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October 24, 1997 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-10-24

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 24, 1997 - 7

LEROI
itlnued from Page 1
they were never taught to do so.
Of course things change. I grew up. I
don't have the same hatred coursing
through my veins for the University of
Michigan like I once did. But no matter
how old I get, or how many of those
kids grow up and attend the other
schoolthere will always be memories. I
still know which kids in my fifth-grade
'ss rooted for Michigan and which
s rooted for Michigan State.
Those kind of kids are still out there.
This rivalry means more to them than
Saturday morning cartoons and
Halloween candy. Somehow, helping
dad rake leaves before the game isn't so
much of a chore when The Game is your
reward.
It's funny. You can pack thousands of
people, hip-to-hip, into the stadium and
it still smells better than the week
* re. It can be bitter coldaand some-
how, it feels warmer. The game moves
slower, every play matters.
And we must wait a decade before
that feeling creeps back. Every year the

game is big for Spartan fans. There's
always a chance they can upset mighty
Michigan. But in 1987, they didn't need
an upset, just a great college football
team. People knew going into the game
that Michigan State didn't just have a
chance, they had a right to win the
game.
This year that feeling is back. Sedrick
Irvin looks an awful lot like Lorenzo
White (though his number is one off).
The Spartans' defense just as ferocious
now as it was then.
In East Lansing, it's not the talk of the
town, it is the town.
No football game has been this spe-
cial in the town for a long time. Now, 10
years and 14 days later, it is again. Now,
I am a member of the media, and I'm
not supposed to care who wins. Maybe
I don't. Maybe I just long for that excite-
ment again. Maybe a decade wasn't too
long to wait.
And maybe, just maybe, a bunch of
fifth-graders are feeling exactly what I
felt 10 years ago.
Maybe I am feeling it again, too.
- John Leri can be reached via
e-mail atjrleroi@umich. edu.

ONO

Staff
Picks
- all picks made
against the
spread.
Game (HOME TEAM IN CAPS)
Michigan (-2 1/2) MICHIGAN STATE
IOWA (-26) vs. Indiana
OHIO STATE (-22) vs. Northwestern
Purdue (-10 1/2) vs. ILLINOIS
Wisconsin (-6) vs. MINNESOTA
MARSHALL (-21) vs. Eastern Michigan
Florida State (-19) vs. VIRGINIA
WEST VIRGINIA (-1) vs. Virginia Tech
Auburn (-16) vs. ARKANSAS
Nebraska (-36 1/2) vs. KANSAS
Best Bet
Last week
Overall
Overall best bet

'1

NICHOLAS J.
COTSONIKA

Michigan
Indiana
Ohio State
Purdue
Minnesota
Eastern Michigan
Florida State
West Viginia
Auburn
Kansas
Indiana
6-4
44-34
3-4

ALAN
GOLDENBACH
Michigan
Iowa
Northwestern
Purdue
Wisconsin
Marshall
Florida State
Virginia Tech
Auburn
Nebraska
Northwestern
4-6
37-41
3-4

JOHN
LEROI

DANIELLE
RUMORE

Michigan
Indiana
Ohio State
Purdue
Wisconsin
Eastern Michigan
Florida State
Virginia Tech
Auburn
Nebraska
Indiana
3-T
38-40
3-4>

Michigan
Indiana
Ohio State
Purdue
Wisconsin
Marshall
Florida State
West Virginia
Auburn
Kansas
Purdue
6-4
37-41
1-6

SPARTANS
Continued from Page 1
Michigan is first in passing defense (143.6) and Michigan
State is fifth (198.4).
Michigan has the second-best total defense in the nation
(207.7) while Michigan State is ranked 12th overall (279.0).
The Spartans' defense starts with linebacker Ike
Reese. He leads the Spartans in total tackles with 53 and
has 2 1/2 sacks for six lost yards this season. Throw in
defensive end Robaire Smith and defensive tackle
Desmond Thomas, to name a few, and the Spartans have
their stifling rush defense.
"They have a great defense," Williams said. "They have
great linebackers. Ike Reese is very aggressive. I don't think
that's changed our game plan. We're still going to try to run
football."
. he Spartans' rush defense could give Michigan's ground

game fits, which has

struggled with inconsistency this sea-

son. It is not helped by running back Chris Howard's situa-
tion. He suffered a rib injury in last week's game against Iowa
and may still be feeling the effects tomorrow.
However, the Spartans will have to deal with the possible
loss of starting defensive end Dimitrius Underwood. He is
listed as questionable by Michigan State coach Nick Saban
after suffering a knee injury last Saturday.
The Spartans' solid secondary may also take a hit if junior
cornerback Amp Campbell can't play. Saban said Campbell,
too, is questionable after re-aggravating a hamstring injury
and hurting his shoulder against the Wildcats.
If the Wolverines struggle offensively, like they did for
much of last week's game against the Hawkeyes, they can
look to their defense to bail them out.
The defense has been stellar week in and week out, and had
one of its best performances of the season last week, despite
the final score.

TELEVISION
Continued from Page 1
tions.
Television has not only been a casual
observer of football, but has affected
the game as well. Nowadays, game
times are regularly scheduled to fit tele-
vision time slots.
"I think television has brought
both good and bad things to the
game," Madej said. "For example,
we don't like starting the game at
3:30. We like 12 just fine. Television
is a mixed bag. The good part is that
it allows fans and alumni across the
state and the nation to see the
game."

In addition, the televising of foot-
ball and other sports has brought
millions of dollars in advertising
sales to broadcast companies. At the
first televising of the Michigan-
Michigan State confrontation, signs
for advertisers were held in front of
the camera.
Many Michigan students will watch
the game on television rather than pay
the stiff prices scalpers are asking. For
many, television serves as a lower-cost
alternative to viewing the game in per-
son.
"My friend said he could get six tick-
ets for $700" said LSA first-year stu-
dent Brian Pierce. "That's a little too
steep."

If he cannot find less expensive tick-
ets, Pierce said he will probably watch
the game on TV. Television viewing,
however, is a poor substitute for actual-
ly being present at the game, Pierce
said.
"By watching it on TV, you don't get
the full effect of the motion of the
game," Pierce said. "When you're at the
game, your heart starts to pump. You
have to be there."
Other students expressed similar
sentiments. "You feel the excitement
of the crowd," said SNRE first-year
student Joel Cupp. "There's an elec-
tricity at the game. When 100,400
people sing the fight song, it's
amazing."

Coach search turns to Reid as he
arrives for interview with Goss

I I

,a"Dan Stillman
aily Sports Writer
Suddenly, the search for the next
Michigan men's basketball coach has
focused on Roger Reid.
The ex-Brigham Young coach
arrived in Ann Arbor late last night
and was scheduled to interview with
University Athletic Director Tom
Goss today.
After playing phone tag for almost
meek, Goss was finally able to con-
dct a phone interview which lasted
about an hour according to Reid.
By today, Goss had hoped to have
filled the vacancy he created when he
fired coach Steve Fisher on Oct. 11.
Since then, Goss has reportedly con-
ducted face-to-face interviews with
at least six candidates. But Reid and
Savannah College of Art and
Design's Cazzie Russell are the only
ididates Goss has confirmed.
Illinois State's Kevin Stallings was
believed to be the leading candidate
':until yesterday when speculation
erupted that Reid would be hired for
the job. But there was no official

indication that anything more than a
live interview between the two had
been set up.
Goss has also reportedly met with
Kansas assistant
coaches Matt
Doherty and Neil
Dougherty as
well as Southern
California coach
Henry Bibby
about the posi-
tion.
Reid said yes-
terday from his
Goss home in Provo,
Utah, that he is
excited for the opportunity talk with
Goss in person.
"I think I bring a great deal of
respect integrity, honesty and a
proven track record," Reid said.
Reid coached at Brigham Young
throughout his entire career, racking
up a 152-77 record until he was
abruptly fired seven games into last
season. The Cougars were 1-6 at the
time and school officials cited strug-

gling attendance as a factor in Reid's
firing.
But a highly publicized argument a
month before between Reid and
recruit who chose Duke over
Brigham Young may have also been a
factor.
Following his father's firing, Reid's
son Robbie who played for his father
at Brigham Young, transferred to
Michigan this fall and will play for
the Wolverines.
Before taking over as coach in
1989, Reid served as an assistant
coach for I1 years. He has also been
a member of several basketball-relat-
ed committees throughout his career,
including the recruiting committee
for the National Association of
Basketball Coaches and USA
Basketball.
"I just think there's so much I can
offer," Reid said. "I'm right at the
prime of my coaching ability."
When asked about the search
before Goss had gotten in touch with
him, Reid said: "(Goss) hasn't talked
to the best candidate yet."

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