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January 21, 1998 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1998-01-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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MEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
(1) Duke 101,
N. CA ROLINA A&T 66
(18) XAVIER 72,
St Joseph's 62
(21 West VirgnaS,
RUTGERS 72
(23) CLEMSON 69,
Virgin a 52

(25) Cincinnati 60,
TULANE 50
WOMEN'S
BASKETBALL
(1) Tennessee 125,
DePAUL 46
IOWA STATE 82,
(5) Texas Tech 73
Iowa 66,
(15) WISCONSIN 63

PRO
HOCKEY
NEW JERSEY 3,
Detroit 1
NY RANGERS 3.
St. Louis 1
Ottawa 0.
PITTSBURGH 0, (OT)
PHILADELPHIA 3,
Buf ala 0

CHICAGO.
NY Islanders 2
PRO
BASKETBALL
ATLANTA 113.
Mlwaukee 90
Por tland 86.
CLEVELAND 84
DALLAS 107,
Seattle 98

Wednesday
January 21, 1998

9

m

so

II

5

some

Webber
1arrested for
marijuana
possession
SEAT PLEASANT, Md. (AP) - In
too much of a hurry to get to practice, for-
*mer Michigan star Chris Webber ended
up with a face full of pepper spray, six
hours in jail and a marijuana charge.
After a routine traffic stop for speed-
ing, the Washington Wizards forward was
arrested yesterday and charged with
assault, resisting arrest, -possession of
marijuana, driving under the influence of
marijuana and five other traffic-related
violations.
All the charges are misdemeanors, and
Webber, a member of Michigan's Fab
Five recruiting class, will probably be
tried before a District Court judge some-
time this spring. Webber was released on
his own recognizance.
"We look forward to having the matter
tried," said Webber's lawyer, - Bruce
Marcus. Webber avoided reporters by sit-
ting in the back seat of his black, dark-
windowed Lincoln Navigator as it depart-
ed from a rear exit of the Prince George's
County District Ill police station.
See WEBBER, Page 10

It was ugly, but
Michigan takes

Big Ten
By Dan Stillman
Daily Sports Writer
What a difference a year makes. Last
season, the Wolverines, on their home
court, watched Minnesota cut down the
nets in celebration of its first Big Ten
championship in 15 years. This season,
the Golden Gophers could barely even
find the nets.
Minnesota shot a dismal 29.4 percent
last night as
Z Michigan 65 No. 16
Michigan
K Minnesota 57 won, 65-57,

ulead

notching its
eighth victory in nine games and taking
sole possession of first place in the con-
ference - at least for now.
The Wolverines (15-4) sit on top of
the Big Ten with a 5-1 conference
record. Both lowa and Michigan State,
who play each other tonight, are tied for
second in the conference at 4-1.
First place "feels good, but it's not a
surprise," Michigan forward Baston
said. "Now, we're going into the hard
part of the conference schedule."
The Wolverines play Illinois (3-2),
No. 12 Purdue (3-2) and No. 10 Iowa
(4-1) in their next three games, going
on the road to face the Illini and
Hawkeyes.
The defeat dropped the Gophers, a
Final Four team last season, to 0-6 in
the conference and 7-10 overall.
After the Wolverines dominated the
first half, thanks mostly to a horrible
shooting performance by Minnesota, a
reversal of fortune helped the Gophers
make things interesting in the second.
Minnesota shot .441 in the second
half, .500 from 3-point land, compared
to a dismal .147 shooting performance
from the floor in the first stanza. Even
though Michigan improved its overall
shooting percentage from the first to
second halves (.321 to .375), the
Wolverines followed a 4-of-7 perfor-
mance from 3-point land in the first half
by missing all 11l of their attempts from
beyond the arc after the break.
The Wolverines, who started the sec-
ond half with a 26-15 advantage, led by
as many as 15 points with 7:57 remain-
ing in the game. But Minnesota guard
Sam Jacobson cut the Michigan lead to
60-55 with 40 seconds left in the game

when he made his third 3-pointer in less
than six minutes.
But the Gophers had dug themselves
too deep a hole, as the Wolverines made
5-of-6 free throws in the final 40 sec-
onds of the game. The Wolverines con-
verted on 21-of-31 (.641) attempts from
the charity stripe overall.
Michigan's Robert Traylor finished
with 21 points and 12 rebounds, while
Baston also helped the Wolverines with
14 boards.
The game got off to an ugly start,
with neither team scoring until Louis
Bullock nailed a 3-pointer to put the
Wolverines ahead 3:41 into the game.
Meanwhile, the Gophers committed
three fouls even before getting on the
board. Minnesota finally scored when
freshman Kyle Sanden hit a bank shot
with 13:43 remaining in the first half to
cut the Michigan lead to three points.
But Minnesota baskets were few and far
between in the first half.
The Wolverines .321 shooting perfor-
mance in the first half, well under their
.496 average, was more than enough tO
overpower the Gophers who made just
5-of-34 (.147) shots in the first half.
"It was an ugly game tonight,"
Minnesota coach Clem Haskins said.
"Nothing pretty about this game. I wsant
to thank God that it's over."
Michigan's defense held Jacobsoi,
an All-America candidate, to one baskct
on 1-of-7 shooting in the first half, The
senior guard, who played in his second
game back after missing three games
due to injury, came storming back in the
second half to finish with 21 points.
As if the Gophers weren't embarrass-
ing themselves on offense in the first
half, Michigan defenders managed to
humiliate the Gophers even more.
Midway through the half, the
Wolverines stuffed the Gophers tice
on one possession. First, Traylor rejcct-
ed a shot by a driving Kevin Clark, fol-
lowed by Josh Asselin's swatting away
of another Gopher shot attempt, high-
lighting a run that put the Wolverines
up, 17-4, with 7:45 left in the first half.
Minnesota scored the next five points
to pull to within 17-9, but 3-pointers
from Travis Conlan and Robbie Reid
gave the Wolverines a 15-pointer lead
with 1:51 left in the half.

NICHOLAS J. COTSONIKA/Daily WARREN ZINN/Daisy
* (Left) LSA junior Evan Schiffman shows his support for former Fab Fiver Chris Webber, who was arrested yesterday on marijuana charges. (Right) LSA senior Maceo Baston
muscles in for two of his 13 points as Kinesiology junior Robert Traylor looks on. Baston finished with 14 rebounds and Traylor collected 12 boards to go with 21 points.
Last yr I a ln time ago for Go hes Hasks

6y James Goldstein
Daily Sports Writer
Last February, Minnesota basketball
r coach Clem Haskins walked into the
0 Crisler Arena press room following the
Gophers' 55-54 victory over Michigan,
donning a basketball net around his neck
aiida wide grin on his face.
Who could blame him? The No. 2
team in the nation had just captured the
Gophers' first Big Ten title since 1982
and beaten the Wolverines at Crisler
Arena for the second time in 28 tries.
After the buzzer sounded, Minnesota
players rightfully celebrated their confer-
ence title. But it's how the Gophers cele-
brated that lingered in the minds of the
Wolverines.
Minnesota players were hooting and

hollering on center court and they didn't
stop there. Players remained on the floor
as the Wolverines headed to their locker-

S
twine for a souvenir.
down went the nets.

room and the
Crisler fans left
for the exits.
And then
came the scis-
sors.
Haskins said
he asked the
Minnesota ath-
letic director if it
was okay to cut
the Crisler
He approved and

year's victory. "I try to show class in
defeat and I try to show class the same
way we win."
For a coach who is known to show all
class, the move was kind of surprising.
Was it the most unappropriate gesture
that a team could give? No, not at all. The
Gophers, who advanced to the Final Four,
had a special team last year and Haskins
- the 1997 National Coach of the Year,
- had the right to celebrate.
This was not bulletin-board material,

but that's not to say the Wolverines let it
completely slip their minds.
Jesse Mae Carter, Robert Traylor's
grandmother, best summed up the
Michigan players' feelings of the
Minnesota trim-job, heading into last
night's game.
"Minnesota is not going to cut any nets
tonight;' she said.
The Gophers didn't cut the nets, they
didn't grace the nets, they didn't get any-
See HASKINS, Page 10

"I think there's a right way and a wrong
way to do things," said Haskins after last

v.

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