100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 26, 1998 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1998-02-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i r -t .IA -I- . :a=~ j- L_:;4 i'_w~z

0

-WU

IV

The Michigan Daily Weekend

--+.

10B - I ne lictiganlai y weekenm Magazine -Tursay, t-ebruary 2t; 1---- - ----- ----
A weekly guide to who's
H s rwhere, what's happening and
HE Ia.chy you need to be there ...

TOTALLY '80S
Smurfs, G.I. Joes in hand, students Hot Whe

Saturday
CAMPUS CINEMA
Touch of Evil (1958)
Classic director Orson
Welles' last Hollywood
film, about a confusing
murder investigation in
Mexico. Mich. 4:45 and
9:30 p.m.
Cape Fear (1962)
Original version of the
1991 Scorsese-directed
remake, about a
deranged killer who
stalks a family. Mich. 7
p.m.
MUSIC
Howling Diablos Howl
the night away with the
Diablos, one of Ann
Arbor's favorite local
bands. With special
guest Gods Made Love.
Blind Pig. 9:30 p.m.
996-8555.
Blessed Union of Souls "I
believe" this soulful pop
group is ready for another
hit. The Palladium,
Roseville. 7 p.m. $15.
(810) 778-8151.

THEATER
Orpheus in the
Underworld See
Thursday. 8 p.m.

Inverted Pyramid
Thursday. 8 p.m.

See
$12.

ALTERNATIVES
Storytelling Workshop
Storyteller Jay O'Callahan
leads a workshop explor-
ing sound, rhythm and
imagery. Must pre-regis-
ter. The Ark. 9 a.m.- noon.
$30.
Natural Dance
Workshop promoting
physical, emotional and
spiritual strength
though dance. Jewel
Heart Tibetan Buddhist
Center, 211 E. Ann St.
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. $25.
996-9006.
Museurn Concer t The
Old West Baroque
Ensemble performs at
the Toledo Museum of
Art. 3 p.m. Free. (419)
255-8000.
MFA Thesis Concert
See Thursday. 8 p.m.

By Joanne AlnajJar
Daily Arts Writer
If there was ever a time where Sit
'n' Spins, the A-Team and Boy
George inspired a generation of peo-
ple to enjoy life, it was the '80s. And
while today's University students
look towards the future daily, they
regularly revel in nostalgia.
Scott Greig, manager of the
Nectarine Ballroom, said his cus-
tomers avidly celebrate past eras.
"Look how popular all kinds of
music are now from the past," said
Greig, mentioning "jazz, big band,
ballroom dancing is popular, and
martini clubs."
The Nectarine Ballroom features
music from the '70s and '80s every
Saturday. "It's a very popular night
here," said Greig, who said the night
attracts dancers from several genera-
tions.
"We have people in here who are
18 to 40, and everybody likes (the
music) because they pretty much
remember it," he said. "Take Billy
Idol's 'White Wedding' ... if you're
20 and that happened 15 years ago,
you remember it 'cause your broth-
ers and sisters and parents were lis-
tening to it. If you're 30 like me, you
were in high school, and that's what
was on the radio."
Kaleidoscope Books and
Collectibles, located on South
State Street, is another local
business pushing the '80s to
nostalgic patrons. The store
buys and sells classic
memorabilia from this
time period, among
others. G.1. Joe
lunchboxes, Hot
Wheels cars and
Sesame Street
stuffed animals
crowd the shelves
of the small store,u
with higher price
tags than one would
have seen a decade
ago.
A case of Smurf
figurines greets entering customers.
Mary Lou Lagler, a clerk at
Kaleidoscope, said the Smurfs have
made the biggest comeback.
"They do really well ... it's surpris-
ing, the things that are popular," she
said. "We carried the Smurfs as an
experiment, and since then they've just
been selling really fast. Most of them
cost about $5, but the rare ones can
cost about $80."

-' = . . y 'f. ,-.--...- - -
Courtesy of Warmer Bros.
Some students may still listen to '80s rappers Run DVC, pictured above.

It isn't surprising that people are
willing to pay such high prices for
these toys, she said.
"They buy them because they loved
them as children and want to remember
the happiness it brought them," Lagler
said.
Some students see the '80s
revival reflected in a more adult
venue: fashion. Katy Glazer, a
first-year Art student,
explained her theory of this
trend: "It seems as though
every decade repeats
itself in increments. In
the early '90s, we
were seeing a lot of
'70s revival,"
Glazer said. "With
r the next millenni-
um coming, the
next decade that's
going to repeat
itself? It won't be
the '90s 'cause it'll be
too close, so basically it
has to be the '80s.
DANA IUNNANE/Da Iy "That's why they're
coming back so strong,
and it's due time for the '80s to repeat
itself."
Stephanie Early, an LSA first-year
student, said the current trend to repeat
the past is merely a reflection of what
this decade is about. "The '70s were
the hippie, bell-bottom, hemp-neck-
lace, tie-dye, platform-shoe 'look.' But
the '90s also had many of the same
'looks' of the '70s and past decades ...
so I think the '90s are the melting pot

of past decades, especially the '70s and
'80s," Early said.
Another idiosyncrasy of these
decades was their movies - the film
era of teen angst, zits and ratted hair.
Glazer was brave enough to confess
that she, like many, enjoys a good '80s
movie every once in a while. "I like
watching them because they're so
cheesy and remind you of the first time
around when you saw them back then.
It's good nostalgia," she said.
The "classic" movies of the era are
not exactly collecting dust at local
video stores. "You have all the Brat
Pack 'Breakfast Club' type movies that
rent a lot, but the cheesy comedies that
you find on USA 'Up All Night' don't
rent at all. 'Pretty in Pink' and 'Sixteen
Candles' both rent pretty regularly,"
reports Kate Kehoe, a clerk at Liberty
Street Video.
But even amid this '80s madness,
students like Gopika Shah, a first-year
LSA student, have mixed feelings on
this revival. "I do think this revival is
present and it's cool when people like
Puff Daddy adapt it to the '90s style
and beat - it makes it new and inter-
esting," Shah said. "On the other hand,
I don't like movies from a while ago,
especially from the '80s. They're all
about the same things - high school
cliques - and that just gets repetitive,
boring and annoying."
But if students have anything to do
with it, these decades will not be fad-
ing any time soon. So dig out those
sweatbands, find those shiny red
belts and get ready to cut footloose.

Friday

CAMPUS CINEMA
Double Indemnity (1944) An
American classic that should not be
missed. Mich. 7 p.m.
The Killers (1946) Based on an
Ernest Hemingway short story, this
film noir depicts a murder story relat-
ed by an insurance agent. Mich.
9:15 p.m.
MUSIC
Solid Frog Forget Kermit the Frog -
try Ann Arbor's local musicians, Solid
Frog! Performing with special guest
Plumb Loco. Blind Pig. 9:30 p.m.
996-8555.
Smoking Popes Don't miss the Winter
Dance Party, with special guests

Menthol and Triplefast Action. Get
there early. The Shelter, Detroit. 6
p.m. $7. (313) 833-6873.
Andrew "Dice" Clay If you can take
it, don't miss this show. 9 p.m. State
Theater, Detroit. $35. (313) 961-
5450.
Roni Size Represent Jungle beats
from across the Atlantic. St.
Andrew's Hall, Detroit. 10 p.m. $5.
(313) 961-MELT.
THEATER
Orpheus in the Underworld See
Thursday. 8 p.m.
Inverted Pyramid See Thurday. 8 p.m. $12.
ALTERNATIVES
MFA Thesis Concert See Thursday. 8
p.m..

Weeke1n
M A G A Z I N E
fi aa 9 ' . i . .i k $ } a P k

WeekeAd Magazine Editors:

Emily Lambei

WeekeA Magazine Associate Editor: Christopher Tkaczyk.
Writers: Joanne Alnajjar, Caryn Burtt, Brian Cohen, Chris Farah, Diana Gross
Gina Rasmussen.
Photographers: Dana Linnane, Paul Talanian and Adriana Yugovich.
Cover photo by Adriana Yugovich: Brook Brown, an Art and Design junior, sh
Arts Editors: Bryan Lark and Kristin Long.

Courtesy of EMI Records
The members of the Blessed Union of Souls will play the Palladium on Saturday.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan