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January 30, 1998 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1998-01-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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lews: 76-DAILY
dvertising: 764-0554

One hundred seven years of editorialfreedom

Friday
January 30, 1998

State

of the

state

is

'ouistanding'

By Peter Romer-Friedman
and Mike Spahn
ily Staff Reporters
LANSING - In the last State of the
State address of his second term, Gov.
John Engler applauded Michigan for its
prosperity and offered ambitious goals
for the future. Speaking in the state
capitol last night, Engler proudly
informed the legislature that "the state
of the state is outstanding."
Engler outlined several initiatives to
focus on in the coming year, including
cuts, education funding, environ-
ental improvements, expanded wel-
fare reforms and a harder line on the
state's criminals.
Shortly after Engler's introduction,
he put the state's economy on center
stage, lauding Michigan's 4.1-percent
unemployment rate and the $11 billion
in tax cuts enacted during his adminis-
tration.

"Strength captures Michigan's econ-
omy in the '90s - 24 tax cuts mean a
savings of more than $11 billion for our
citizens. Month after month, we report
record-low unemployment numbers.
Today, more high-paying jobs are being
created than at any time in our history.
"Because of our efforts over the last
seven years, Michigan is a far better
state in which to live, work, and raise a
family."
One issue omitted in Engler's speech
was the condition of the state's institu-
tions of higher education - although
he did note the recent success of the
Michigan football team, citing the
Wolverines' national championship as
an example of the state's accomplish-
ments and values.
"Now the whole world knows
Michigan is No. I," Engler shouted
over the crowd's applause. "It is fitting
that we applaud Michigan's great teams

"Now the whole world knows
Michigan is No. 1."
- Gov. John Engler

and athletes because they are the best in
their class. They climbed to the top
because of the important qualities they
possess - qualities like strength, com-
mitment, leadership and teamwork."
Rep. At Frank (D-Saginaw) said he
was disappointed that Engler didn't
state a stance on higher education, an
issue of great concern to many offi-
cials.
"He forgot to mention providing
more access to higher education to all
families," Frank said."
Engler devoted part of his speech to
other aspects of public education,

pointing at increases in K-12 spending.
He promised smaller classes by offer-
ing a $20-million spending initiative.
Engler boasted that his administration
has boosted public education funding
by 50 percent.
Simultaneously, Engler said, the state
has kept a balanced budget and cut
taxes.
"I am very proud to say that
Michigan is the only state in America to
balance its budget six years in a row, cut
taxes 24 times and increase education
spending every year," Engler said.
See STATE, Page 5

AP POTO
Gov. John Engler gives the State of the State address last night in Lansing at the
State Capitol.

-f

'U' to join black
history celebration

Preparing for the end

By Susan T. Port
Daily Staff Reporter
undreds of University students are
ected to participate in upcoming
activities celebrating Black History
Month, challenging the traditional view
of American history.
LaRonda Brown, the African
American coordinator in the Office of
Multiethnic Student Affairs, said the
kickoff, planned for this weekend, will
include panel discussions and jazz
demonstrations.
"In the past we have had a really
Wd turnout," Brown said.
Brown encourages not only students
of color to attend the events, but stu-
dents from all cultural and back-

grounds.
"This is a learning process," Brown
said. "It's to enhance the environment.
If the student takes the initiative to
step (in), then they will learn some-
thing."
Engineering junior Doria Hickman,
who is a member of the National
Society of Black Engineers, said she
regrets not having the opportunity to
learn about black history earlier.
"I didn't learn about black history in
high school," Hickman said. "I think it's
important for everybody to take part. It's
kind of of neat to explore other cultures."
Brown said learning how African
Americans contributed to society
See HISTORY, Page 2

By Meg Exley
Daily Staff Reporter
Dancing to calypso music from a steeldrum band and
munching cotton candy, seniors kicked off the University's
annual graduation celebration last night.
"Random Carnival Fun" in the Michigan Union was the
first event of many planned for Senior Days '98. In the
upcoming months, students can anticipate speakers, con-
certs, raffles and commencement activities, with most of
the events occurring in April, closer to graduation time.
"This time of year can be a little dull, so we wanted to
plan something exciting to kick off the semester," said
Laura Chelela, Senior Days '98 Publicity Coordinator.
The festivities caused many seniors to reminisce about
similar events held when they were first-year students.
"We came to a party like this one when we were fresh-
men, during 'Welcome Week," said LSA senior Patty
Juliao. "Now we're here for one as seniors. It's like 'good-
bye week' instead of 'Welcome Week.
The celebration featured "Trinidad Tripoli Steelband," a
band whose use of steel drums creates music that combines
calypso, reggae and soca. In addition, psychics and tarot
card readers entertained the crowd.
"I came specifically for the psychic," said LSA senior
Laura Pylat. "I'm about to go forth into a new world, so I'm
taking all the advice I can get to guide me once I leave U of
See SENIOR, Page 2

DAILY CROSSWORD PUZZLE
Edited by Trude Michel Jaffe

ACROSS
1 Doorway
sidepiece
5 Swiss ski resort
10 Soothing salve
14 Myanmar locale
15 Lucine of the
opera
"Manon" melody
"The Turn of the
Screw"
composer
20 - Hill, hcme of
T. Roosevelt
21 Playground
, insult
22 USNA grad
23 Rover's
warning
25 Basso Siepi
Soprano Berger
Campus VIPs
33 Winged
34 Dress shape
35 Former world
chess
champion
36 "Il Pirata"
composer
40 Real or social
ending
41 Two-door car
42 "Picnic"
* playwright
43 Salonga of
"Miss Saigon"
44 Fatigue
45 "The Go-
Between"
screenwriter
47 Orpheus's
instrument
48 Prohibit
49 Fold denizens
r Tex-Mex staple
"War and
Peace''
composer
60 Domesticate
61 Hart or Stephen
62 Run from
63 Luminary

3 Chinese
dynasty
4 - California,
Mexican
peninsula
5 Pop singer Vic
6 Islamic princes
7 Roof
adornment
8 Scepter's
partner
9 Patriotic org.
10 Hand-dyed
fabric
11 Companion of
crafts
12 Prevarications
13 Lots
18 USA citizen
19 Neighbor of
Egypt
23 Corruptive
inducement
24 William's aunt
25 Carp
26 "Fur -"
27 Seasonal visitor
28 Circumference
segment
29 Run off
romantically
30 Be frugal
31 Andes, for
example

32 Less ingenuous
34 Sky-blue
37 Reproduction in
relief
38 Opposite of
blanc
39 - Yutang
45 Garaged the
car
46 Divider's
preposition
47 Early cubist
painter
48 Kentucky
frontiersman

49 Dulles visitors:
Abbr.
50 Race
division
51 Humorist
Bombeck
52 Snare
53 Problematic
54 Actress
Kedrova
55 Onion's cousin
56 The birds
58 Berliner's
pronoun
59 For

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
R O S S C A G E S P A T A
A N T E A L L A H U S E R
P HIO N E B100T H S T L O
I E R S L U M S H RIE W
D RIE S S E D T U R B O
W E S G O S O U TH
H A S 1 N C O N E T UIE S
A P P T L I N E D T R A P
E R E S L 1111 F T Y
E B O A T P A T S I E S
A C T O N T U T U M#M E
C O R A M O U T H P I E C E
E V! R T A N T E S T E P
S E E DES T A Y S M A E S

JODI S. COHEN/Daily
University student Nasreen Syed gets her tarot cards read by University graduate student Sharmila
Basu last night at the Michigan Union as part of Seniors Days.

JOSH WHITE/Daily
Walt Griggs draws a caricature of LSA senior Monik Lala
last night during the Senior Days kickoff event.

.

Abortion
clinic bomb
kills guard
The Washington Post

1 12

7 8

11 1

II

I

2 t~lt

21
23 24
39

12 13 BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -A bomb so powerful it
shattered glass a block away exploded outside a
Birmingham abortion clinic yesterday, killing an
off-duty policeman moonlighting as a security
guard and seriously injuring a nurse on her way to
work.
Officials said it was the first fatal bombing of
31 32 an abortion clinic since violence at clinics began
to be recorded more than 15 years ago. The blast
occurred one week after the 25th anniversary of
the Roe vs. Wade Supreme Court decision that
cleared the way for legal abortions in the United
States.
President Clinton swiftly condemned the bomb-
ing, calling it "an unforgivable act that strikes at
the heart of the constitutional freedoms and indi-
- - 4.. i~l~ r. nil A ,.;, bIA Aena

CHOOSE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE!
All the President
(Bollmger's) Men
NN ARBOR - You are an editor at The Michigar
Daily. You don't sleep -- ever - or go to class, an(
when you get your paycheck at the end of the month
you have enough money to buy a Chicken McNugget. One
(Sauce not included.) But you are willing to put up with it all.
because every so often, your life gets exciting. Today is one ol
those times. The football team is beating some big power
house, and you're sure the only reason the team is winning i:.
because you picked against it in the paper. You watch the tele
vision news, which you don't respect, and decide that it's onli
presenting the bare bones of the story. You can do better. In.
newspaper, you have learned, you can cram in a lot more infor
mation to make sure the floor in Angell Hall is well informed
Anyway, the team wins, and you hear the president ofa larg(
university near here has invited students over to his big, white
house for a kegger. This is BIG! Everyone will be there! So
you run that way quickly to make sure you get there before the
beer is gone.
"The Daily is the best newspaper in the world," you hear the
president say, as you squeeze by him and tussle his perfectl,
combed hair (you've always wanted to do that). As you mak(
your way to the keg, you find there are too many administra-

33
3&
40
43

37 38
41
44
47

ii

42

' AP PHOTO
University of Alabama student Claudia Morales
stands outside her dorm after yesterday's bombing.
Randy Tate, executive director of the anti-abor-
tion Christian Coalition, joined in the condemna-
tion, calling it a "reprehensible act of violence."
No one claimed responsibility for the attack,
which occurred at 7:33 a.m., before the clinic had
onend and no warning was iven. according to

======

i -1 ®

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