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October 13, 1997 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1997-10-13

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4B - The Michigan Daily - SPORTSMonday - Monday, October 13, 1997

GAME STATISTIC

S Tuman rejoins passing attack after 3-
oi week wait; turf slippery as a wet rock

PASSING
Player
Griese
Totals

C-A
23-36
23-36

Yds
244
244

TD
2
2

RUSHING
Player Att
Howard 18
Floyd 7
C. Williams 7
Thomas 7
Griese 3
Totals 42
RECEIVING
Player No.
Tuman 5
Shaw 5
C. Williams 4
Streets 2
Thomas 2
Howard 2
Woodson 1
Campbell 1
Floyd 1
Totals 23
PUNTING
Player
Vinson
Totals

Yds
90
18
17
13
3
141
Yds
79
44
40
26
20
5
30
3
-3
244
No.
3
3.

A
5
2
T2
1
1
15
8
10
13
10
S 2
t30
-3
t-3
10
Yd
11t
11t

KICKOFF RETURNS
Player No. Yds
C. Williams 2 38
Schanski 1 15
Totals 3 53
PUNT RETURNS
Player No. Yds

1I
1!
' 1'

vg L9
.W 30
.6 7
.4 8
.9 7
.0 8
.4 30
vg Lg
.8 37
.8 12
.0 16
.0 22
.0 11
.5 7
.0 30
.0 3
.o 0
.6 37
s Avg
0 36.7
0 36.7
Avg Lg
.9.0 26
.5.0 15
.7.7 26
Avg Lg
8.0 8
8.0 8
Asst T
3
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

TD
0
0
0
0
0
0
TD
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
Lg
42
42
TD
0
0
0
TD
0
0
rot
11
6
5
4
4
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

By Alan Goldenbach
Daily Sports Editor
After a three-week absence from
the focus of Michigan's passing
attack, tight end Jerame Tuman ate
up Northwestern's pass coverage,
catching five balls for 79 yards and
both of Michigan's touchdowns.
In Michigan's season-opener
against Colorado, Tuman snared five
passes for 126 yards, giving hints
that the 250-pound junior would be
quarterback Brian Griese's prefered
target.
But in the three subsequent
games, Griese hit Tuman only once
each game as the offense focused
more on short passes to running
backs.
"I can't explain it," said Tuman
about his receiving renaissance.
"Every week, we're all in the game
plan. It's just a matter of what the
other team wants to give us."
The other teams in past weeks
have been trying to pressure Griese,
which forces him to look short. The
blitzing linebackers leave the run-
ning backs wide open for dump-off
passes.
When that happened, Tuman
turned his attention to blocking.
"I did what I was supposed to do
for this offense," Tuman said. "As
long as the plays are being made,
I'm happy. We got a lot of guys who
can make plays, and that makes it
easier on the individuals."
"My main thing is that this
offense is productive."
Tuman's 13 catches are fourth on
Michigan and his 249 receiving yard
leads the team. Clarence Williams

i

very poor shape. We had guys
falling down from the first play.
"I don't know what could have
happened that it would be in as bad
condition as it was after having great
weather."
Several plays early in the game
showed that many Michigan players
were having trouble keeping their
footing.
Williams slipped just as it seemed
he was breaking a kickoff return, Tai
Streets fell down as a Griese pass
sailed over his head and Charles
Woodson's feet came out from under
him as he was fielding a punt, and
luckily for him, missed touching the
ball. The ball still took a
Northwestern bounce and ended up
being a 71-yard punt.
"The turf was real slippery out
there," Woodson said. "I tried to
make a play on a punt. I probably
could have gotten to it, but I chose
not to reach for it. Then I slipped

paces the Wolverines with 17 recep-
tions.
WHOOPS!: Michigan's toughest
opponent yesterday may not have
been Northwestern but the sod at
Michigan Stadium, which was
unusually slippery.
"How that turf ended up as slip-
-y - pery as it was, I

don't know,
because we
haven't had any
rain," Michigan
coach Lloyd Carr
said. "I want to
find out what hap-
pened, because
that turf was in

once I tried to get back to the ball."
BooM!: Backup quarterback Tom
Brady underwent an emergency
appendectomy Thursday afternoon
after his appendix burst.
"(He) got up at four in the morn-
ing and went to the hospital, but he
went to the main entrance, and they
were closed, Carr said. "So Brady
went back home."
Later in the day, after a brutal
night of sleep, Brady went to prac-
tice, and as the pain lingered, he
wound up back at the hospital.
But miraculously, Scott Dreisbach
recovered from a season-long wrist
injury on his throwing hand just in
time to fill in as Griese's backup for
Saturday's game.
"Scott was ready to go," Carr said.
"He came to see me Wednesday
before practice and said, 'Coach, I
want you to know my wrist is fine.
I'm ready to go.' That's good news
for us."
Brady is the second Wolverine to
undergo an appendectomy this year.
Last spring, tackle Jeff Backus faced
a similar injury that he put off long
enough that it almost turned fatal.
The junior quarterback wasn't the
only Wolverine hit with the injury
bug this weekend.
Fullback Chris Floyd limped off
the field a couple of times during
the game with an apparent leg
injury. Cornerback Andre Weathers
injured his right shoulder on the
game's opening drive while making
a tackle.
Right guard Chris Ziemann sat out
the game with an elbow injury that
he sustained against Indiana last

Woodson
Totals

1
1

8
8

DEFENSE
Player
Jones
Ray
J. Williams
Sword
Renes
Taylor
Woodson
Peterson
Wilson
Hall
Washington
Jackson
Steele
Frysinger
Feazell
Whitley
Patmon
Copenhaver
Hendricks
Weathers

Solo
8
6
4
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
.1
1
0

CNEROUNDUP
Enis runs Penn State over Bucks;
Spartans' Irvin not far behind

PASS DEFENSE
Player Int Yds
Woodson 1 2
Whitley 0 0
Hendricks 0 0
Totals 1 2

Lg
2
0
0
2

Team Stats Mich
First Downs 20
Rushes/Yards 42/141
Passing Yards 244
Offensive Plays 78
Total Offense 385
Return Yards 61

Brk-up TD
0 0
2 0
1 0
3 0
NU
10
30/35
135
52
170
108

Comp/Att/Int 23/36/016/22/1

Punts/Avg 3/36.7
Fumbles/Lost 2/2
Penalties/Yards 7/62
Time of Poss 32:35
MICHIGAN SCHEDULE
Sept. 13 COLORADO
Sept. 20 BAYLOR
Sept. 27 NOTRE DAME
Oct. 4 Indiana
Oct. 11 N'WESTERN
Oct. 18 IOWA
Oct. 25 Michigan St.J
Nov. 1 MINNESOTA
Nov. 8 Penn State
Nov. 15 Wisconsin
Nov. 22 OHIO STATE

4/44.3
1/1
9/61
27:25

W 27-3
W 38-3
W21-14
W 37-0
W 23-6
12:30 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
TBA
TBA
TBA
noon

By Nicholas J. Cotonlka
Daily Sports Editor
STATE COLLEGE - As running
back Curtis Enis cut through the line on
his way to the end zone Saturday, he cut
through doubt and pain, too. His fourth-
quarter touchdown gave No.2 Penn State
a 31-27 victory over No. 7 Ohio State,
providing his previously untested team
with the performance it needed to be a
national title contender and providing
himself with redemption.
Ems became the first player in 17
games to run for more than 100 yards
against Ohio State, gaining 211 yards on
23 carries before a record crowd of
97,282 at Beaver Stadium. Penn State
coach Joe Paterno said Tuesday that this
game -not the rankings - would indi-
cate whether the Nittany Lions (2-0 Big
Ten, 5-0 overall) were for real, but to
Enis, it was more than that. It was per-
sonal.
A native of Union City, Ohio, and the
winner of Ohio's 1993 Mr. Football
Award, Enis was taunted after he ran for
34 yards on 11 carries in the Lions' 38-7
loss to the Buckeyes last year at Ohio
Stadium. One taunt, however, haunted
him more than most. A letter from a
Buckeyes fan said: "We didn't want you
at Ohio State, anyway."
Enis, burning inside, kept that letter --
only to rip it up before Saturday's game.
And after he helped the Lions back from
a 10-point second-half deficit and made
up for his fumble in the third quarter, Enis
choked back tears.
"We just proved to people in college
football," Enis began as his voice faded
into soft sobs, "that we have a great foot-
ball team. Down by 10 in that huddle, we
talked about how hard we worked this
summer and about how we got embar-
rassed by them last year. We weren't
about to let that happen in our place. We

said, 'Let's get it done."'
They did, though nothing seemed cer-
tain at the time. The Lions took an uneasy
17-13 halftime lead over the Buckeyes
(1-1, 5-1), who threatened to take the lead
themselves or tie on several occasions.
Penn State could have had its lead
reduced to one, but Dan Stultz missed a
27-yard field goal with three seconds to
go in the half
In the third quarter, the Buckeyes
broke through and went ahead, 27-17. A
three-play drive that featured a reverse
and a flea-flicker culminated in a one-
yard touchdown pass from Joe Germaine
to David Boston with 7:17 to go, and
Pepe Pearson scored on an eight-yard run
with 1:42 remaining in the quarter.
The trick plays "were way over there,
and I was over here; Paterno laughed. "I
said, 'What the hell are they doing?"'
What they were doing was throwing all
over the Lions. The Buckeyes' running
game, which produced just 106 yards,
was sputtering. So they replaced scram-
bling starting quarterback Stanley
Jackson with Germaine, who completed
29 of 43 passes for 378 yards and two
touchdowns. His favorite targets were
Boston, who had 14 receptions for 153
yards and a touchdown, and Dee Miller,
who had eight receptions for 149 yards
and a touchdown.
The Lions' offense, meanwhile, was
ranked second in the nation entering the
game and first in the Big Ten in passing.
But quarterback Mike McQueary was 7-
of-15 for 68 yards at halftime and fin-
ished 14-of-30 for 129 yards. Joe
Jurevicius, the league's leading receiver,
only caught five balls for 59 yards. .
. That left the running game, which
faced the sizable obstacle of star Ohio
State linebacker Andy Katzenmoyer. A
week before, he and the Buckeyes'
defense limited Iowa's Tavian Banks,

then the nation's leading rusher, to 84
yards. But "we weren't about to let a one-
man defense change our plans," said
Enis, who struggled in the first half, with
62 yards rushing on nine carries.
MICHIGAN STATE 38, INDIANA 6
Michigan State's Sedrick Irvin rushed
for a career-high 178 yards and two
touchdowns and returned a punt 80 yards
for a score as the 11th-ranked Spartans
beat Indiana, 38-6, Saturday.
"Last year, I was a baby trying to
crawl," said Irvin, who totaled 306 yards
in rushing, receptions and returns. "This
year, I learned from the mistakes and the
things that I didn't know last year. So now
I'm beginning to walk."
Michigan State (2-0,5-0), offto its best
start since 1966, added a 27-yard touch-
down pass from Todd Schultz to Gari
Scott late in the third quarter for a 24-6
lead. Indiana (0-3, 1-5) had to punt on the
next possession, and Irvin broke through
for the 80-yard return.
WIScONsIN 31, ILLINOIS 7
Ron Dayne ran for 207 yards and two
touchdowns against winless Illinois (0-3,
0-6) as Wisconsin (3-0, 6-1) extended its
winning streak to six games with a 31-7
victory.
Dayne, who needed a walking boot for
his swollen left ankle last week, scored on
a 1-yard run and a 66-yard scamper at
rain-drenched Camp Randall Stadium.
PURDUE 59, MNNESOTA 43
Billy Dicken tied a school record with
five touchdown passes, one more than his
total from the previous three seasons, and
ran for a score to lead Purdue to a wild
59-43 victory over Minnesota (0-2, 2-4).
Brian Alford caught TD passes of 93
and 89 yards on the way to a school-
record 215 yards, and Edwin Watson
addedthreeTDs as Purdue (2-0,4-1)won
its fourth straight, the longest streak since
the 1980 team won six straight.

HOME GAMES IN CAPS

Scoring summary
First Quarter
NU - Gowins, 52-yard field goal,
6:21
Second Quarter
Mich - Baker, 19-yard field goal,
13:25
Mich - Baker, 23-yard field goal,
10:02
Mich - Tuman, 10-yard pass from
Griese (Baker kick), 1:02
Third Quarter
NU - Gowins, 42-yard field goal,
11:03

Griese was
smacked, bu
Continued from Page 1B tthe second
time, Russell Shaw just coughed up the ball.
Three times in the fourth quarter against Notre
Dame the Wolverines fumbled the ball in their own
end of the field. And three times the defense came
to the offense's rescue. holding the Irish scoreless

They've only allowed two touchdowns all year.
Both of Northwestern's scores were pretty weak
- a 52-yard field goal from Brian Gowins and a
42-yarder that clanged off the post before it went
in.
For the second straight game, Michigan's oppo-
nent had negative rushing yards in the first half.
Northwestern didn't fare much better in the second,

of the responsibility for winning games.
Griese certainly isn't the problem. The fifth-year
senior turned in another fine performance Saturday,
completing 23 of 36 passes for 244 yards, two
touchdowns and no interceptions. But Michigan
can't seem to shake off its penchant for stupid
penalties and turnovers that may prove costly when
the big boys start rolling into town, starting with

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