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October 20, 1997 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1997-10-20

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NATION/WORLD

The Michigan Daily - Monday, October 20, 1997 - 7A

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ie,

AP PHOTO
Samtuel Sheinbeln, 17, waits for his hearing at a court in Petah Tlkvah, a suburb of Tel Aviv, Friday. Facing growing U.S. pres-
sure, Israel's attorney general said that Sheinbein can be extradited.
Israel denies citizenship to
youth accused of killing
Los Angeles Times

JERUSALEM - Yesterday, Israel's
4gtorney general rejected the citizenship
im of an American teen-ager wanted
murder in Maryland and said the
17-year-old fugitive can be returned to
the United States to stand trial.
U.S.-Israeli relations have been
strained over the extradition case of
Samuel Sheinbein, a high school
senior from Silver Spring, Md., who
fled to Israel last month to avoid pros-
ecution.
Sheinbein and another youth are
*used of killing Alfredo Tello Jr., 19,
whose charred and dismembered body
was found in the Washington suburb
Sept. 18.
Although Sheinbein has never lived
in Israel, he claimed to be a citizen on
the basis of his father's citizenship.
Under Israeli law, a citizen cannot be
extradited for prosecution of a crime
committed in another country.
Secretary of State Madeleine
:Wright and American Jewish leaders
had urged the Israeli government to

return Sheinbein. As Israel investigated
the claim, angry members of the U.S.
Congress delayed the release of mil-
lions of dollars in U.S. aid to Israel.
Israeli officials had declared they
would not be pressured into handing
over Sheinbein but had made it clear
that they were searching for a legal way
to extradite the youth. The case also has
raised racial tensions between Jews and
Hispanics in the United States, and
caused consternation among Israelis
who do not want their country used as a
refuge for Jewish criminals.
Israeli Attorney General Elyakim
Rubinstein issued a statement Sunday
saying, "After a careful examination of
the matter of citizenship, the position of
the Ministry of Justice is that
(Sheinbein) is not an Israeli citizen."
Therefore, the statement said, "there
is a basis to assume that the suspect
can be extradited under the extradition
law."
The attorney general's statement did
not explain on what grounds the ministry
had determined that Sheinbein is not a

citizen. Justice Ministry spokesperson
Etty Eshed said the arguments will be
presented Monday at a hearing in
Jerusalem to request the youth's "arrest
for extradition" Until now, he has been
held "for investigation."
The United States provided Israel
with hundreds of documents in the
case, including depositions stating that
Sheinbein's family sought citizenship in
the United States and other countries
after leaving Israel in the 1950s. The
Israeli newspaper Haaretz reported that
the government has interpreted this to
mean the Sheinbeins had no intention
of returning to Israel and that the fact
they had retained Israeli citizenship
over the years was only a formality.
Sheinbein's lawyer, former Justice
Minister David Libai, disagreed with the
attorney general's ruling, which he called
"a clear attempt to bypass Israeli law,"
and said he will challenge it in court.
Sheinbein's extradition must still be
approved by an Israeli court. An appeal,
even if it is denied, could hold up extra-
dition for months.

Bosnia's ethnic division spils
into the classroom, hurts spint

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in Room B1276 at the Business School Feel free to call
Kelly Roddy at 1-800-545-0482 for additional
information. You may also like to visit our website
at http://www.mckinsey.com.

War-ravaged country's ethical split
reaches into its schools as classes are
segregated
Los Angeles Times
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina - When classes
opened in the Muslim-Croat half of Bosnia this fall, many
teachers began enacting a new set of rules: segregating stu-
dents based on their ethnicity.
Children and their parents have been told to fill out question-
res asking their religion. In some schools, students were told
ise their hands to signal whether they are Muslims or Croats.
Parallel curricula are being taught - Muslim children take
one set of courses, Roman Catholic Croatian children anoth-
er. Minority children in some cases have been removed to
separate classrooms. Education Ministry officials who
ordered the ethnic polling defend the program as "separate
but equal." Human rights officials, and many parents and
teachers, are outraged, calling it a dangerous attempt to cre-
ate ethnically pure classrooms and cement Bosnia's partition.
The division of children and the use of parallel curricula
reported to be the products of a deal struck between the
two hard-line ruling parties in the Muslim-Croat Federation,
as this half of Bosnia-Herzegovina is known.
"Instead of building joint educational foundations for all

Bosnia and Herzegovina ... we are witnessing (an attempt) by
nationalistic leaders to take one step further toward splitting
Bosnia and Herzegovina along its ethnic boundaries," Srdjan
Dizdarevic, president of the Bosnian branch of the Helsinki
Committee for Human Rights, wrote in a protest letter.
International officials say the plan violates the spirit, and
perhaps the letter, of December 1995 U.S.-brokered peace
accords that ended Bosnia's 3 1/2-year war - a conflict in
which religion was used as a pretext for fighting and the "eth-
nic cleansing" that purged regions of hundreds of thousands
of people. One of the goals of the accords is to reunite
Bosnia's fractured and once-multiethnic society, but national-
ists on all sides continue to fight against reconciliation.
Education Ministry officials insist that the plan provides
for "separate but equal" schooling that allows the region's
two principal ethnic groups to preserve their cultural identi-
ties. No provisions are made for Serbs or other minorities.
"It is their constitutional right to find out everything there
is to know about their culture, tradition and history," Abdulah
Jabucar, assistant education minister, said in an interview.
Jabucar allowed, however, that polling students' religions
and forcing their separation was a clumsy way to go about it.
Parallel education systems, Jabucar said, are actually a
holdover from the war, when the Muslim-led Sarajevo govern-
ment used one curriculum, while Croats were using a system
set up by their self-proclaimed ministate of Herceg-Bosnia.

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