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February 17, 1998 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1998-02-17

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LOCAL/STATE
'Michigan legislators make high
marks on environmental card

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, February 17, 1998 - 7

Going up for two!

By Mike Spahn
Daily Staff Reporter
Michigan has long been a site of conflict
over environmental issues, and its members of
congress present the varied opinions of the
state's residents.
While most of Michigan's national legisla-
tors scored high on the National
Environmental Scorecard, an indicator of sup-
port for environmental issues sponsored by the
League of Conservation Voters, others showed
clear support for other interests.
"Overall, we're really happy with the scores
that our representative got," said Mary Beth
Doyle, spokesperson for the Ecology Center of
Ann Arbor.
U.S. Rep. Lynn Rivers (D-Ann Arbor), who
represents the area encompassing the University,
.received a score of 88 percent. Betsy Loilos, a
political analyst for the LCV, said Rivers has con-
sistently shown support for environmental issues.
"Rivers was willing to cast some difficult

votes on the environment,' Loilos said.
Rivers said her district is concerned with the
environment, and scores on the evaluation are
usually reflective of a representative's con-
stituency.
"The 13th (congressional) district is very
much a green one," Rivers said. Legislators
"vote their districts."
Rivers said someone who does not support
environment-friendly legislation would have a
"very tough time" getting elected in her district.
Sen. Carl Levin received a rating of 71 per-
cent on the scorecard and Sen. Spencer
Abraham got a 14-percent rating.
"Cart Levin took quite a plunge, going from
93 percent to 71 percent," said Lisa Wade, a
spokesperson for the LCV
Loilos said Abraham's score was "hardly a
surprise."
"It was very clear when he ran that he did
not support environmental issues. He never
attempted to reach out to environmental

issues," Loilos said.
Overall, the Michigan delegation scored just
above the national average in the House of
Representatives, but the combined score for
Michigan senators Levin and Abraham was
below the average.
"In Michigan, there's often a view that envi-
ronmental protection hurts business," Doyle
said. "But I don't think that's the case."
Legislators were scored based on the votes
they cast on the most important environmental
issues of 1997, including air quality, global
warming and nuclear waste. Twenty-seven
environmental and conservation groups decid-
ed which votes were considered.
"There's a lot of politics that go behind every
vote," Doyle said. "This is a relatively good
reflection, but it's not perfect."
Loilos said the scorecard is the "best
indicator there is" for judging members of
Congress on their commitment to the envi-
ronment.

Some oppose sanctions

IRAQ
Continued from Page 1
"The word Iraq conjures images of
the enemy," Rafeeq said.
Despite her Arab heritage, Heidi
Arraf, president of the University's
American Arab Anti-Discrimination
Committee, said she believes this is not
an issue of politics or heritage.
No matter what one's political view-
point is, "it is a humanitarian issue. We
can't keep turning our backs on it every
day ... innocent people are suffering
unnecessarily," said Arraf, an LSA senior.
"Nothing is worth the killing of even
one human soul," Arraf said.
Randy Bond, a delegate from Voices
in the Wilderness, an organization com-
. mitted to humanitarian relief in Iraq,
spoke about his personal experience in
the country.
"I found it hard to look (the Iraqi peo-
ple) in the face and know what my

country has done to their children,"
Bond said. "Five thousand children die
every month as a result of the sanctions
... If we starve them to death, if we kill
them with disease, it doesn't seem to be
a problem."
Inflation in Iraq's economy since the
Persian Gulf War has risen at such high
rates that government-run agencies are
no longer able to provide adequate ser-
vices to citizens, Bond said.
Bond said that even Iraqi hospitals
are desolate.
"Cabinets are literally empty, with
only 5-10 percent of necessary sup-
plies," Bond said,
A documentary shown at the teach-in
mirrored Bond's account. University
students wept as disease-stricken chil-
dren flashed across the screen.
"The film was such a graphic por-
trayal, I cried." said LSA senior Kathryn
Sabbeth "It made me realize my ideas
are grounded in something real."

WIN
Continued from Page 1
n't really think we would get picked."
To become members of the audience, Silver and Wilson wait-
ed in line for several hours to pick up tickets. Then, they had to
wait in line again to be interviewed by producers of the show.
"The interviews were only about 20 seconds, but one of
the questions was your occupation," Silver said. "I said I
wanted to be a game show host but the University of
Michigan doesn't offer any classes in that."
Contestants are chosen based on their brief interviews, and
after Wilson heard Silver's interview he said he was opti-
mistic about Silver's chances of being picked.
"I think Adam made a great first impression in his inter-
view," Wilson said.
In the first round of play, Silver successfully estimated the
price of a sofa, which is expected to be delivered within days.
The next round was the game "One Away," where Silver
had to guess one number above or one number below each
digit of the price of a new car. The audience tried to get him
to change the number seven, but Silver looked instead to his
friend who called out to change the number three.
Wilson said he was thrilled when he saw his friend win the
sedan.
"I couldn't believe it. I thought I was dreaming," Wilson said.
"After I won the car, Bob Barker commented to the audi-
ence that (the Michigan football team) had really kicked
some butt," Silver said. "He was a really nice guy."
Immediately after the show, Silver said he called his moth-
er to tell her about the car. He said he told her, "You know
how you said I might get a car next year, well ..."
At first she did not believe him, but Silver eventually man-
aged to convince her of his luck. His fraternity brothers acted
differently.
"I couldn't believe it when he told me. I thought he was
making up a story," said LSA sophomore Eric Slaim. "I've
known Adam my whole life and it didn't seem very real. He's
very lucky."

AP PHOTO
Damon Bressler, age 15, goes up for a shot on a basketball court at St. Mary's Park In Monroe;
Mich.

_=-POLICY
Continued from Page 1
"The administration, I think, has a very heavy responsibility now to articulate
with very great precision what our purposes are in Iraq," Hamilton told Secretary
of State Madeleine Albright, who trooped to Capitol H ill nearly every day last
Y week to talk about Iraq.
President Clinton plans to deliver a speech today at the Pentagon to make the
case for why the United States may launch air strikes on suspected sites in Iraq.

METRO
Continued from Page 1
Mellon said that the food court could also use a renovation.
"The airport is old and it really needs an upgrade," he said.
Despite the low ranking, Metro Airport has already started a
$1.6- million improvement plan that will eventually lead to
74 new gates and more than 1.6 million square feet.
"It's not the Ritz-Carlton of airports, but we're trying,"
Northwest spokesperson Jim Faulkner told The Detroit
News.
Northwest is the airport's largest carrier, responsible for 70
percent of Metro Airport's traffic.
-The Associated Press contributed to this report.

MAUDE'S
Continued from Page 1
opening will not have a significant
impact on their business.
"It probably won't affect us," said
Carol Reid, a hostess at Tio's
Restaurant on Huron Street.
Owners of businesses surrounding
Arriba's said they welcome the restaurant.
"Although we'll miss Maude's; we're
looking forward to the new establish-
ment," said Robert Overmyer, owner of
Overmyer's gallery on East Liberty St.

tt l

PART TIME CHILD CARE PROVIDER
wanted for 4, 6, & 7 yr. olds. 1 day/wk. 7
a m. to 4:30 p.m. Additional hrs. avail. if
desired. Non smkr. Car & ref. req. Great payl
Great kids! Call 662-1706.
PART-TIME OFFICE help wanted. Friend-
ly office looking for a team player to assist w/
a variety of office duties. $8/hr. Please call
Diehl Auto Parts @ 663-3303. Ask for
Jennifer.
UN YOUR OWN SUMMER BUSINESS.
Lawn sprinkler installation & sales. Earn up
to $10,000. Vehicle req. You choose the
location in Michigan or Ohio suburbs. Green-
land Irrigation 1-800-361-4074.
SAIL OR WINDSURF up north this
simmer, three instructors and head of sailing
needed. Counseling, swimming, biking, art
and other specialist positions also available.
On campus interviews at job fair 2/18.
Questions: Crystalaire Camp, 2768 South
Shore Road East, Frankfort, MI 49635 (616)
s52-7589; email khouston@manistee-
isd.k 12.rmi.us
SALAD BAR PREP PERSON needed for a
n busy kitchen. Full-time or part-time. Apply in
prson at the Produce Station 1629 S. State

SALES POSITIONS available for Spring/
Summer and Fall/Winter terms. Earn com-
mission-based pay at The Michigan Daily
selling advertising to local and national
businesses. Ideal for gaining business ex-
perience in a student run environment. Look-
ing for creative, ambitious and highly
motivated students. Call 764-0662. Ap-
plication deadline Feb. 27.
Summer
Groundskeeper Wanted
Responsible for maintaining campus ground and nurtur-
ing plant materials on campus. As seasons dictate,
assist with mowing, weed whipping, weeding; leaf pick-
up; shrub and flower bed clean-up; preparing for planting
flower bulbs; pruning ornamental trees an shrubs.
Duties also include litter pick-up. Pay starts at $7.00 per
hour; Application Deadline is 311398
Desired qualifications:
eendability
'Enthusiasm
'Genuine interest in creating
beautiful and safe campus area.
To Apply: call 763-5539
Or stop by UM Grounds Department office for an applica-
tion between 7:(dam-3:OOpm weekdays. Grounds &
Waste ManagementPlant Services Building (first floor)
111?lPalmer Dr. (behind the Power Center)

p

-A

SMALL ADVERTISING COMMUNICA-
TIONS company seeks PIT person for light
data entry & answering phones. 10-20 hrs./
wk. Dynamic, young environment. Call 769-
9453 & ask for Tricia.
SPECIAL GIFT-We're looking for healthy
women between the ages 21-35 for egg
donation. All ethnic backgrounds are
encouraged. Fee paid. Send inquiries to
AARMA, P.O. Box 2674, Ann Arbor, MI
48106.
STUDENT PROGRAMMERS WANTED
The Business School is now hiring students
for short-term programming projects. Ex-
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oriented development environments, and
Windows95 are required. Flexible hours, be-
tween 8-5 weekdays. Minimum commitment
of 15 hours per week - more hours if desired.
Potential for continuing assignments. You
may e-mail your resume to
maryw@umich.edu or you may apply in per-
son at: Computing Services, Room C 1420
Kresge Library Building, 700 E. University.
SUMMER CAMP POS-TIONS: Make a
difference in the life of a child! Summer
therapy camp for handicapped children. Lo-
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Bay, MI. Positions avail. for Counselors,
Waterfront, Instructors for Nature/Arts &
Crafts/Recreation/Canoeing/Kayaking,
Nurses, Therapists, Food Service, &
Auxiliary. Must be enthusiastic, responsible
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room & board, and exp. of a lifetime
provided. Call/Write for application & info.
Bay Cliff Health Camp, 310 W. Washington,
Ste. 300, Marquette, MI, 49855, 906-228-
5770.
SUMMER JOBS & INTERNSHIPS in
Hospitality. Write/e-mail for free brochure.
NIS 711 Signal Mountain Rd., Ste. 155
Chattanooga, TN 37405. NISjobs@aol.com.
SUMMER JOBS IN COLORADO
Large resort seeks team of 170+ staff. Enjoy
activities such as hiking, mtn. biking,
volleyball, campfires, basketball, swimming,
sight seeing, etc. Come & see us at the Intern/
Summer Job fair on Weds. Feb. 18th,
Michigan Union. Snow Mountain Ranch,
YMCA of the Rockies. (970) 887-2152.
SUMMER OF A LIFETIME!! Timber
Lake-Tyler Hill Camps (NY/PA): Counselors
& Specialists for Atheletics, Crafts,
Waterfront, Ropes, Theater & morel TOP
SALARIES, Travel $$, Room/Board. For an
on-campus interview, FEB. 25, Call (800)
828-CAMP. Check out our WEBSITE AT
WWW.CAMPTLC.COM
TELE INVITER No sales, flex. daytime hrs.
Salary plus bonus. Call Beth at 995-1162,

TELEMARKETERS. This may be your op-
portunity to join a successful & expanding
Washtenaw Mortgage team. We are looking
for motivated & phone-gifted people. Part-
time flexible evening hours, $ -hr. with
incentives. EOE To apply please send resume
to HR Dept. Washtenaw Mortgage Co. 315
E. Eisenhower Ste. 12 Ann Arbor, MI 48108
or fax to 734-662-9517. www.mtgbank.com
VAN DRIVER NEEDED to transport local
shelter families, part-time, 20-30 hrs./wk.,
a.m. & p.m. hours, flexible schedule neces-
sary Call Doug 668-8823.

NICE TOGA
FLOOD 801

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Michigan Model Search
Female swimsuit models
needed for 1999 Michigan
Outdoors Pinup Calendar
Excellent pay while
having fun in the sun
Interested candidates must
submit a head shot plus a full
body shot in swimming attire.'
Name, address, daytime
phone number, and body
measurements by Apr. 1 to:
PM Photography P.O. Box
641 Dearborn, MI 48121.
All applicants must be 18
years or older.

ACTIVE, ENTHUSIASTIC child care
provider for our home. 20 hrs./wk 663-9354.
AFTERSCHOOL CHILDCARE for 2 girls
Tues. 4-7pm in NW A2 Additional after-
noons or wkdays possible Car req. 665-2037.
BABYSITTER WANTED 2 mornin s a
week. $6/hr., references and car required.
Call Karla @ 998.0464
CHILD CARE CENTERS looking for
teacher for immediate and summer
employment. Full, part-time and substitute
positions available. Full time staff receive
salary and benefits. Part-time hrs. are
flexible.
DAY CARE ASST. Own Transportation.
Part-Time. Flex./hrs. 663-1727.
ENTHUSIASTIC, RESP., exp. person to
care for our adorable 4-mo.-old in our Saline
home or yours. F/T M-F, start April. N-smkr.
734-944-2914, refs. red.r
WANT TO BE A NANNY this summer?
Call Child Care Solutions at 734-668-6882.

$ LOW FARES WORLDWIDE & Summer
Charters to Europe. Instant purchase Eurail
passes. Regency Travel 209 S. State 665-
6122.
$ SPRING BREAK Acapulco from $559.
Quad. Puerto Vallarta from $629 Quad. Can-
cun from $520. Double Call Dan Regency
Travel 665-6122. 209 S. State Street.
$ STUDENTS Purchase your tickets with
Continental vouchers & Amex card. Regency
Travel 209 S. State St. 665-6122. Frances.
***SPRING BREAK '98 GET GOING!!!
Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas & Florida. Group
Discounts & Free Drink Parties! Sell 5 & go
free! Visa/MC/Disc/Amex 1-800-234-7007.
www.endlesssummertours.comn.
BIG TEN Tournament tix wanted top dollar
paid. Tower Tickets 312/454-1300.
CANCUN Round trip tickets spring break
week. Best offer. 313-761-6450.

1 music

Gulf Front Accommodations
-Free Passes to the Super
Clubs ...Right Next Door
-Daily Activities & Giveaways!

1.800-224-GULF
www.BOARDWALKBEACHRESORT~com . " 'wsan
TRAVEL FREE! If you get 15 people art
our tours for action-packed 18-35's. Stamop
Travel in Ann Arbor. Ask for Helen 663.
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WINTER ESCAPE- Cozy log cabins or
lake. $54-79 ntly. Incl. hot tub, cross'countr)
trails & more. Near downhill. Traverse City
616/276-9502.

PANAMA CITY BEACH, FL. Your Spring
Break headquarters. El Dorado Travel Inn.
Make your reservations today! 1-800-220-
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SPRING BREAK- Bahamas, Jamaica,
Cruises, Snowshoe, www.gatomet.com 1-
800-881-8687.
SPRING BREAK - Cancun ands Nassau
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Call 1-888-Spring Break
1-888-777-4642.
Ultimate Spring
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98 Party Package includes:

LESSONS-STRING-WIND-PIANO. You
can p lay today - Herb David Guitar Studio
302 E. Liberty 665-8001.

-

F~~

rooT

THOUGH SUFFERING INTENSE TEASING FOR MOST OF
HIS LIFE ABOUT HIS SHORT TOGA, NOAH STILLT
CONTINUED TO BELIEVE IN HIS FLOOD THEORY.

CANCUN!. AIR, HOTEL, meals & drinks.
$219/person. For more info. call Surf & Sun

3 HOUSEMATES needed in 5 bdrm. hse
Call Cheri @ 327-0019 or Jen @ 99,4723.
ROOM OR ROOMMATE NEEDED o
Fall '98/Winter '99. Call Barb @ 913-19024.

.

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