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January 23, 1998 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1998-01-23

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 23, 1998 - 9

Ahnen shares 'Act' at Shaman Drum

Denzel Washington and John Goodman try to beat the devil In "Fallen," directed by Gregory Hobilt ("Prim
Script raises Fallen from f

AHNN
Continued from Page 5
Ahnen s style is extremely graceful
x and fluid; one can complete this whole
collection in one sitting. Though her
characters and stories are so life-like,
she has the perfect balance of tension
and laughter, heartbreak and humor,
to make this collection truly entertain-
ing.
"Balancing Act," the title story, is
particularly thought-provoking.
Ahnen thoroughly develops the char-
acter Eleni and shows her transforma-
tion into womanhood and how she
deals with a perverse man
who wishes to take
tal Fear"). advantage of her
growing beauty.
SThis man, .
i u re who stares at
her from the
corners of his r
eyes, is not at
movie is not as reli- man she can
e only real religious easily escape. He
(specifically, but not helped her immi-
as two sides, a good grant father get a job,
ne must also believe and, out of respect, she must
y on the latter, call him uncle.
he screen as perhaps Eleni, a bright and witty girl, is able
iated acting talent. to see right through him and therefore
the showing, "He's protect herself from an uncomfortable
her Hitchcockesque situation. Eleni teaches a great lesson
an extraordinary sit- on the strength hidden deep within
every child.
he perfect actor to por- Throughout the novel, Ahnen uses
good that Hobbes rep- plausible stories such as this to get
n, while in Reese, tries inside her readers' hearts and minds to
but there is too much teach valuable lessons.
Before writing fiction, Ahnen was
nust find other ways to an award-winning journalist and a
es for destroying its playwright.
This experience proved to be an
Stanton (Donald extremely useful source from which
in schlockv B-horror Ahnen was able to draw to produce

her masterpieces. When asked where
these characters come from, Ahnen
points to her head and replies, "They
are all in here."
As wonderful a writer as Ahnen is at
short stories, she far surpasses her
own abilities when it comes to writing
poetry.
Her poems have the power to dive
into the inner depths of the reader, and
draw from the source of emotion that
enable the reader to truly feel Ahnen's
poetry.
Although her poems reflect her own
personal experiences, the feelings
expressed are again universal.
At Shaman Drum on
Tuesday evening,
Ahnen read from
her new collec-
tion.
For Ahnen,
........::a reading is an
opportunity to
let all of those
characters who
only exist in her
head, and now in
her book, come alive.
When asked which story is
her favorite, she explained that just as
mother has no favorite child, she does
not have a favorite story. "They are all
my babies," she said with a smile.
Her reading spurred many ques-
tions and great interest from the lis-
teners.
The audience received her well, and
not only enjoyed themselves, but
learned a great deal in the process.
Throughout the interview, Ahnen
spoke with intensity and passion
about her writing. Ahnen was quick to
offer some valuable pieces of advice
for aspiring writers.
"Just do it, and do not stop.
Practice writing and let your mind run

free"
Ahnen has the power to make one
believe that it is possible to ac e
anything, a power that is transjp d
into her writing.
Ahnen's stories and poetry ar
extremely forceful and they cogel
the reader to be overcome with eo-
tions ranging from all shades o
spectrum.
In reading her stories and pQ y
the reader, like Eleni, becomes 4a-
ancing act of emotions.
- Corinne Schn tr

By Geordy Gantsoudes
Daily Arts Writer
About 30 minutes into "Fallen," Detectives Hobbes
(Denzel Washington) and Jonesy (the ever-svelte John
Goodman) begin contemplating the meaning of life. Hobbes
is'bothered by his sudden awareness that his opponent is no
mortal being and he asks Jonesy, "What is the meaning of
thi?"
It was at this point when I began asking myself the same
question, but in regards to the movie, not to life. The movie
was going nowhere at light speed. Then, all of the sudden, as
if by divine intervention, the movie became good, and I mean
really good.
The topic of "Fallen" is not new; it
is quite prevalent in the Bible, but
Sunday school was never quite like
this. (Heck, if it were, I would have
gone more often.) The film begins j
with the devil and his conspiring
angels being thrown out of heaven and At Br
unleashed upon the Earth. Hobbes's
nemesis is not the devil, but one of his
minions.
This story succeeds where others of its ilk, most notably
"The Prophecy," have failed. A good idea was not enough to
save that Christopher Walken flop. It lacked a solid script,
which is what allows "Fallen" to take off.
The movie begins with Hobbes attending the execution of
the notorious serial killer Reese (a wonderfully creepy Elias
Koteas), the arrest of whom electrified Hobbes' career. Reese
is a carrier of the aforementioned demon.
As the villian dies, singing the Rolling Stones classic
"Time Is on My Side" - the perfect song for the movie --
the demon is passed on to a prison guard. And from there, it
is passed on to whoever it wants by the means of a touch.
One touch by the possessed leaves you at the mercy of the

iar

demon.
But there is no need to worry; the
gion-intensive as it may seem. The
theme in the movie is that religion(
solely Judeo-Christian religions) ha
and an evil. To believe in heaven, o
in hell. "Fallen" concentrates mostly
As the hero, Washington rules th
this country's most under-apprec
Plus, as one female remarked after
so fine." He is excellent in the rat
role of an ordinary man placed ina
uation.
Washington is th
tray the symbol of
E V I E W resents. The demon
to inhabit Hobbes,
Fallen good in him.
*** So, the demon m
wood and Showcase get back at Hobb
favorite host.
Lieutenant
Sutherland) is no longer slumming iti
movies, and he is surprisingly gooda
viewer is not quite sure what to think
is as mysterious as his Mr. X in "JF
and demeanor are the perfect cou
Hobbes.
Gretta Milano (Embeth Davidtz),h
screen time, is almost forgettable in
"Schindler's List," in which she played
it is obvious that she has the capability
"Fallen" is purely fantastic. If you ca
minutes - and believe me, it is not t
the thriller will keep you on the edge
finish.

as Hobbes' boss. The
k of his character; he
K." His harsh facade
nterpart to Denzel's
because of a lack of
"Fallen." But, as in
3 Ralph Fiennes maid,
to steal a scene.
an get past the first 30
hat easy-- the rest of
of your seat until the

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