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November 01, 1997 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1997-11-01
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6 --- The igan Daily - Footbd -- November 1, 199P

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QUICK INFO

NMember 1, 1997 -Fo

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ader of the

Best

Minnesota
1996 Record: 1-7
place), 4-7 overall

Big Ten {tie-9th

Junior safety Marcus Ray is the leader and part-time coach of the nation's best secondary

Coach: Glen Mason, 1st season
Last meeting: Michigan 44,
Minnesota 10; Oct. 26, 1996
Overall series: Mich. leads, 61-23-3
Key players
QB Cory Sauter, Sr.
WR Tutu Atwell, Sr.
SS Tyrone Carter, So.

By Aim Odiss
Daily Sprs Edior
eadership in the athletic arena is sup-
posed to remain at a particular level.
Provide a little bit of motivation, encour-
agement or a challenge. A simple pat on the
back, a joking insult, or even a moment aside
with a naive rookie will suffice. Rarely does
leadership go further than that.
Marcus Ray has taken the meaning of lead-
ership to a new level.
"Having him on the field is like having
another coach on the field," Michigan sec-
ondary coach Vance Bedford said of his junior
safety. "He's taken on a huge leadership role
since (co-captain and linebacker) Eric Mayes
went down for the season. He's just tremen-
dous."
In a secondary with no seniors, Ray has
clearly taken over as the Michigan unit's
unquestioned leader. Although there are veter-
ans back there like Charles Woodson,
Daydrion Taylor, and Andre Weathers, all in
the midst of their third letter-winning seasons,
Ray has stood out this season as the unofficial
spokesman and on-the-field teacher of the
group.
This year, more than ever in recent years,
Michigan's defense has been senior-deficient,
with only five fifth-year seniors currently on
the active roster, which means that many
underclassmen are seeing valuable time on the
field including some in starting roles.
The secondary, although exceptionally tal-
ented, is not immune to this youth movement.
Sophomore Tommy Hendricks has taken over
at the starting strong safety spot and injuries to
Weathers (who even himself, has only seen
rare backup action prior to this season) have
meant crunch-time action for Michigan's trio
of true freshmen cornerbacks - William
Peterson, DeWayne Patmon and James
Whitley.
All of which puts a hefty load on the shoul-
ders of Bedford and the veterans. Although
Woodson calls him the "best secondary coach

in the country," Bedford can't teach these
youngsters experience, Michigan experience,
in particular, especially from the sidelines.
"I have to be a leader with how I perform,"
Ray said, "We rotate in so many young players
like Tommy Hendricks, James Whitley,
William Peterson and DeWayne Patmon. I have
to be a physical presence out there and show
that if I'm up to any challenge any of these
guys should be able to also."
Ray takes pride in watching these young
players develop, but at the same time, knows
he has a responsibility to carry out as far as
keeping their priorities in check.
"They're maturing faster than I or anyone
could have expected them to," he said.
"They're making more plays every week and
the more plays they make, the stronger a sec-
ondary we're going to have.
"But we all have to keep this up. If they
see that I lost faith in us being able to
make it to the Rose Bowl, then they'll3
lose faith too. I can't let them do that." ,

NE

f .

played with."
That confidence as well as their friendship
is why Bedford feels that Ray and Woodson
complement each other so well in the back-
field.
"He and Charles are both very close and I
think their friendship has helped them both
become the kind of players they are today,"
Bedford said. "Marcus has worked extremely
hard in improving each year, not only on the
field, but off it as well as a leader."
Ray also recognizes the value of their
friendship to their football careers.
"We both have a similar appreciation of each
other talents," he said. "We've
established a great personal
friendship and now we're
roommates.
"He's a great person
and he's had a lot to do
with me and where I am
as a football player today.
I love him like a brother."
Woodson's rise to
national stardom has
caught the attention of
every college football fan
in the country, but Ray's
improvement isn't even
remotely documented in the
same manner, even though
he has improved by leaps and bounds
and has the Heisman hopeful rallying
for him in his corner.
"I don't think people realize how
good he is," Woodson said.
Last year, Ray was third on the
Wolverines in tackles with 104, second
in interceptions with three, and broke up
six other passes. This year, it's almost a
mirror image of consistency as Ray is
once again third on the team in tackles with 44
(behind linebacker Sam Sword and Dhani
Jones) and, with four interceptions, trails only
Woodson in that category.
Regardless of who else in on your team,

those numbers appear to be ones that stand out
at people. But, for some reason, they don't.
Instead, people focus on Ray's leadership,
which suits him just fine.
"I don't think in statistical terms the way a
tight end or a receiver does," Ray said. "For
me, I have to make plays and many of them
are measured by statistics."
But his teammates in the secondary aren't
ready to let him get off that easily. Ray's first
interception of the season did not come until
Michigan's sixth game, when he picked off
Iowa quarterback Matt Sherman twice.
Ray said it was a monkey of a joke lifted off
his back.
"I felt I wasn't helping out as far as making
turnovers," Ray said. "(My teammates in the
secondary) were trying to tell me that I wasn't
going to get one all year.
"But everyone else was (getting intercep-
tions) like Tommy, Charles and Daydrion, so I
figured, hey, I might as well join the party as
well."
Since Ray has joined the party, he once
again, trails only Woodson for the team lead in
interceptions. How's that for leadership, young
fellas?

PASSING
Player C-A
Griese 114-177
Brady 12-15
Kapsner 2-3

With Woodson, the All-
American and media darling,
occupying the same sec-
ondary as Ray, it is quite easy
to young players to overlook
the intangibles that Ray
brings to the team, and
instead seek to emulate
Woodson's flair for the glitz
and gab. But Ray's biggest
fan on the team, and the one
who certainly makes sure
the rookies follow Ray's
lead, is none other than
his roommate, Woodson.
"Without a doubt, he
knows our defense better
than anybody else,"
Woodson said. "He is the
smartest guy I've ever

U..

Yds
1319
103
21

RUSHING
Player Att Yds
Howard 105 538
Thomas 86 377.
C. Williams 56 257
Floyd 35 126
RECEIVING
Player No. Yds
Tuman 22 348.
C. Williams 21 178
Howard 20 137
Streets 19 241
Shaw 14 159.
Floyd 7 83
Thomas 6 57
Woodson 5 125:
McCall 5 32
PUNTING
Player No.1
Vinson 311I
Griese 2
KICKOFF RETURNS
Player No. Yds
C. Williams 13 254
PUNT RETURNS
Player No. Yds
Shaw 5 50
Woodson 20 159
Whitley 2 8

MICHIGAN
LEADERS

Avg
5.1
4.4
4.6
3.6
Avg
15.8
8.5
6.9
12.7
11.4
11.9
9.5
25.0
6.4

TD
10
0
0
Lg
51
58
16
14
Lg
53
26
16
41
24
43
26
35
10

Int
4
0
0
TD
4
2
1
2
TD
3
0
1
3
2
0
0
1
0

As Michigan hits the stretch run of its
schedule, the temptation of thinking ahead to
opponents like Penn State or Ohio State, or the
opportunity of playing in the Rose Bowl,
stares the typical freshman down like a tenured
professor. Michigan's young defense, ranked in
the nation's top five in most categories, has
every reason to get a little cocky and have a
tendency to think that talent will get it past
each opponent. This is when the leader in Ray
shines through again.
"If we keep playing like this, there's no
question we can get (to the Rose Bowl," Ray
said. "I tell everyone that and we know that if
we play Michigan football, we'll dominate."
That's leadership.

Yds Avg Lg
285 41.5 54
76 38.0 39
Avg Lg TD
19.5 28 0

Avg
10.0
8.0
4.0

Lg
22
20
5

TD
0
0
0

m

Big House may get bigger by 5,200 seats

By JmtAdy
Wl Staff Repoter
After receiving a wave of negative
feedback from first-year students who
got split-season football tickets,
Michigan Athletic Director Thomas
Goss is taking action to correct the
problem.
The Board in Control of
Intercollegiate Athletics approved
Goss' proposal yesterday to add 5,200
seats to Michigan Stadium for a total of
107,701 seats, making it easily the
largest arena in the nation.
"This whole pwject dafted with doe
need to aacnmderuia fma-year stu-
dents as we moe foxaid ink 199Vw
Goss said. be issue is, ifyoua a stm.
dent, you should be able to experience a
football game"

The proposal seeks to add four rows
of seats to the top of the stadium, which
would first make room for the 3,000
students who received split-season tick-
ets, and then free-up tickets for the hun-
dreds of fans who were unable to pur-
chase season tickets this year.
The estimated cost of the expansion
is $6 million, which Goss said will be
paid for through the course of the next
eight years through the revenue gener-
ated by the extra seats.
If approved by the University Board
of Regents, construction would begin
after this year football season is over,
and would be scheduled to be finished
by de begihuingofamt season. Goss
said he hopes the proposal will be on
de agenda of next month regents'
meeting.

Goss attributed the increased demand
for tickets to the addition of Penn State
to the Big Ten Conference three years
ago.
"Now that Penn State is in the Big
Ten, we think that assures us a quality
schedule," Goss said. "It almost guaran-
tees you a sellout every year."
The new rows would be supported by
brick columns and encased in brick that
would match the existing brick fence
that surrounds the stadium.
"It's actually going to improve the
looks of the stadium," said Walter
Harrison, Vice President for University
Relations.
Harrisonwho serves on the Board in
Control of Intercollegiate Athletics,
said the addition will not be used to pro-
vide more corporate boxes or make

other drastic changes to the stadium.
"What we're really trying to do is
accommodate all the students who want
tickets," Harrison said.
The stadium would be expanded by
eight feet, allowing for the much-need-
ed addition of restrooms, and the possi-
ble relocation of vendors to directly
under the stadium, Harrison said.
Goss said the idea for the expansion
was not motivated by a desire to have
the country's biggest stadium.,
"It's nice to have the largest stadium,
but it's even better to come up with
some alternatives for our students,"
Goss said.
Associate Medical Prof. Steve
Papadopolous, financial chair of the
board in control of intercollegiate ath-
letics, said he feels confident that the

renovation will pay for itself.
"History has told us that the demand
for regular season ticket holders stays
relatively constant," Papadopolous said.
Goss said he is optimistic that the
regents will vote in favor of the propos-
al.
"I think they recognize what our
problems are this year," Goss said.
"Since the priority will be students first
and everyone else second, that should
fit into the regents overall objectives."
Students said they were pleased Goss
has come up with a solution to the tick-
et shortage problem.
"Increased seating will be beneficial
to all the students," said LSA first-year
student Michael Frishman. "Since our
football team is so good our stadium,
should be expanded."

DEFENSE
Player
Sword
Jones
Ray
Woodson
J. Williams
Hendricks
Steele
Renes
Hall
Mayes
Weathers
Copenhaver
Peterson
Taylor
Gold
Whitley
Feazell
Patmon
Wilson
Frysinger

Solo
44
37
24
23
19
17
19
19
15
15
16
12
15
12
9
11
6
4
4
5

Asst
17
16
20
10
14
14
11
9
11
10
8
10
4
3
6
2
6
5
4
0

Tot
61
53
44
33
33
31
30
28
26
25
24
22
19
15
15
13
12
9
8
5

Staff
Picks
- all picks made
against the
spread.
Game (HOME TEAM IN CAPS)
MICHIGAN (-26) vs. Minnesota
Ohio State (-6) vs. MICHIGAN STATE
INDIANA (-4 1/2) vs. Illinois
IOWA (-11) vs. Purdue

NICHOLAS J.
COTSONIKA
Minnesota
Ohio State
Indiana
Iowa

<

ALAN
GOLDENBACH

JOHN
LEROI

Penn State (-16 1/2) vs. NORTHWESTERN Penn State

PASS DEFENSE
Player Int Yds

Woodson
Ray
Hendricks
Copenhaver
Jones
Patmon
Sword

5
4
2
1.
1
1

7
36
0
19
17
0
0

Lg
4
30
0
19
17
0
0

Brk-up
1
3
2
0
0
I

TD
0
0
0
0
0,
0
0

ARIZONA ST. (-3 1/2) vs. Wash. St.
FLORIDA (-20) vs. Georgia
Louisiana State (-6) vs. KENTUCKY
SYRACUSE (-10 1/2) vs. West Virginia
TEXAS A&M (-9) vs. Oklahoma State
Best Bet
ast week
Overall
OvrI best bet

Washington St.
Florida
Louisiana State
West Virginia
Oklahoma State
Ohio State
7-3
51-37
3-5

Minnesota
Michigan State
Indiana
Iowa
Penn State
Washington St.
Florida
Kentucky
West Virginia
Texas A&M
Washington State
64
43.45
3-5

Minne
Ohio S
India
low
Penn 1
Washing
Geor
Kentu
West Vi
Oklahom
Ohio S
54
43,4
3"R

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