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November 18, 1997 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1997-11-18

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LoCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, November 18, 1997 - 7,

Con tnetd from Page i
refiting guidelines for affirmative
acii6n policies. Many institutions have
looked to this case in forming their
admiiissions policies, he said.
SNRE Prof. Bunyan Bryant said he
believes that affirmative action is an
important policy for the University to
uphold.
"Affirmnative action is a plan to have
COY area of the University to reflect the
diversity of the world," Bryant said. "We

need affirmative action to deconstruct
race, to deconstruct institutional racism,
to enrich the University in both the class-
room and extracurricular activities."
RC Prof. Carl Cohen, a long-time
opponent of affirmative action, said
that despite "honorable motives" of
affirmative action, it is constitutionally
impermissible to include "preference
by race" in admissions standards.
"If the purpose of affirmative action
is to balance the races, that is constitu-
tionally wrong," Cohen said. "The
University does not have the authority

to compensate the wrongs of society. It
is our legal and moral duty to cleanse
ourselves of racial discrimination."
Steve Waterbrook, an officer of the
campus chapter of the College
Republicans, said the symposium was
necessary to inform students about both
sides of the debate.
"I myself came to support the anti-
affirmative action stance," said
Waterbrook, an LSA sophomore. "But
tonight's panel hopefully showed that it
is important to hear both sides, because
education is really the key."

MSA
Continued from Page 1
Nonetheless, posters, fliers and sidewalk chalkings are com-
mon campaign methods at most universities.
"Most everybody chalks, along with fliering and poster-
ing," Murty said. "Some of the candidates will stand outside
and pass out fliers:'
@isconsin's student government holds two elections each
year for the 33 available seats, Murty said. Two seats are
reserved for incoming first-year students, while the remain-
ing seats are filled during a spring election.
"Some seats are very hotly contested, and in some schools,
people will win on write-in votes," Murty said, adding that
eight-to-10 percent of students turned out to vote in the last
spring election.
The voter turnout at the University for MSA elections last
spring was 15 percent. Spring elections, however, usually
attract more student voters due to the presidential race.
*eople don't care or don't take student government seri-
ously enough,' Murty said.
Ii addition to personally funded campaigns, the Wisconsin
student government distributes an informational flier contain-
ing the name, picture and brief statement from each candidate.
A University of Pennsylvania student government committee
sponsors an advertisement for candidates in the student newspa-
per giving each candidate room for a 150-word statement, said
Joshua Cohen, first-year undergraduate assembly representative
for Penr student government. The tradition caused some contro-
versy this year, prompting new elections.
;xvo statements were left out of the paper," Cohen said.

The elections were ruled biased and then re-run. Voter turn-
out for the second election dropped from 30 to 20 percent,
Cohen added.
Until this year, the Penn student government barred candi-
dates from speaking with the student paper to avoid unfair
publicity, Cohen said.
"No one really had a platform - if you got your name out
there, it counted," Cohen said.
While the Wisconsin student government operates on a
multi-party system, most parties don't last from one election
to the next, Murty said. They are mainly used to "link names
together," he said.
About two-thirds of the elected candidates are run with par-
ties, Murty said.
Unlike MSA elections, OSU students can vote for two rep-
resentatives in their annual student government elections; one
vote is based on their school and a second vote is based on
the area in which students live, such as residence halls, off-
campus housing or co-operative housing, Daniels said.
The student government at the University of Alabama
recently returned to its campus after a four-year hiatus, said
Wade Smith, executive secretary of the student government
association for Alabama.
"There was a young lady who was running for president
and she was assaulted (because she was a candidate)," said
Smith, adding that the administration then disbanded the stu-
dent government.
Smith said the last election produced slightly less than a
26-percent turnout of students, falling just short of the elec-
tion that brought student government back to the Alabama
campus.

Event
focuses
on future
of media
By Ken Mazur
Daily Staff Reporter
An all-day conference on the future
of media institutions and its relation-
ship to democracy brought scholars
from around the country to the
University campus on Saturday.
The conference, titled "Media &
Democracy 2000," gave scholars an
opportunity to air concerns, debate
alternatives and offer solutions to the
questions that exist in the field of media
and communications.
"This conference is a good way for us
to identify directions that make sense
for Michigan to explore, in light of
what other universities are doing," said
Vincent Price, chair of the communica-
tion studies department. "This is really
an agenda-setting meeting for us, a way
to find out what to do, and what to do
different."
Saturday's conference was sponsored
both by the Department of
Communication Studies and the
Howard R. Marsh Center for
Journalistic Performance.
The current trend of media industry
mergers and the resulting concentration
of power in fewer hands was a cause for
concern to some of the visiting schol-
ars.
"Where is the serious academic
research of telecommunications major
mergers?" asked American University
communications Prof. Patricia
Aufderheide. "How many minority
owners are there of radio and television
stations?"
Topics brought up at the conference
included the different agendas of the
various actors in the media and com-
munications field, and the uneasy sym-
biosis between communication acade-
mia, industry and the public.
Jane Brown, a professor of journal-

MALLORY Si. FLOYD/ftly
Panelist Henry Jenkins and Communication Studies Chair Vincent Price speak at.
the Media and Democracy 2000 Conference on Saturday.

ism and mass communication at the
University of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill, spoke of the relationship between
academic research and industry grants
and possible conflicts of interests.
"We have to be very careful about
preserving our intellectual integrity,"
Brown said.
Reaction to the discussion was posi-
tive, with audience members saying
they found the conference informative
and thought provoking.
"I've wondered about the interface of
academia and the industry," said Jayne
Hamilton, a writer from Bloomfield
Hills. "It's disconcerting to hear that
we're not that close to a solution on some
of these problems, and it's horrible news
that students are getting these great edu-
cations, and then they go into the work
arena and have to conform to the current
state of the media journalism."
University of Texas at Austin College
of Communication Dean Ellen Wartella
also spoke about the new direction that
academics in communications are
heading toward.
"Universities today are being held
accountable in ways that they have
never been held accountable before"
Wartella said.

Other communication acadenwes
voiced concerns with emerging meta
technology and its consequences foi
democracy. Nolan Bowie, a communi
cations professor at Temple Universiy,
said he wants more public discoursem
communications policy. He noted I
lack of commentary in the mainstrea,
media on the debate and subsequent
passage of the I 9
Telecommunications Bill.
"This bill was debated in academic
journals, instead of in the public
Bowie said. "We need to concentrateq.n,
technology, and what technology ca
and should do."
Brown said she remembered bein a
professional intern at The Detroit News.
in 1980 and how it made her realize tbai
being a professor was much more to her'
liking.
"It's hard work being a journalist;
Brown said. "I'd rather teach it than o
it."
Some of the University's commuli-
cations scholars said they found The
conference to be highly informational.
"It's really interesting to see wba&
other professionals from around the
country are thinking about and what
questions are being raised," Price said.

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JUST AS VINNIE "MEMORY LAPSE' BEGAN TO SEE THE IRONY OF THE
SITUATION. HE STARTED. TO THINK ABOUT TONIGHTS DATE WITH
THE VERY LOVELY MARIA COTTACHONI.

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