100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 02, 1998 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1998-02-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

w ew

LOCAL/S TATE

The Michigan Daily - Monday, February 2, 1998- 7A

:Bollinger b
=BOLLINGER
Continued from Page 1A
the Master Plan, designed to bring
cohesion to the University community,
and also push for more research in all
-academic areas.
Bollinger said he wants to expand
his own knowledge of science-related
fields.
"I have been made more conscious of
my ignorance of the University. I feel
very close to the humanities but I know
I just don't have the feel for the sciences
that I think I should," Bollinger said. "I
'need to have a greater sense of what's
exciting, what is the potential."
Bollinger related his desire to
improve his scientific knowledge with
his attempt to understand the
;University's research departments.
"We shall be working toward a closer
.partnership with the deans of the vari-
ous schools and colleges in facilitating
and supporting the development of new
.research directions;" said Vice President
for Research Frederick Neidhardt.
In an attempt to bridge the gap
between the president and the academ-
ic community, Bollinger said he may
move his office out of the Fleming
,,Administration Building to an area
more accessible to the student body.
Although a site has not yet been cho-
'sen, Lisa Baker, associate vice president
for University relations, said it is impor-
tant to be close to the student body.
"Certainly being in closer proximity
"'to students -- in whatever he can
*achieve -- that is important" Baker
said.
While Bollinger has withstood
media attention and unexpected obsta-
- -eles, he also has faced personal chal-
lenges that he did not anticipate.
Balancing his responsibilities as
,president of the University with his
i I
FREE T-SHIRT
+$1000
Credit Card fundraisers for
fraternities, sororities, & groups.
Any campus organization can
raise up to $1000 by earning a
whopping $5.00/VISA application.
Call 1-800-932-0528 ext. 65.
Qualified callers receive
FREE T-SHIRT.
I;GET PAID TO HAVE FUN! CAMP
MATAPONI
4A girls camp in Maine has over 50
summertime openings for female and male
'siaft for Watersports, Landsports, Tennis,
Ropes Course, Arts & Crafts and much more.
Top S. Room/board and travel expense
provided. On campus interviews will be
,conducted. For more info, call 609-424-2755
;or email us at: mataponi@aol.com or look us
.up at www.mataponr.com
HAVE AN AMAZING SUMMER! Coed
,camp in Massachusetts seeks caring &
'motivated college students who love kids!
neral & specialty counselors needed. Join
dedicated team. Competitive salaries +
room+ board+ travel. 800-762-2820.
JOB OPPORTUNITY for someone with a
,great deal of computer knowledge at Stamos
Travel. Full or part-time. Ask for Helen 663-
4400.
JOBS! JOBS! JOBS!
Chat with famous UM Alumni, enhance your
resume while you earn some extra cash!!
***Telefund needs you!*** Flexible evening
hours, paid training. $6.50+/hr., to start,
' bonuses galore!!
f'al998-7420 for more info or stop by 611
Church #304.
,IOOKING FOR STUDENT to work part-

time for 2 investment advisors. Flexible
hours, pay negotiable. For info. contact Chris
-at 741-2632. EOE.
MACKINAC ISLAND RESORT HOTEL-
Seeking summer staff-front desk, dining
room, kitchen, & maintenance. Contact Iro-
gquois Hotel winter office (in Ann Arbor) at
¢327=9660 or email at iroquoismw@aol.com
MUSIC INDUSTRY: bookin a ency seeks
.tems. Call Jeremy at 313/995-5777 after 11

uilds strong relations with students
duties as a father and a husband have
been difficult, Bollinger said, adding '
that his job has intruded on his familyx
- especially his wife, Jean.
"She is an artist and completely.
dedicated to her work, Bollinger said.
"We thought we could separate the
burdens and the interests of my posi--
tion. There is a cost to her that I really
want to recognize." "a

CLI MATE
Continued from Page IA
their greenhouse gas emissions was one
of the most debated topics at both the
Kyoto convention and the symposium.
Although total and per capita emis-
sions of developing nations are far lower
than those of developed nations, they are
not insignificant, and if left unchecked,
these emissions will continue to rise and
could cause an ecological disaster.
But developing countries are deter-
mined not to stay impoverished while
developed nations reap the benefits of
their high consumption lifestyles.
Atul Khare, United Nations
Permanent Mission of India counselor,
contrasted India with the United States,
saying that even as India's industries con-
tinue to grow, there is still "no compari-
son" between the two countries' amounts
of greenhouse gas emissions.
The symposium also touched on the
"clean development mechanism" - the
means by which greenhouse gas emis-
sions will be cut in individual countries.

"You need nmore than a target," said
Steve Schneider. a professor at Stanford
University and one of the world's lcad-
ing experts on climate changes. "ou
need a mechanism," Schneider saidZ:
In the United States, the clean devel-
opment mechanism will involve tax cuts
and deregulation for industries responsi-
ble for greenhouse gas emissions.
On the international scale, emissions
trading will allow developed nations-to
invest money in new, efficient technol-
ogy to reduce gas emissions in develop-
ing nations. This money would other-
wise be spent on reducing emissions in
developed countries, which is a much
more expensive process. This allows
funds to be used more efficiently. But
both of these mechanisms are far from
comprehensive and came under attack .
Despite these setbacks, Sandalow
said he was optimistic about the overall
outcome of the Kyoto agreement.
"The Kyoto protocol was an enor-
mous achievement," he said. "Kyoto
was about establishing a framework for
moving forward."

RelationshipS
Although a major initiative of
Bollinger's administration has been to
improve aspects of education, many stu-
dents said they recognize his attempts to
become accessible to the University
community -- including opening his
home to students after the Penn State
football victory in November and teach-
ing a class this past semester.
"I thought it was cool when he
opened his house after the Penn State
game," said LSA junior John Bahling.
"It showed he's not a guy on a
pedestal, but part of the University."
But Bollinger got off to a rocky start
with students when the student group
Latinos y Latinas Unidos for Change
protested during a student reception
with the president last spring, accusing
Bollinger of not responding to their
requests to meet with him.
Bahling said that by attending a vari-
ety of activities on campus, from con-
certs to athletic events, Bollinger has set
himself apart from past presidents.
"I don't think students pay as much
attention to what goes on in the admin-
istration, but students appreciate that he
opened his house," he said. "It gives
him a perspective on student life instead
of just sitting in an office in Fleming."
Athletic Director Tom Goss said
Bollinger is intelligent and thoughtful.
"One of his greatest assets is his abil-
ity to communicate to the students,"

MARGARET MYERS/Daily
University President Lee Bollinger invited about 1,000 students to celebrate
inside the President's House after Michigan's football victory over Penn State.

Goss said. "That will probably make
him one of our greatest presidents."
Vice President for Student Affairs
Maureen Hartford said Bollinger
strengthened his bond with the commu-
nity by not only opening his home dur-
ing good times, but by reaching out to
people during times of grief, including
attending events that commemorated
the life of LSA senior Tamara Williams,
who was murdered in September.
"I think both of these occasions tell
you a lot about him as a president and
as a person," I artford said. "[ie cares
abut (the students) and wants to be
involved in their lives."
Appointments
Aside from the events that have
forced Bollinger to react, he has still
moved forward by taking steps to

build a distinct administration.
In his first year leading the adminis-
tration, Bollinger created two new
positions and appointed three new
executive officers to top posts.
"I just can't speak highly enough
about the people who have taken these
positions," Bollinger said.
In addition to Cantor's appointment
as the University's second-in-com-
mand - the first woman to hold the
position - Bollinger made Robert
Kasdin the new Chief Financial
Officer and Tom Goss the Athletic
Department's new director.
Bollinger also appointed Gilbert
Omenn to the position of the vice pres-
ident for medical affairs, a post created
to link the Medical School and
University Hospitals with the entire
University.

ATHLETICS
Continued from Page IA
Mike Stevenson's expanded post will include overseeing recreational sports .nd
campus facilities.
Michigan men's basketball coach Brian Ellerbe, football coach Lloyd Carr,
women's basketball coach Sue Guevara and hockey coach Red Berenson will
report directly to Goss instead of associate administrators.
Madej said Goss' changes are not a reflection of problems within the department,
but just normal adjustments to operating under new management.®-
"I would never say there were problems, but that Tom feels that it's best wayTor
him to run the Athletic Department," Madej said.
University President Lee Bollinger said changes within departments expectedly
follow changes within the administration.
"It's perfectly consistent with what I wanted from the beginning, which is to have
very talented individuals come and look at their respective organizations ... and to
think about how it should be structured," Bollinger said.
Michigan men's swimming coach Jon Urbanchek said that although the changes
will help the department achieve its long-term goals, it is unfortunate that some mem-
bers of the staff have to be released.
"It's sad to see that changes have to be made, but I'm confident that we're mov-
ing forward here," Urbanchek said.
-Daily Sport Editor Dan Stillman contributed to this report.

PATIENT ATTENDANTS
The University of Michigan
Health System
Seeking candidates to provide observation,
companionship and assistance with specific
patient care needs. Must be 18 years or older,
have good communication skills and read
and write English, access to transportation
and telephone. Must have no lifting.
restrictions. Starting salary $6.75 per hour
Applicants should send or fax their resume,
or call:
Central Staffing Resource
The University of Michigan
Health System
C108 MIB
1500 E. Medical Center Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0823
Phone (734) 936-9399
FAX: (734) 936-7832
A NON-DISCRIMINATORY,
AFFIRMATIVE
ACTION EMPLOYER.
PETCARE ANIMAL CLINIC is accepting
applications for part-time positions. Apply at
2894 Washtenaw, Ypsilanti. 434-9055.
m-r Child Care Providers:
.*Full-time
" Part-time
"-Occasional babysitting
. $7/hr. and up
CALL CHILD CARE SOLUTIONS
(734) 668-6882
Positions in private homes.
Child care references required.
Will CPR train qualified applicants.
Must be 18 yrs. or older.
No cost to you.
RUN YOUR OWN SUMMER BUSINESS.
Lawn sprinkler installation & sales. Earn up
to $10,000. Vehicle req. You choose the
location in Michigan or Ohio suburbs. Green-
land Irrigation 1-800-361-4074.
SALES POSITIONS available for Spring/
Summer and Fall/Winter terms. Earn com-
mission-based pay at The Michigan Daily
selling advertising to local and national
businesses. Ideal for gaining business ex-
perience in a student run environment. Look-
ing fo.r creative, ambitious and highly
motivated students. Call 764-0662. Ap-
plication deadline Feb. 27.
SCOREKEEPERS is now hiring part-time
cook for fall & winter terms. No experience
needed but helpful. Flexible hours, great so-
cial atmosphere. Apply today at 310
Maynard next to Kinkos. Ask for Matt 995-
0100.

SPECIAL GIFT-We're looking for healthy
women between the ages 21-35 for egg
donation. All ethnic backgrounds are
encouraged. Fee paid. Send inquiries to
AARMA, P.O. Box 2674, Ann Arbor, MI
48106.
SPORTS MINDED hiring immed. 6-8 en-
thusiastic individuals for our Ann Arbor
office. No exp. nec. will train. Full or part
time. $12-15/hr. 913-5995.
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS
NEEDED FOR PREMIERE CAMPS IN
MASSACHUSETTS
Positions for talented, energetic, and fun
loving students as counselors in all team
sports including Roller Hockey, all individual
sports such as Tennis & Golf, Waterfront and
Pool activities, and specialty activities
including art, dance, theatre, gymnastics,
newspaper & radio. TOP SALARIES, room,
board, and travel. June 20th-August 19th.
Enjoy a great summer that promises to be
unforgettable. MAH-KEE-NAC (Boys): I-
800-753-9118 DANBEE (Girls): 1-800-392-
3752. www.campmkn.oom
SUMMER COUNSELORS
Outstanding 8-week girl's camp in Maine
needs female and male instructors in tennis,
swim, land sports, all arts, gymnastics, water
sports, office, nanny, group leaders and more.
Tripp Lake Camp, Poland Maine. Call 800-
997-4347 or 888-617-7477,
www.tripplakecamp.com
TEACHING ASSIT. for preschool, Wed.
11:30-3. Other occas. hrs. as substitute if
avail. Responsible, fun job. Need reliable
trans. 665-5175.
TELEMARKETERS.This may be your op-
portunity to join a successful & expanding
Washtenaw Mortgage team. We are looking
for motivated & phone-gifted people. Part-
time flexible evening hours, $8-1O/hr. with
incentives. pOE To apply please send resume
to HIR Dept. Washtenaw Mortgage Co. 315
E. Eisenhower Ste. 12 Ann Arbor, MI 48108
or fax to 734-662-9517. www.mtgbank.com
TITLE INSURANCE AGENCY needs
part-time workers with title, real estate or
mortgage processing exp. 20 hrs./wk. $8.50
to $10.50/hr. Full-time in Summer/Post
Graduate. Good keyboard skills a plus. Send
resume to: Liberty Title Co., 111 N. Main,
Ann Arbor MI 48104.
WAITSTAIA F needed. Must be reliable,
energetic and Driver's License. Full or Part
time with flexible hours. Call 746-2142.
WANT TO MAKE SOME EXTRA
CASH? Young Judea is looking for a part
time Office Manager in Ann Arbor. Required
skills include: Macintosh, typing, and a
flexible schedule for 30 hours per week.
Preferred skills include: Previous office ex-
perience and bookkeeping. For additional in-
formation please call Debi Banooni at (313)
994-8500.

UMI IS AN ESTABLISHED information
services company with operations throughout
the world. The International Sales and
Marketing department is seeking to fill one
40 hrs./week position of one paid intern star-
ting February, 1998 or as soon as possible.
The individual should have a strong interest
in the international market, be very organized
and able to handle many projects at once, and
be willing to take on a wide range of tasks. A
background in business, knowledge of a
foreign language, and experience living or
studying abroad are also preferred.
All interested persons should send or fax a
cover letter and resume to:
UMI
International Sales and Marketing
300 N. Zeeb Road
Ann Arbor, MI 48103
Fax: 313-973-7007
WANTED: STUDENT for P/T employment
(15-20 hrs./wk.) for 6 mos. (maybe longer)
starting asap. PC skills including software
installation, & familiarity w/ WIN95/NT.
Valid driver's license. Good comm. skills are
essential. $10-$ 1l/hr., depending on exp.
Please submit resume to Judith Flanders, M-
Pathways Project, University of Michigan,
3036 Ad Services Bldg., 1009 Green St. Ann
Arbor 48104-1432 or via email to
,udithf@umich.edu
WAREHOUSE
Attention Job Seekers! Do you need a
weekend job? The Meijer Distribution
Center in Newport, Michigan is looking for
hard working individuals to work Friday,
Saturday, and Sunday evenings.
Benefits include:
* Starting wage of $8.86/hour
* Shift premiums
* $275 incentive can be easily earned
* Medical/Dental benefits and 401(k)
* Additional shifts avail. during week
The position includes order selecting in a fast
paced food distribution center. We are
located at Exit 21 off of I-75. If you are
interested, please drop off a completed job
application (available to any Meijer location)
at the Security building.
Meijer, Inc.
8857 Swan Creek Road
Newport, MI 48166
BABYSIlTER for 1 & 3 yr. old 10-20 hrs.
Flex. time & pay. Must have ref. & car. N-
smkr. Call Kathleen 665-8987.
BABYSITTER NEEDED for 2 young kids.
Car needed. Spring/summer. 769-5949.
CHILD CARE & MOTHER'S HELPER
needed-part-time (15-20 hrs./wk. Mon. 12-
10pm nec., otherwise flex.) in Plymouth
home. Children ages 9, 8, 5. Exp. nec., ref.
req. Assist w/errands using my vehicle. Exc.
pay for the right person. Please call 313-329-
8009 & leave your name, no., & a time to call
you back.
OCCASIONAL BABYSITTER AM or PM
for 2 small children. Good -pay. Own trans. &
refs. needed. Call 761-7732.
ti L A Wickets & travel
SG }
$ LOW FARES WORLDWIDE Instant

***SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS Party
Cuisel 6 Days $2791 Includes Meals, Parties
& Taxes! Great Beaches & Nightlifel Leaves
from South Floridal sprin3breaktraveLcom 1-
800-678-6386.

CANCUN *BVIAA
24 HOURS OF
FREE DRINKS!
7 nights from $299!
" Includes RT air, hotel, 24 hours of
free drinks and weekly party sche
Se i

M
ed-
ni-ya

ule f s in break events! organie
15 f riends and Earn A Free Trip!
CLASS$ .4-avCI

- Space is limited! Call now!
or e-mail us at SALES@CLASSTRAVEL.cOM!
930 Commonweath Ave South. Boston,. MA 02215
Mon-Fn 9a-8p. Sat 12-4 ET
***SPRING BREAK '98 GET GOING!!!
Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas & Florida. Group
Discounts & Free Drink Parties! Sell 5 & go
free! Visa/MC/Disc/Amex 1-800-234-7007.
www.endlesssummertours.com.
**MICHIGAN SPRING BREAKERS!!!**
Baseball in AZ, FL, or UM in TX. Students,
Grad Students catch baseball spring training
in AZ, FL, or TX (March 28-Mar. 1).
Specialty Packages Available. Call Tour with
US at (313) 528-0583.

PANAMA CITY BEACH, FL. Your Spring
Break headquarters. El Dorado Travel Inn.
Make your reservations today! 1-800-220-
2811.
SELLING Sarah McLachlan tickets E.
Lansing. Call 313-4804332.
Ultimate Spring
Break Party Package!
'98 Party Package includes:
-Gulf Front Accommodations
-Free Passes to the Super
Clubs...Right Next Door
*Daily Activities & Giveaways!
1-800-224-GULF
www.BOARDWALKBEAcHRESORT.com .eattoS1a ~
TREK AMERICA Multi-activity Adventure
Tours-Hike, bike, horseback ride, raft &
more in America's most exquisite places.
USA, Canada, Alaska, Hawaii,Mexico,
Guatemala, Belizel TrekAmerica and fbbt-
loose 800-221-0596, www.trekamerica.com
email: info@trekamerica
WINTER ESCAPE- Cozy log cabini'n
lake. $54-79 ntly. Incl. hot tub, cross country
trails & more. Near downhill. Traverse City.
616/276-9502.
.musiQ
THE BEST REPAIR SHOP FOR YOU.
Endorsed by idols & most makers. Herb
David Guitar Studio. 302 E. Liberty. 95-
8001.
HEMP
Hats Bags Clothing Body
Just call for
Free catalog
(800)494-TBHC
INTERESTED IN A PUBLISHING
CAREER?
An editor/publishing recruiter will be in the
Michigan Union's Anderson Room A on
Wednesday, February 4, at 6 p.m., to discuss
opportunities at the University of Denver
Publishing Institute. This graduate-level
program offers four weeks of summer in-
struction-in beautiful Colorado!l-with 'top
professionals in the publishing industry. Stu-
dents get an inside look at: trade publishing,
children's books, scholarly and reference
publishing, textbooks, electronic publishjirg,
and literary agencies. Experienced profes-
sionals conduct workshops in the areas of
editorial (editing and proofreading), market-
ing (sales, publicity, and advertising), and
production (design and manufacturing). Field
trps to local publishers and bookshops
enhance the intensive-but fun-course' of
instruction. Career counseling is featured
during the program's final week. -
This recruiting event is scheduled through U-
M Career Planning and Placement office. For
more information, call Larry Baker at 800-
347-4253, ext. 1219, or email him. at
LBaker@gale.com
OFF STREET PRKG 316 N. State. 662-
'712~111

" ow

NOW HIRING
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

*Work for The Michigan Daily Classifieds
*Exciting, student-run environment
*Flexible hours around your classes
*Great resume and business experience
*Eain commission-based pay
*Have your work seen by 40,000 people
DAILY
Interested yet? For more information call
Adam or Monica at 764-0557 ASAP!
PART-TIME MARKETING research as-
sistant for media oriented firm. 12-25 hrs./
*k, $9/hr. Needs strong PC skills. Resume to
Mark Kassof & Co. 220 E. Huron Ste. 209.
Ann Arbor, 48104.

SERVICE REP NEEDED. Are you selfj
motivated & possess exc. communication!
skills? Do you have an enthusiastic per-
sonality/attitude? Exc. compensation
package. Up to 30 hrs./wk. avail. Call Mike,
at 662-5485.

WANTED: Subjects for psychology experi-
ment on perception at U of M. Takes 1 hr.
pays $10. Must be native English speaker &
20/20 correctable vision. Call 763-0115.

yr r r ...a

. _ _~_,_

k ,u't j http /ww personalumich edu/-.jstempie/cartoon html

Bahamas Party
Cuise $ 279
6 Days ' Most Meals * Free Parties' eincludes Taxes
Cancun $399
7 Nights Air/Hotel - Free Meals & 21 Hours Free Drinks
Jaaica 1419
7 Nights - Air + Hotel - Save $150 on Food & Drinks
Panama City$1 19
Spring Break Travel - Our 11th Year!
1-800-678-6386
springbreaktravel.com
LOOK GREAT FOR Spring llreak! Lose
weight fast!...up to 39 lbs. in 30 days! Safe,
natural, Money Back Guarantee. Call toll free
(888)-464-5419 _ _
FLORIDA
SPRING BREAK
From $129 p.p. Sandpiper
Beacon Beach Resort. 3
pools (1 indoor), hot tub,
tiki bar. Home of the
world's largest keg party.
Free info
1-800-488-8828
Fre Reer All Week

by John Stempien

anti
ito N;.Ups
E C
fjovv!

Rose Bowl
Toothpicks
Each pick embossed with Rose
Bowl Logo!
100 picks
$500
200 picks
$8.00

Rose Bowl
Tweenkies@
by Moen=
'-f,
Great keepsake! Guaranteed
to stay fresh a hifetimel
.._Qif ha n m mf-

Rose Bowl
Condoms
Everything will be literally
coming-up roses!
J
Family Pack of 24 for $19 98
_-oaaial oe cn-

I

I

I

I I

a

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan