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October 29, 1997 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-10-29

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I

LOCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily -Thursday. October 30,1997 - 5A

&tudent
runs for
leukemia
harity
Engineering junior
plans to run marathon
in Disney World
By Kristin Wright
aily Staff Reporter
Running 26 miles through Walt
Disney World isn't your usual trip to
the theme park.
But in efforts to raise funds for the
Leukemia Society of America, one
University student will go the dis-
tance.
"I know that if they can fight
leukemia, I can run a marathon,"
said Engineering junior Kori
artini, who's running in the
anuary run.
Martini said that after volunteering
with leukemia patients last summer,
she decided that she wanted to make a
difference in the fight against the dis-
ease.
Participants in the running, walk-
ing or cycling marathons must raise
$3,500 for research by Dec. 20 in
order to be eligible for the
marathon.
If the required amount of funds is
met by marathon participants, the
Leukemia Society of America pays for
all travel arrangements and marathon
UAAO
flls two
leadership
positions
O UAAO determines its
dance on affirmative
action
By Margene Eriksen
Daily Staff Reporter
As members tossed M&M's and
Starbursts to each other, the United
Asian American Organizations pre-
pared to vote two members into leader-
ship positions yesterday.
The elections were the first in a two-
9t election process, and filled the posts
of UAAO chair and program chair.
"Basically, they set the tone for the
next year. People who are running will
give their vision for the future of our
organization. Included in that would be
what needs to be changed," said
Sudhakar Cherukari, current UAAO
chair. Cherukari will give up his posi-
tion in January.
LSA junior Rahul Shah was elected
replace Cherukari. He faced no
position. Shah will oversee the orga-
nization starting this January, with a
term lasting through all of 1998.
"I choose to run because I wanted to

make a difference. I want to see the
Asian Pacific American community do
things to increase people's awareness of
all sorts of issues, including political,
cultural and social ones," Shah said
LSA sophomore Kim Pham will
*come the new program chair. Pham
W challenged by Art junior Thuyen
Tang.
"I ran because I saw an opportunity

Students march on
Diag to support
Clean Air Act

JOHN KRAFT/Daily
Engineering Junior Kori Martini will run through Disney World in a January marathon for the Leukemia Society of America.

registration fees.
Martini is $2,000 shy of the goal.
"I sent letters to corporate sponsors,
friends and family," Martini said.
If her fundraising efforts are suc-
cessful, Martini will run the
marathon with 60 other partici-
pants.
"To me, it's people working together
and raising funds to find a cure for
leukemia," said Beth Smith, campaign
manager for the Leukemia Society of
America.
Marathon participants are chosen
by an application process, in which
most applicants older than 18 are
accepted.
The Leukemia Society provides

coaches to prepare participants for the
26-mile run.
The four- to six-month training pro-
gram consists of group runs four days
a week, injury treatment information
and nutritional guidance.
Participants are matched with
individual leukemia patients,
referred to as honors patients.
The incentive is that marathon
participants are running, walking or
cycling for their honors patient,
Martini said.
The goal, finishing the marathon, is
not a selfish one..
"We both win," Martini said.
LSA sophomore Michael Berger is
impressed by Martini's commitment to

fighting leukemia.
"She's a true inspirational story,
because she's sacrificing her personal
betterment for the good of less fortu-
nate people," Berger said.
The Leukemia Society of America is
a non-profit organization that coordi-
nates fundraisers and implements
other methods of furthering research
for leukemia.
For further information on the bian-
nual marathon, please contact the
Leukemia Society of America at (810)
778-6800.
To donate to Martini's effort, send
checks payable to the Leukemia
Society to 1735 Washtenaw Ave., Ann
Arbor, Ml 48104.

By Gerard Cohn-Vrignaud
Daily Staff Reporter
Student environmental activists
held a rally on the Diag yesterday to
encourage President Clinton and
members of Congress to pass the
Clean Air Act.
The rally, which was supported by
ENACT (Environmental Action), the
Ecology Center of Ann Arbor and the
Environmental Information Center,
involved about a dozen people and took
place on the steps of the Harlan Hatcher
Graduate Library. Students attending the
rally spoke about environmental issues,
performed a skit and even sang to
passersby.
Although the mood of the rally was
jovial, the central issue was more ser-
ous.
"We want stronger standards," said
Environmental Information Center
Campus Coordinator Ami Grace.
"Global warming and clean air standards
are pressing environmental concerns for
the, environmental community and, for
that matter, anyone who breathes"
Grace said ENACT has collected
more than 1,000 signatures in support of
the Clean Air Act.
Clinton has expressed support for the
Clean Air Act, which would update
health standards for smog and soot, but
corporate polluters such as GM, Mobil
and Texaco have been lobbying members
of Congress to roll back the standards.
President Clinton and Vice
President Gore held a summit on
global warming earlier this month.
Clinton announced at that time that
"realistic binding goals" and econom-

"1 th ink
individuals need
to act up and
speak out."
- Katherine Devendorf
LSA sophomore
ically feasible solutions needed to be
established globally. Participants at
the rally said they thought Clinton's
stance was too weak.
"I think individuals need to act up
and speak out,' said LSA sophomore
Katherine Devendorf. "We need to
appeal to the highest levels of govern-
ment. It concerns me that Clinton's
announcement was so vague. He was
pretty wishy-washy."
The ralliers held up a banner that read
"4% of world population, 22% of world
pollution. The US must consume less,
conserve more," and chanted a song
titled "Climate Goblins" to the Adams
Family tune. In addition, the students per-
formed a skit in which two young chil-
dren go trick-or-treating on corporate
polluter land.
According to the Environmental
Protection Agency, the new standards
would prevent 15,000 premature
deaths and 350,000 cases of aggra-
vated asthma. In addition, the EPA
estimates that meeting the new stan-
dards would cost $6.5-8.5 billion but
would be greatly outweighed by a
savings of $120 billion in medical
costs and lost work days.

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EMILY NATHAN/Daily
University student Hehshin Kwok listens to chair candidates speak about the future direction of the United Asian American
Organization at the group's annual elections. UAAO members also decided their stance on affirmative action last night.

to help increase interaction between the
other Asian groups and non-Asian
groups an campus. I feel like (UAAO)
is a vehicle that can accomplish this
goal," Pham
said
To win the
elections,
candidatesa
needed a because I

Asian American groups on campus.
Representatives from each of the 18
groups has an official vote in the elec-
tions, but all members can comment on
the candidates.
The group
also voted,

. .

ruun
wanted to

majority of
I1 out of 21
votes. Next
week's elec-
tion will
focus on the

make a difference."
- Rahul Shah
Newly elected UAAO Chair

after much
debate, to add
its support to a
formal state-
ment support-
ing affirmative
action. The
statement is
scheduled to

regress the effects that have been made
so far," Pham said.
Many UAAO members said that if
the lawsuit is passed, the organization
will remain strong on campus.
"Asian Pacific Americans are in a
very pivotal role on this campus, and
we have a very unique role in the affir-
mative action debate," Shah said.
"There is a lot of education that needs
to be done both with the UAAO com-
munity, and at U of M in general.
All the elected positions within
UAAO are equal, Cherukari said -
they just involve different amounts of
work. The group's chair is responsible
for University relations, representing
UAAO's interests to other Asian Pacific
Americans in the community and "set-
ting the vision of the group," Cherukari
said.

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UAAO is called an umbrella organi-
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"I feel that it's necessary for the
UAAO to endorse something like the
statement. In this point in time, doing
away with affirmative action is going to

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