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November 13, 1997 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LOCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily -Thursday, November 13, 1997 - 5A

Oflunting season
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FRATERNITY
Continued from Page I.A
25.
Dewar said that pledges will be given
a card that states their rights and
responsibilities while in a TEc chapter,
along with a toll-free number that they
can call if they witness any divergence
from these policies.
IFC adviser John Mountz said
that even though hazing complaints
can be pursued anonymously, some-
times it's not possible. He said that
while fraternities may not be forc-
ing their pledges to do anything, the
pledges might still feel peer pres-
sure.
"It's pretty clear that the fact that
you make something an option does
not mean it's not hazing," Mountz

said. "One of the biggest challenges
in educating members is that the
peer pressure, or perceived peer
pressure, is what allows hazing to
occur."
He added that the major problem
with hazing is that it often goes unre-
ported.
While the IFC forbids hazing,
Mountz acknowledges that the criteria
for hazing can be confusing because it
ranges broadly from forcing alcohol
consumption to having pledges wear
pledge pins.
One University student and for-
mer fraternity member, who wished
to remain anonymous, said his fra-
ternity was kicked off campus par-
tially due to a hazing incident. lie
said the hazing incidents weren't
harmful, but more about frustrating

the pegs
was, neCvCr physiclly brtal dor l- co-
h1ol hing.1IL hult it "was MOre _merutal
and eniotionul. with guys yelling at
you and makingz you do useless
things - stutT like pushing a rock
Up a hill only to have it fall back
down."
But IFC President Ken Tanner said
hazing has not been a serious problem
at the University.
"I think a lot of our chapters have
done a good job of handling those
issues internally." Tanner said.
Traub said if incidents do occur, they
are rarely reported.
A majority of the time, it's not
reported because you don't want to
get the fraternity in trouble," Traub
said.

_.._...

EMILY NATHAN/Daily
urt Bell checks out rifles at the Mill Creek Sporting Goods Store in Dexter yesterday in preparation for Saturday's
eginning of deer season.
Auto technology equals profits

DETROIT (AP) - Electric cars,
ethanol cars, fuel cell cars - hardly a
month passes without some automaker
touting a technological breakthrough.
: ut even in this inflated age of auto-
iiive invention, Toyota Motor Corp.
managed to create waves with a plan to
sell a gasoline-electric hybrid car in
Japan that gets twice the mileage of a
regular car.
American automakers watched with
interest. Now they have a collective
retort: We can do that too.
But the Big Three says their break-
throughs will stay in the laboratory
i they can be shown to make a prof-
"We're really interested in what is
economically sound," said Ford
Chairperson Alex Trotman, "and
what is honest development
progress, before we put stuff out
there and make a big song and dance
FEELING THE
CHILL OF
OLD MAN
WINTER?
STOP BY THE
DAILY AT
420
MAYNARD
SrT
WE HAVE
CENTRAL
HEATING.

about it."
While much is still secret, some
results of the Big Three technology
race are trickling into the market.
General Motors Corp. since last
December has sold about 575 elec-
tric cars and pickups, while Ford
Motor Co. and Chrysler Corp. will
do small-scale launches of electric
minivans next year.
Ford said it will develop 250,000
vehicles starting in 1999 that can run on
either ethanol or gasoline, while
Chrysler has said it will develop
180,000 such minivans next model
year.
But it doesn't stop there. Automakers
are also researching the possible use of
gas turbines, compressed natural gas
and the spacecraft technology of hydro-
gen fuel cells.
"The level of effort is substantial,"-
said David Cole, director of the

University of Michigan's Office for the
Study of Automotive Transportation.
The multi-billion dollar research
effort happens within each of the Big
Three, but also jointly through a four-
year-old program with the federal gov-
ernment called the Partnership for a
New Generation of Vehicles.
The effort is driven by the need for
low-emission vehicles, as called for in
state and federal laws, analyst say.
Automakers also want to be prepared
for any future fuel oil crunch and for a
potential demand from Generation Xers
for "clean"vehicles. %
Being first with a new technology
also means bragging rights, said Wes
Brown, an analyst with Nextrend. "You
hate to have to play catch up or be far
behind," he said.
But analysts say it could be a decade
before alternative-fuel vehicles are
widespread in the United States.

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INSTRUCTION IS IN ENGLISH.
THE STUDENTS ARE
INTERNATIONAL.
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Bachelor of Science: Applied
Econotrics, Computer Science
Contact:
U.S. ffice
60 Bast 42nd Street, Suite 1463,
New York,NY 10017
Accredited by the Middle States
Regional Association.

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www.newharbinger.com

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