinesiology lecture as you are.
The men's basketball team is on a roll, and it's led by some special play-
ers -- players who so far in their careers seem to thrive in spotlight situa-
tions.
And right now, the spotlights are warming up. By Friday, when
Michigan faces Davidson in Atlanta, the lights will be hot and the action
will be furious. And even though not everyone can head across the coun-
try to watch the Wolverines - or the Spartans, or the Eagles, or
whomever - everyone can, in the meantime, feel a tiny part of it by
watching the games with a few filled-out brackets on the table nearby.
-Jim Rose can be reached atjwrose@umich. edu.

POWER
Continued from Page 1
"These are four big priorities and four things I
really would like to spend another eight years work-
ing on'" Power said. "We have a lot of work to do
with diversity. The University is under assault for its
policies on affirmative action."
Power said he also would like to see University
research findings move "from the lab into the mar-
ketplace" for greater economic development.
Allocating a portion of tuition funds to increase
financial aid is another plank in Power's campaign.
"There is also the question of how to keep edu-
cation affordable for middle class families," Power
said. "I think these issues have been around for a
long time and I expect there will be discussion
about them."
Former Regent Dean Baker (R-Ann Arbor),
who has said he will run for re-election this year,
said he was not surprised by Power's decision.
"It's entirely suspected and no surprise," said
Baker, who lost a re-election bid in 1996. "Phil has
been a regent for many years and I did work with
him."
Power has formed a committee to support

his re-election efforts, co-chaired by Regent
Olivia Maynard (D-Goodrich) and Bill
Beckham, president of New Detroit - an
organization that is working on the renais-
sance of Detroit.
"The focus of the committee is two fold," Power
said. "It is to gain broad support from all parts of
the party and to gain access and to those (involved)
for their advice and their help."
Power said he asked Maynard to co-chair the
committee because of her experience in campaign-
ing for the Democratic Party.
"She has very deep and broad experience in the
party" Power said.
While the Michigan Republican Party has
announced four candidates - Baker, state
Rep. Jessie Dalman (R-Holland), David
Brandon, former Michigan Republican Party
finance chair, and Engineering junior Jim
Riske - Power is currently the only Michigan
Democratic Party candidate for nomination to
run in the November election.
"Another candidate will be announced by
the filing date, May 12," said Miyoshi Shaw,
communications director for the Michigan
Democratic Party.

11 Applications for

D'

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LAW FIRM, FULL TIME, paid assistant RUN YOUR OWN SUMMER BUSINESS.
position available, no prior experience Lawn sprinkler installation & sales. Earn up
necessary. Must be available for summer and to $10,000. Vehicle req. You choose the
ensuing year, and part time training this location in Michigan or Ohio suburbs. Green-
spring. Fax resume to 313-662-3893 immed., land Irrigation 1-800-361-4074.
or send to 308 W. Huron, Ann Arbor, MI SECURITY GUARDS to work on U of M
;0103. Dr r ur r t
P/r1* ~ FT P I1 ~IIIlEL~.ILI~Jay

'1AINE CO-ED CAMP seeks instructors for
athletics, water skiing, creative & performing
arts, tennis, backpacking, high-
ropeswindsurfing, gymnastics, & riding. 6/
17-8123, age 20+. Contact 2807 C Delmar
Drive, Columbus, OH 43209. 800-959-3177
or fax 614-253-3661. See our web site
www.campwekeela.com or email us at
Wekeela@aol.com
MINUTES TAKER NEEDED for Michigan
Student Assembly every Tuesday at 7:30 pm.
For info. call 763-3241. Last meeting: April
14.
NEED SOCCER COACHES. 7 wk. session
gins mid-April ends early June. $12/
"Vssion. More info. call 66A-AYSA.
NOW HIRING WAITSTAFF Part time
premier fine dining downtown Plymouth.
Phone 734-453-6260 for interview.
RESIDENT MANAGER:
To live on site in central campus Apt. Bldg.
Assist Property Manager with daily opera-
tions of small apt. bldgs. Duties include:
mior maintenance, minor cleaning, showing
of properties. 10-12 Hours per week
anticipated. Great opportunity for very ma-
ture individual or couple. Position begins
august 1998. Call Ann: 426-6035.

campus. Y or r/ 1. errmanent or temporary.
Appy at State Security Services, 525 Church
St. 998-7201. E.O.E.
SEVERAL POSITIONS w/ start up
software company. Doing product
development, data based administration.
Must know Oracle7, SQL, PIJSQL, Oracle
Forms. 769-6042.
SPECIAL GIFT-We're looking for healthy
women between the ages 21-35 for egg
donation. All ethnic backgrounds are
encouraged. Fee paid. Send inquiries to
AARMA, P.O. Box 2674, Ann Arbor, MI
48106.
SUBJECTS NEEDED
For Cognitive Psychology Reaction Time
Experiment. Male or female, right-handed,
native English speaker, normal vision &
hearing
Pay $.75/hr. or by experiment.
Call 936-2056.
SUM. EMPLOYMENT: our co. is currently
seeking Resident Coordinators & sum. office
support to help coordinate an interim
program for a "Big Three" auto company.
Upperclassmen & alumnae pref. Please fax
your resume to 248-855-9846, attn. Carrie
Crutchfield.

SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS
NEEDED FOR PREMIERE CAMPS
IN MASSACHUSETTS
Positions for talented, energetic, and fun
loving students as counselors in all team
sports including Roller Hockey, all individual
sports such as Tennis & Golf, Waterfront &
Pool activities, and specialty activities
including art, dance, theatre, gymnastics,
newspaper & radio. TOP SALARIES, room,
board and travel. June 20th-August 19th.
Enjoy a great summer that promises to be
unforgettable. MAH-KEENAC (Boys): 1-
800-753-9118 DANBEE (Girls): 1-800-392-
3752.
SUMMER INTERNSHIPS + Fall/Winter
jobs available. Eam commission based pay at
The Michigan Daily selling advertising to lo-
cal and national businesses. Looking for
creative, ambitiousandshighly motivated
students. Call 764-0662. Application dead-
line extended to.March 16.
SUMMER JOBS & INTERNSHIPS in
Hospitality. Write/e-mail for free brochure.
NIS 711 Signal Mountain Rd., Ste. 155
Chattanooga, TN 37405. NISjobs@aol.com.
TEACHERSENEEDED - MCAT, LSAT,
GMAT, GRE, SAT, ACT. If you are a
dynamic and motivated person with high test
scores, you could teach for The Princeton
Review. Great pay, flexible hours. Call us
TODAY - 313/663-2163.
VOLUNTEERS WANTED. Cold study Vit.
C and Zinc. Med. Ctr. Gift certificates.
Call 936-6267 pager 2960.
WE ARE A REAL estate company looking
for a suprt person to do research and data
entry. This position is ideal for a student
looking for flexible hours. Will train the right
person. Please send resume to: Michigan
Commercial Realty, 1155 Rosewood, Suit B,
Ann Arbor, MI 48104. Attn: Office Manager.

are now being accepted

$ LOW FARES WORLDWIDE & Summer
Charters to Europe. Frankfurt from $629,
London from $449, Shannon from $429. In-
stant purchase Eurail sses. Regency Travel
209 S. State 665-6122.
$ STUDENTS Purchase your tickets with
Continental vouchers & Amex card. Regency
Travel 209 S. State St. 665-6122. Frances.
GRADUATION SPECIAL- 7 day end of
semester tour to Athens and Greek Isle. Air,
hotel, meals. $1289.00. Stamos Travel 663-
4400.
WINTER ESCAPE- Cozy log cabins on
lake. $54-79 ntly. Incl. hot tub, cross country
trails & more. Near downhill. Traverse City.
616/276-9502.

11

The Gargoyle is a magazine of humor with
commercial ublishing goals produced by stu-
dents at the niversity of Michigan. Fun in is
available and approved for the production of a
spring 1998 edition for those who apply early.
Future funding is also available. The offices of
the magazine are located at the Student
Publications Building, 420 Maynard Street.
Interested students may apply by submitting a
brief biography and an essay on why they would
like to be editor and why they would be suc-
cessful. Candidates will be evaluated on the
basis of talents in humor writing and editing
and evidence of organizational skills. On the
basis of the written application, candidates will
be invited to an interview. The successful candi-
date will be eligible for a $500 merit-based
scholarship.
Applications should be delivered or mailed to
the Board for Student Publications, Room
210E, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
48109-1327.
A non-discriminatory, affirmative action institution.

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music
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OATEOyt
HOMEWORK
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HUNDREDS OF INSTRUMENTS. Not
just guitars. Percusion & Wind. Herb David
Guitar Studio. 302 E. Liberty. 665-8001.
announcements

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Applications for

CHILD CARE CENTERS looking for
teacher for immediate and summer
employment. Full, part-time and substitute
positions available. Full time staff receive
salary and benefits. Part-time hrs. are
flexible. 761-2576.
CHILD CARE PROVIDER looking for
energetic, creative, loving person to take care
of 2 boys, 3 & 5 yrs. Pref. 2 days/wk. 6 hrs. at
a time. Flex. schedule. Call Diane in Saline at
429-2277.
GREAT PART-TIME JOB! Good y avto

!ATTN: VIDEO GRAPHERS! Film the
naked mile & make $$$. We pay $100-200/
hr. for good footage. Email us your ex-
perience REPLYTOO@HOTMAIL.COM.
START YOUR OWN FRATERNITY! Zeta
Beta Tau is looking for men to start a new
chapter. If you are interested in academic
success, a chance to network and an oppor-
tunity to make friends in a non-pledging
brotherhood, e-mail: zbt@zbtnational.org or
call Ferron Lewitt at (317) 334-1898.
YOGA TUESDAYS 12-1 p.m. First Con-
gregational Church State & Williams. To
register call 663-3798.

I1

are now being accepted.

rj

(A

E nomnwmmi

. 1. z mio

care for 9 yr. old boy approx. 10 nights/mo.
426-W99.personal
WANT TO BE A NANNY this summer?°
Call Child Care Solutions at 734-668-6882.
http://www.pub.
i imich..adu/daiv/ ADOPTION: LOVING COLLEGE edu-

Students with business and organizational talents are
invited to apply for the position of business manager of
the Gargoyle.
The Gargoyle is a magazine of humor with commercial
publishing goals produced by students at the University
of Michigan. Funding is available and approved for the
production of a spring 1998 edition for those who apply
early. Future funding is also available. The offices of the
magazine are located at the Student Publications

DOG SCHOOL.

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