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November 11, 1997 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1997-11-11

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10 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, November 11, 1997

Shoulder injunes slow
netters at Regionals

By Mark Francescutti
Daily Sports Writer
One week ago, the Michigan men's
tennis team came back to Ann Arbor as
the best team in the Midwest, a shock to
the six others that were ranked ahead of
the Wolverines.
This week they came home bruised
and battered after Michigan ran out of
gas at the final fall tournament - the
Minnesota lee Volleys.
Michigan, whose players gave their
best performances at last weekend's
Rolex regionals, seemed to be tired and
emotionally drained at Minnesota.
"Having this event after the emotion-
al Rolex regionals, it was difficult both
emotionally and psychologically for the
guys to compete at their best," coach
Brain Eisner said.
"We played too much this fall. In the
future, I would not schedule anything
after the Rolex regionals."
Injuries plagued the Wolverines
throughout the weekend. It was as if
someone was performing voodoo and
stuck a needle in the shoulder of a doll,
because all of Michigan's problems
were in that area.
Sophomore Matt Wright was
knocked out with severe pain in his
bicep and was unable to continue.
"During my practice serves I felt a
pop in my shoulder," Wright said. "It's
something that I didn't want to get
worse."
Senior Dave Paradzik also fell due to
his rotator cuff. After falling short in his
first match to Minnesota, he was only
able to finish his second match before
calling it quits. Senior Brook Blain also
caught the injury bug with his shoulder
preventing him from feeling 100 per-
cent.
RUSSIANS
Continued from Page 9
It was the type of performance Ellerbe
said should become routine from the
senior forward.
"It would be nice to see those numbers
a lot more often," he said.
After starting slowly, Michigan iced
the game with about five minutes
remaining. Bullock and Jerod Ward
drained 3-pointers from opposite corners
and Baston flushed a dunk building the
lead to a 14 points, from which Michigan
coasted to the 25-point final margin.
In Travis Conlan's absence -- the
Michigan co-captain is sidelined with a
fractured wrist - Robbie Reid saw most
of the ball-handling duties for the
Wolverines. Without Conlan on the floor
and with Reid on the bench, Brandon
Smith assumed the shooting guard
duties.
Elllerbe presented his freshmen with
increased minutes.

"You could ask anyone on the team
and everyone would say that they have
some sort of nagging injury," Wright
added.
Besides the injuries, the Wolverines
fared just as well, compared to the other
teams, winning just more than half of
their matches.
The Wolverines fared especially well
against the Bulgaria Davis Cup squad,
winning three matches. But the addi-
tion of the Bulgarians as a fourth team
made it just more work for the battered
Wolverines.
"By adding the Bulgarians, who are
very good, we had more problems,"
Eisner said. "We played well," Eisner
said. "We just didn't have enough left
because we had given it all the week
be fore.'
Tiring is common in tennis because it
is a sport where the players constantly
play for days at a time. In the past two
weekends, the Wolverines played all
day for seven days.
"I think we still played well; I wasn't
worried," Eisner concluded.
As for the future, the coaches are to
turn in all of Michigan's stats and their
personal comments by tomorrow.
Then on Monday, an ITA committee
will make a decision based on those
stats, regional performance and pre-
season rankings as to which midwest-
ern team will represent Region IV in
the National Indoor Championships,
Feb. 22.
The Wolverines will have a 1 1'2
month break before beginning the dual
meet season in February. Practice is
not allowed by the NCAA, so
Michigan players will be practicing on
their own to rest and prepare for the
"real" season.
"They played a little bit better," Ellerbe
said. "The first time they went out, they
didn't know what to expect. This time
they were a little more comfortable"
With 7:30 left in the first half, Josh
Asselin played to his size.- an attribute
rarely seen in Michigan freshmen. On the
defensive end, he rejected a shot and laid
in the first two points of his Michigan
career at the other end.
Smith provided much of the night's
visual highlights, though, closing the
game with a furious rally on both ends of
the court. In the last two minutes,
glimpses of his athletic ability were dis-
played for the surprisingly-large Crisler
Arena crowd.
While he finished with 10 points, two
shots stood out in particular. His Jordan-
esque up-and-under move near the end of
the game displayed the hang time the 6-6
freshman possesses. At the other end, he
was called for a foul while defending a 3-
pointer - presumably for jumping too
high.

Golfers falter,
infial fal
ifnltournament
By Kevin Rosenfield
Daily Sports Writer
In its final tournament before a four-month hiatus, the
Michigan men's golf team concluded its fall season with a 10th-
place finish at the par 71 Stanford Invitational in Palo Alto,
Calif., this weekend. Colorado State won the 54-hole event with
an eight-over-par 860, one stroke ahead of runner-up Georgia
Tech. Michigan finished at 897 (302-295-300), competing
against a 17-team field that included six of the nation's top-25
teams.
Although the young and inexperienced Wolverines exceeded
expectations throughout the fall season, Michigan coach Jim
Carras was nonetheless disappointed by his team's play i*
California.
"Even though this was as competitive ofa tournament as we'll
play all season, I do think we could have performed better than
what we showed," Carras said. "However, inconsistency really
hurt us and kept us from what could have been a super end to a
very, very good fall season."
Although his current string of two consecutive tournament
victories came to a halt, sophomore Mike Harris continued to
pace the Wolverines. After a disappointing opening round,
Harris rebounded to shoot an eight-over-par 221 (76-72-73),
leaving him 11 strokes behind the leader and in 23rd plac
Redshirt freshman Mike Reabe turned in his best performance
as a Wolverine with a 223 (75-73-75). Fellow freshman Kevin
Harris finished at 225 (76-70-79), while Kevin Vernick and
Keith Hinton each tied at 232.
"We've essentially been a three-man team, looking for some
better numbers and consistency from our four and five positions
all season," Carras said. "We got it here from Mike Reabe and
Kevin Harris, but our number two and three players did not play
the caliber of golf they have for us this fall and that really hurt
us."
"Overall, this group has exceeded my expectations from th
start of the year, but we can't be satisfied," Carras said. "Nox
that we have seen the potential this possesses, if we can get some
consistency and remain focused, we can have a terrific spring
season. I'm really excited about what this team can accomplish."

MARGARE TMYERS/Daily
The Michigan tennis team wrapped up its individual season at the Minnesota Ice Volleys in Minneapolis.
Three Wolverines came back to Ann Arbor with bum shoulders, but should be okay to practice this month.

URAL-GREAT (68)
FG FT REB
MIN MA M-A 0-T A F PTS
Bochkarev 31 6-10 1-1 5.9 0 3 14
Sharko 21 1-5 0-0 0.2 1 5 3
Buntin 30 7-8 2-2 1.4 0 1 17
Dvnianiov 27 5-16 0.0 0-1 3 1 13
Pegushin 32 2-8 0.0 3-4 7 2 4
Tchijov 21 3-5 0-0 1-2 1 1 8
Prokhorenko 12 1-2 2.5 1-4 1 4 4
Sheiko 4 0-3 2-2 2-4 0 4 2
Dmtriev 8 1-3 0-0 0-0 0 1 3
Totals 200 26-63 7-10 153613 25 68
FG%: .413. FT%:.300. 3-point FG: 9-20, .450
(Dvinianiov 3-7, Tchijov 2-3, Dmitriev 1-3, Sharko
1-3, Bochkarev 1-1, Buntin 1-1, Pegushin 0-1,
Sheiko 0-1). Blocks: 2 (Buntin 2). Steals: 6
(Bochkarev 3, Sharko 3). Technical Fouls: none.
MICHIGAN (93)
FG FT REB
MIN M-A -MA T A F PTS
Baston 25 7-9 9-15 4-12 2 1 23
Ward 32 7-15 1-3 0-2 2 2 17
Traylor 30 7-14 4-6 4-10 1 2 18
Reid 28 3-5 0-0 1-3 3 0 7
Bullock 32 3-9 2-2 1-1 6 1 11
Taylor 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Oliver 9 0-0 0-0 0-0 3 0 0
Asselin 12 2-3 3-4 1-3 1 0 7
Smith 18 3-5 2-4 2-4 1 2 10
Szyndlar 1 0-0 0-00- 0 0 0
Vig ier 12 0-1 0-2 0-2 0 1 0
Totals 200 32.61 21.36 153919 9 93
FG%: .525. FT%:.583. 3-point FG: &17, .471
(Bullock 3-6, Ward 2-6, Reid 1-3, Smith 2-2).
Blocks: 4 (Baston 2, Asselin, Bullock). Steals: 8
Batn 2, 'FBullock 2, Reid 2, Smith, Vignier).
'TcnclFouls: none.
Ural-Great ........26 42 -68
Michigan ............32 61 -93
At: Crisler Arena. A: 11,529.

TOURNAMENT
Continued from Page 9
"I'm glad that it was my senior year
that we got to do something and got to
meet all of our goals" Flachs said.
Should the Wolverines' not get a bid,
the six seniors on the team will have
played in their last collegiate games.
"It all went by so fast, I can't believe
that field hockey is over for good now,"
senior goalkeeper Amy Helber said.
Karen Johnson, the mother of senior
defender Shelley Johnson, was quick to
point out after Sunday's loss that the
Wolverines had nothing to be ashamed
of.
"Marcia said at the beginning of the
season 'Okay girls what do you want to
do?' they said 'win the Big Ten' so she
said 'Okay lets get to work,"' Johnson
said.
"I'd be really disappointed if none of
these great things had happened to us,"
Flachs said.

WISCONSIN
Continued from Page 9
"This is a championship game,"
Carr said. "If we win it we have a tie
for the Big Ten championship and if
Wisconsin wins its last two, they go to
the Rose Bowl."
Not to say that a loss will trigger the
same effect this time, but it will cer-
tainly soften the impact of last week's
impressive victory and put Wisconsin
comfortably ahead of Michigan in the
Rose Bowl race.
"You don't vote on the Big Ten
championship," Carr said. "You have
to go out there and win it."
TAYLOR ON THE MEND: Safety
Daydrion Taylor, who blasted Penn
State tight end Bob Stephenson with a
scary hit in the second quarter
Saturday, is out for at least the remain-
der of the regular season with a
sprained neck ligament, according to
Carr.

Stephenson had just caught a swing
pass near the Penn State sideline, and
after rumbling a few yards, put his
head down and clashed heads with'
Taylor. Both laid unconscious for
few minutes.
"I don't ever remember seeing a hit
like that and I knew when both those
kids did not get up that it was a scary
situation," Carr said.
Taylor was fitted for a soft cast yes-
terday afternoon, and his status for a
bowl game we be re-evaluated as he
progresses.
"That was a scary play, I can assure
you of that," Carr said. "ThankfullyW
both players are OK."
AHH YEAH: Apparently, some of
All-planet Charles Woodson's cocki-
ness has rubbed off on the usually
lowJkey Carr.
"At some point in the third quarter,
when we went up 31-0, the thought
went through my mind, 'Hey, we're a
pretty good football team,"' Carr said.

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