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September 03, 1997 - Image 61

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The Michigan Daily, 1997-09-03

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ANN ARBOR

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, September 3, 1997 - 5E

BESTAURANTS
Continued from Page 1E
home from The Blind Pig. Popular
menu items include "The hippie break-
fast," as well as "The meaty hippie
breakfast."
Angelo's - If you can wake up
before 1 p.m. on a Saturday morning
and are patient enough to stand in a
fowded waiting room or on the side-
Ulk on Catherine Street, then Angelo's
is the place to go for breakfast or lunch.
Angelo's thick French toast and nearly
football-sized omelets makes this small
restaurant very popular, but very worth
the wait.
Pizza House - Located in a reno-
vated house on Church Street, Pizza
House offers limited seating and an
extensive take-out menu. The late night
hotspot is most famous for its chipati -
*alad contained by a bowl of warm,
soft bread, served with a zippy orange
sauce, and is a variation of a traditional
Indian dish. Pizza House makes mouth-
watering pizza, subs and breadsticks,
but their prices are on the high end.
"I don't like Pizza House because
they charge too much," said LSA
sophomore Susan Hernandez.
Regardless of the price, students con-
tinue to shell out money for their cal-
Ones and pitas, making "The House" a
dietary staple of everyone from all
walks of University life.
The Brown Jug - One of cam-
pus's oldest hangouts, this South
University Avenue gathering spot spe-
cializes in nostalgia and Wolverine
decor. Students at "the Jug" can be seen
eating anything from spinach pie to
pizza and will most likely be complain-
ing that they don't have enough money
go to a real restaurant. Although the
's appeal is its college-hangout feel,
students say the variety of their menu is
a plus.
"Sometimes they don't card you, and
I like the rice pudding," said LSA senior
Miles Uhlar.
Backroom Pizza - An annex to
The Brown Jug, Backroom's staff of
animated dough throwers churn out hot,
yummy pizzas fast and sell generous-
ed slices for only $1. Backroom is
en until 3 a.m. on weekends and is a
great place to run into all of your
friends after a night of partying.
A taste of something
different
The Blue Nile - If eating without

utensils doesn't bother you and unique
spices agree with your palate, The Blue
Nile is your place for dinner. This
authentic Ethiopian restaurant serves
all-you-can-eat dinners cooked with
lots of onions and their special berbere
sauce - a blend of 14 different spices
and vegetables - in an authentic
Ethiopian atmosphere.
"If anyone wants to come to The Blue
Nile for dinner, they must come with an
empty stomach just to experience the
difference Blue Nile manager Habte
Dadi said.
Meals are presented in hand-woven
grass baskets called "mesobs" and cus-
tomers are given hot towels to wash
their hands before diving into the fla-
vorful cuisine. Vegetarian dishes are
their specialty, and be sure to order the
spiced Ethiopian tea or full-bodied
Ethiopian coffee.
Seva - Ann Arbor's oldest vege-
tarian restaurant, Seva serves meatless
cuisine in a casual, plant-filled atmos-
phere. Located on Liberty Street, Seva's
specialties include tempeh burgers,
squash enchiladas and baked brie with
sun-dried tomato pesto. Seva also offers
and extensive selection of beer and
wine and is in the process of adding a
raw juice and cappuccino bar.
Zingerman's Deli - If spending
all your time between State Street and
South University Avenue is making you
feel like you live in a bubble, take a
walk outside of campus to Kerrytown,
and you'll find the most exotic deli in
Ann Arbor. Zingerman's sandwich
menu is intimidatingly long to the first-
time visitor, but with their fresh-baked
bread and fresh-sliced meat, you can
hardly go wrong, whether you pick
"Helen's Have Another" or "Big Al's
Saturday Night Special."
"When you come here it's a
Zingerman's experience," said
Zingerman's manager Toni Morell.
"When you walk in you're truly mes-
merized."
Don't feel too overwhelmed by the
hundreds of oils and cheeses the deli
carries - Zingerman's publishes
guides to both olive oil and vinegar.'
Mongolian Barbecue - Feeling
creative? This make-your-own-stirfry
restaurant gives you a bottomless bowl,
lets you combine your favorite meats,
vegetables and oils, puts them on a grill
and serves your creation with rice and
tortillas.
"The atmosphere is a lot different
from other restaurants because it's so
social;' said Mongolian Barbecue man-
ager Roxanne Fish. "You're up and

ROB GILMORE/Daily
LSA sophomore Erin Dewsbury and LSA senior Amit Gaggar enjoy a pitcher of beer and some laughs at The Brown Jug. Located on South University Avenue, The Brown
Jug is one of the most famous and popular student hangouts in Ann Arbor.

moving around, which makes it more
fun."
Shalimar - Located across from
Mongolian Barbecue on Main Street,
Shalimar serves traditional Indian cui-
sine in booths with green vinyl seats.
Much of the meat is prepared Tandoor
style - skinned and marinated in
yogurt before being cooked on skewers
in igloo-shaped clay ovens.
"Best chicken I've ever had," praised
Nursing junior Lee Saltzman.
Curry is abundant on Shalimar's
menu and the restaurant also offers a
wide selection of Indian beers.
Dinersty - If you're in the mood
for real food but don't feel like getting
dressed up or leaving a tip, Chinese
take-out from Dinersty is a sati'fying
option. Dinersty has the traditional

Chinese fare with everything from won-
ton soup to sweet and sour chicken.
Fine dining
Palio - With the kitchen right at
the front of the restaurant, this northern
Italian restaurant puts an emphasis on
the preparation of food.
"We specialize in hearty portions and
rustic cooking," Palio manager Jon
Gould said, noting that the restaurant
has the most extensive chianti list in all
of Michigan. Their unique rooftop din-
ing - known as the dizko del sol -
makes the restaurant a summer favorite.
"I like all the jugs of wine and the
jars of tomatoes they've got along the
walls," Uhlar said.
The Real Seafood Co. - With a

large, raw fish displayed prominently
on its bar, The Real Seafood Co. lives
up to its name, in decor as well as food.
"We cook with rather classic and tra-
ditional preparations of the highest
quality seafood available," said Chef
Michael McKellar.
In addition to offering lobster, oys-
ters, salmon and swordfish in their spa-
cious, well-lit dining room, the restau-
rant also has tables on the sidewalk out-
side the restaurant. The Real Seafood
Co. hosts special theme nights, like last
February's women's cigar diner.
Sweet Lorraine's - Also located
in Kerrytown (best to drive there - it's
too fancy for walking garb) is Sweet
Lorraine's. The menu features tradition-
al American cooking with a twist -
Jamaican jerk steak, pecan chicken and

Caribbean sweet potato chips. Even
more unique is their artistic decor,
which uses bright colors and mural-like
artwork.
Gandy Dancer - Unless you
make a lot of money this summer, you
most likely won't go here until your
parents come to visit. Gandy Dancer is
one of Ann Arbor's swankiest restau-
rants and its location aside the train
tracks allows for an occasional inter-
ruption of the silent, stuffy atmosphere.
The food, however, is exceptional.
With so many options available,
choosing a restaurant may seem like a
difficult task. But don't worry: The
average student takes about 4 1/2 years
to graduate - plenty of time to hit all
the these and many other restaurants in
Ann Arbor.

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Bienvenue
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Study hard. Have fun. Look good.
CLINIOUF

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