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November 13, 1997 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

8A - The Michigan Daily -Thursday, November 13, 1997

BARAKA
Continued from Page 1A
may (make $60 million), but we
need to watch out for you because
you're probably the enemy."
Later in his speech, Baraka yelled to
the audience while discussing the place
of poor people in society.
"It is not right that your child can
get an education and mine can't; that
you can eat and I can't," Baraka
said.
Audience members responded
enthusiastically to Baraka's speech.
"He's been an inspiration to me. This
has been a very powerful experience,'
said Tamera, an LSA junior who did not
want her last name used.
Baraka advised black and work-
ing-class students to not waste their
time while in college by concentrat-
ing on University-imposed sub-
jects.
He told them not to worry about
being the first African American to
succeed in traditionally white-domi-
nated areas, but to go back to their
communities and figure out how to
improge conditions.
Throughout the entire speech,
Baraka promoted the idea of a revo-
lution He paralleled the difference
between the United States' two-party

system to Europe's multiparty sys-
tem, and said that Bob Dole and
President Clinton are virtually inter-
changeable in a "winner take all"
system.
"I am a communist and a socialist.
I believe that everything belongs to
everybody," Baraka said. He added
that he believed in self-determina-
tion and democracy and stressed that
students should learn all they can
from revolutionaries around the
world.
"You can't make change until you
practice change," he said.
LSA sophomore LaDawna Reynolds
said she went to listen to Baraka speak
because she was curious about his mes-
sage.
"I'm here because I think it's going to
be a very interesting experience, and
I'm interested in what he's going to
say," Reynolds said.
Throughout the speech, Baraka pro-
moted non-traditional reading. He told
students to read great authors such as
DuBois, Herman Melville and
Frederick Douglass.
He also encouraged students to read
the slave narratives, works from the
Harlem Renaissance and revolutionary
writings from the '50s and '60s, saying
these works compared well to
Shakespeare's.

NATION/WORLD
Four Americans,
Pakistani shot to
death in Karachi

Fundraising
Publicity
leadership development
Are these things your student organization is trying to accomplish?
Get advice and help from the office of Student Activities & Leader-
ship. We offer walk-in advising during these convenient hours:
Walk-in Hours
Monday: 1-4 pm
Tuesday: 4-8 pm
Wed:9gam - 12pm
Thursday: 1-4 pm
Friday: 1-4 pm
Rm 2209 Michigan Union Division of Student Affairs
Make the most of your student organization and come see usl
Questions? Call 763-5900 or email us at salead@umich.edu.

KARACHI, Pakistan (AP) - The
black car carrying four American oil
company employees to work inched
along a bridge jammed with school
buses yesterday. A red car weaved in
and out of traffic, then pulled up
behind.
Shots rang out. Then two gunmen in
khaki jackets and traditional baggy
Pakistani garments leapt out, strode
over to the black car and emptied the
clips of their Kalashnikov rifles inside.
After checking to see if all four
Americans and their Pakistani driver
were dead, the gunmen fled.
There was no claim of responsibility
for the attack, but it followed the U.S.
conviction Monday of a Pakistani, Mir
Aimal Kasi, in the shootings of two
CIA employees outside agency head-
quarters in Langley, Va. U.S. officials
had been warned of possible retaliation.
"It is premature to say why they were
killed, but there is a strong possibility
that it was linked to Kasi's conviction
and sentencing," Karachi Police Chief
Malik Iqbal said yesterday. "We know it
was a target killing. It wasn't random
firing."
In Washington, President Clinton's
spokesperson called the killings "an
outrageous act of barbarism." However,
White House press secretary Mike
McCurry stressed there was no direct
evidence of a connection with the CIA
case.
Pakistan President Farooq Leghari
wrote Clinton to express his shock at
what he called a "terrorist" attack on
"four innocent U.S. nationals." The let-
ter was delivered to the U.S. ambas-
sador in Islamabad.
The four Americans, all auditors for
Houston-based Union Texas Petroleum,
were traveling from their hotel to their
office when they were intercepted by
the gunmen.
The gunmen later abandoned their
vehicle near Karachi's central post
office and disappeared, the police chief

said.
The slain Americans were identified
by Texas Petroleum as: Ephraim Egbu,
senior auditor; Joel Enlow, manager of
audit projects; Larry Jennings, audit
manager; and Tracy Ritchie, senior
audit supervisor.
The bodies of the men, all in their
40s, were to be flown home to Houston
today.
"Our heartfelt sympathies go out to
their families and their friends here at
Union Texas," said company chairper-
son John Whitmire.
McCurry said the killings would not
affect plans for Clinton and Secretary
of State Madeleine Albright to visit
Pakistan. Clinton's trip is scheduled for
early 1998; Albright is to arrive Sunday.
Hours after the shooting, a crowd
surrounded the black car, looking at the
blood spread on the seats and shattered
glass in the windshield frames. A
bloody newspaper lay on the road near-
by.
Iqbal said police have put together a
description of the attackers and have
begun a manhunt. The Pakistani
Cabinet met in an emergency session
and named a special investigative panel.
Kasi was convicted of first-degree
murder by a Fairfax, Va., court for the
Jan. 25, 1993, slayings of CIA employ-
ees Frank Darling and Lansing Bennett.
The two were shot in their cars at a traf-
fic light outside CIA headquarters.
Kasi's capture in Pakistan in June in a
joint FBI-Pakistani security force oper-
ation incensed many Pakistanis, who
objected to him being whisked out of
the country without an extradition hear-
ing. Tribesmen from his hometown of
Quetta had sworn to avenge the capture.
U.S. prosecutors had argued that Kasi
acted to avenge American meddling in
Muslim countries, including the bomb-
ing of Iraq during the Persian Gulf War.
However, Kasi was described as a loner
and there was no evidence he belonged
to any organized terror group.

A newspaper vendor sells late editions of local papers carrying the news of the
killing of four Americans and a Pakastani driver yesterday morning.

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BYLAWS'
Continued from Page IA
D'Alecy said SACUA is discussing the
possible addition of an orderly proce-
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"We're hoping that something like
that might be brought to the attention of
the group revising (the bylaws),"
D'Alecy said.

In accordance with the official
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the suggested changes will go
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