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October 10, 1997 - Image 13

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The Michigan Daily, 1997-10-10

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 10, 1997 -13

The Matchups:
'Uncouth 'Cats don't
have winning look

Staff
Picks
- ail picks made
against the
spread.

* an O9nbmch
Daily Spots Editor
The first time, it was the law of aver-
ages manifesting itself. The second time,
it was just a stroke of luck.
- What would it be called then, if mighty
Michigan lost to questionably clad
Northwestern for the third year in a row?
Cataclysmic? At least for Ann Arbor
folk.
That label would be even more appro-
jrite this season since the talent dispari-
between these two teams is greater
in recent years. Whether people
ant to believe it or not, the Wildcats had
the personnel on the field and the coach-
'- that proved that they were one of the
nation's top 10 or 15 teams.
But now all that remains, more or less,
from those back-to-back conference
champion teams is the coaching. And
unless Gary Barnett shows he can run the
40 in 4.2 seconds and has eligibility
remaining, Northwestern's surprising
erm of domination will come to an end.
MICHIGAN RUSHING OFFENSE VS.
NORTHWESTERN RUSHING DEFENSE: The
Wildcats didn't rise to national promi-
nence behind a strong defense. In fact, if
there has been one aspect of their game
that has prevented them from really step-
ping into the nation's super-elite teams, it
has been their inability to stop the run.
Even with two-time Big Ten Defensive
Player of the Year Pat Fitzgerald anchor-
'ing the Northwestern front seven, the
W ildcats still allowed almost 140 yards
per game on the ground.
Now - with the departure of
Fitzgerald, fellow linebacker Tim Scharf
and nose tackle Matt Rice-- that number
has jumped to 205 yards per game.
How compatible. Behind Chris
Howard. Anthony Thomas, Clarence

Williams and Chris Floyd, Michigan is
averaging 201 yards rushing per game.
The numbers should play out just fine for
Michigan.
EDGE: Michigan
MICHIGAN PASSING OFFENSE VS.
NORTHWESTERN PASSING DEFENSE: If the
Wildcats' defense has a strong suit, it is
its secondary, spearheaded by a pair of
safeties, Eric Collier and Mike Nelson,
who are as good as any in the Big Ten.
But going over the middle has not been
characteristic of Michigan's passing
attack the past few weeks, especially
against Indiana, when quarterback Brian
Griese turned dump-off passes to his
backs in the flat into 20-yard gains.
There's no reason why Michigan
would turn away from that approach,
considering Northwestern's defense, like
Indiana's, tends to over-pursue, which
often leaves the backs wide open.
EDGE: Michigan

Game (HOME TEAM IN CAPS)
MICHIGAN (-24) vs. Northwestern
Michigan State (-18 1/2) vs. INDIANA
PENN STATE (-6 1/2) vs. Ohio State
WISCONSIN (-13) vs. Illinois
Purdue (-6) vs. MINNESOTA
ARIZONA ST. (-2 1/2) vs. Southern Cal
CLEMSON (-5 1/2) vs. Virginia
Colorado (-3) vs. OKLAHOMA STATE
Florida (-15 1/2) vs. LOUISIANA STATE
TENNESSEE (-10) vs. Georgia
Best Bet
Last week
Overall
Overall best bet

NICHOLAS J.
COTSONIKA
Northwestern
Michigan State
Penn State'
Wisconsin
Purdue
Arizona St.
Clemson
Colorado
Louisiana State
Tennessee
Colorado
6-4
31-27

ALAN
GOLDENBACH
Northwestern
Michigan State
Ohio State
Wisconsin
Purdue
Arizona St.
Clemson
Oklahoma State
Florida
Tennessee
Michigan State
5-5
25-33
2-3

DANIELLE
RUMORE

LEROI

Michigan
Michigan State
Penn State
Wisconsin
Purdue
Arizona St.
Clemson
Oklahoma State
- Florida
Tennessee
Tennessee
4-6
29-29
1-4

Nor thwester n
Michigan State
Penn State
Wisconsin
Purdue
Southern Cal
Clemson
Colorado
Florida
Tennessee
Clemson
7-3
26-32
1-4

As Colorado's Herchell Troutman and
Notre Dame's Autry Denson will attest, a
good resume is merely a good starting
point against Michigan's front seven and
nothing else. The Wolverines held both to
less than 3.5 yards per carry and weren't
the least bit intimidated by their usually
overpowering offensive lines.
Northwestern's line, contrary to its
nickname, isn't very wild nor very good
for that matter. Indiana's De'Wayne
Hogan will get some company in those
whose confidence has been destroyed by
a Michigan run defense that has proven
its preseason critics wrong.
EDGE: Michigan
NORTHWESTERN PASSING OFFENSE VS.
Mf ic-1G NN PVSIsIG OFFENSE:

Northwestern quarterback Tim Hughes
should be seeing a lot of Michigan all-
everything Charles Woodson.
Not because Michigan has some secret
corner blitz attack planned, but because
Hughes is also the Wildcats' punter and
should be sending a bunch of kicks
Woodson's way.
Northwestern's passing game has sur-
prised many in light of the loss of quar-
terback Steve Schnur to graduation and
receiver D'Wayne Bates to season-end-
ing knee injury in the preseason.
Receiver Brian Musso has picked up
Bates' slack and has proceeded to catch
34 passes, the most in the Big Ten.
But after Musso, Hughes' options are
limited, meaning that as long as
Michigan sticks Woodson on Musso.
Hughes will either become much more
acquainted with his other receivers or his
long snapper's rear end, which he'll see
virtually every fourth down.

EDGE: Michigan
SPECIAL TEAMS: Northwestern kicker
Brian Gowins earned All-Big Ten honors
last season and seems to be on his way to
repeating this year. At a time where relia-
bility is paramount among kickers,
Gowins has been just that, connecting on
12 of 16 attempts this season.
But let's not forget about how far the
Michigan kicking game has come since
the beginning of the season. Kraig Baker
has overcome early-season jitters and has
settled into his role; Jay Feely has been
almost automatic in getting touchbacks
on kickoffs; and Jason Vinson has given
everyone in Ann Arbor reason to believe
that walk-ons are not bottom-of-the-bar-
rel kids looking to get a cool unifornn.

Vinson better get off some good k ich
because Musso. the \Vildeats' return
man. is averaging almost 13 yards each
time he brings one back.
ED(i: Even
EVEN
They said it couldn't be done the first
time when the men in purple pants
waltzed into Michigan Stadium with
nothing to lose. They laughed when the
proposal came up again the following
year with Michigan holding a 16-point
fourth-quarter lead. Barnett, though, 1
such a great coach that he alters the view
of this game from an automatic Michigan
victory to one Northwestern could steal
Start doing those wind sprints, Garn
because it isn't looking good for you oth-
erwise:
Michigan 30, Northwestern 10

NORTHWESTERN RUSHING OFFENSE
vS. MICHIGAN RUSHING DEFENSE: Unlike
Michigan's diversified backfield attack,
in which any one of four backs could go
for 100 yards, Northwestern puts all of its
eggs in senior Adrian Autry's basket.
Not related to former Wildcats All-
American Darnell Autry. Adrian has
turned out performances similar to those
of his namesake, rushing past the century
mark in three ofhis past four games.

WILDCATS
Continued from Page 11
vated its field adding extra seats to
accommodate alumni. once ashamed
of the program. who now want a
piece of the action.
And what have the Wildcats done
on sparkling new Ryan Field -- for-
mery known as Dyche Stadium -
but disappoint their newly acquited
"faithful" and drop consecutive home
games to Rice and Wisconsin. Barnett
even conceded the Big Ten title after
only two conference games.
"The Rose Bowl is certainly out of
the question at this point." Barnett
said. "You have to adjust a little bit.
Rather than being down about it, we
have to take something away from
the" Wisconsin game last week.
Barnett knew the Wildcats' offense
wouldn't be anywhere near as potent

as last year's . he loss of Bates
made the situation even worse - but
Northwestern's defense was expected
to be solid. The Wildcats were
ranked in most preseason top 25
polls. Everyone in Evanston expect-
ed a bowl trip.
But Northwestern's performance
has been disappointing. 'Ihe loss to
lowly Rice Wias reminiscent of the
meek Northwestern teams of the
past. Barnett said the Wildcats had
lost their passion.
The loss to Wisconsin last week
was a heart-breaker a last-second
field goal from 45 yards did the dam-
age -- but Barnett said he saw some-
thing that had been absent in the three
weeks before. Unlike the debacle
against Rice, the Wildcats played
rather well, and they played with an
intensity that hadn't been seen since
last season.

"We were more disappointed in the
games that we won," defensive end
Casey Dailey said. "If we had played
the way we played against Wisconsin
the whole season, we'd be 6-0."
"I've never been around a team
that has lost that feels so good about
going to play the next game," Barnett
added.
"It's like we've bound ourselves.
and we're back to playing the way
that we have the last two years."
Now Northwestern enters a treach-
erous portion of the schedule that
starts with Michigan.
Barnett said the Wildcats are play-
ing better now than in those two ugly
loses, but even that might not be
enough.
Barnett said that this is the best
Michigan team he has seen since
entering the league five years ago,
and he's even comparing Michigan

quarterback Brain Griese's poise and
leadership to Schnur's.
Michigan is after the Big Ten title
that was once Northwestern's, and
while history is on his side, Barnett
knows that this year's game may not
end as well as before.
The Wildcats season certainly
won't be as successful. The Big Ten

champions of yestery eir may be
gone for quite some time
"That was a special group of kids,
but they had two years before they
really understood what it takes to
win the Big Ten title," Barnett said.
"Right now, we're playing kids who
watched those two seasons but di&n I
play a whole lot."

UNITED STUDE
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FEET- . Forei2
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2321 Jackson Ave.
Ann Arbor 48103

NT SPECIALS
Changes $17.95
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Serviced

FILE PHOTO
With receiver D'Wayne Bates out for
-the season, Northwestern's offense
has been stagnant at best.

S5}

(313) 665-7130

----------- "

Legendary coach hangs it up

The University of Michigan
Department of Recreational Sports
INTRAMURAL SPORTS PROGRAM

WHAT'S
HAPPENING

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) - He said he lost his enthusi-
asm for a game he has loved a lifetime, and loves still.
And in explaining it all, he lost his composure.
- Dean Smith retired as basketball coach at North Carolina
'esterday, a job that lasted 36 years; produced two national
itles and raised him to the pinnacle of his profession.
His longtime assistant Bill Guthridge takes over with little
time to waste: Practice for the upcoming season starts in nine
days.
The winningest college basketball coach of all time said he
was 80 percent sure last week he wanted to step down; after
the weekend, it was 100 percent.
"This timing is something I believed in all along," said
Smith, who broke Adolph Rupp's career victory mark of 876
last season during the NCAA tournament. "I certainly would-
't want to say I'll coach this year and resign after the season.
tan you imagine how many rocking chairs at different places
I would get and them all acting like they like you? I've seen
that all too often."
With students gathered outside, pressing against windows,
his North Carolina team entered a packed room of about 300
reporters, former players, faculty, staff and friends inside the
Smith Center (Dean Dome) just moments before the coach.
His players were somber, shocked that Smith had chosen to
retire so suddenly.
Smith appeared at ease as he began to address the crowd,
but began to cry when he talked about his players - all of
them.
"What loyalty I've had, from my players ...' Smith said,
wiping away tears, then dropping his head for several
moments while he tried to regain his composure.
"I knew some day this would be my last team. Yes, there is
guilt," Smith said. "I look at their faces and I just couldn't
dandle that. I couldn't if I turned right now. But I still believe

it's best for them unless I could give them what I want."
He couldn't really pin down major factors in his decision,
though he mentioned his 66-year-old body was out of shape
and overweight.
"I am going to try to exercise, and the doctor didn't tell me
to do that," Smith said. "But when you're nearing 200 pounds
at 5-10, it's time to do something."
Mostly he talked about knowing when to go.
Smith said he knew it was time to give it up when he saw
former Tar Heel Larry Brown coaching the Philadelphia
76ers at training camp in Chapel Hill.
"Larry Brown always fires me up, watching him out on the
court, the enthusiasm," Smith said. "I said, I used to be like
that and if I can't give this team that enthusiasm I said I would
give it up. That's honestly how I feel."
Chancellor Michael Hooker said he tried to talk Smith out
of his decision, but didn't press the coach.
"I didn't try as hard as I might have because I respect Dean
too much," he said. "He knows what he wants better than I
do, and it would have been selfish for the institution to
impose on him an obligation that is not appropriiate for the
circumstances."
With a career record of 879-254, Smith won national titles
in 1982 and 1993. His teams have finished in the top three of
the ACC for a record 33 straight seasons, including last sea-
son's second-place mark. He led the Tar Heels to an NCAA-
record 27 straight, 20-win seasons. Smith's only losing sea-
son came in his first, when the team was 8-9 in 1961-62.
On this day of fond farewells and tearful goodbyes, Smith
got a call from one of America's biggest college basketball
fans -- President Clinton.
"There is nobody like you," Clinton said. "But not just
because you won, but because of the way you did it. We all
respect and admire you so much."

PO WERBAR

CROSS COUNTRY
RUN
ENTRIES DUE:
Weds 10/15, 4:30 PM, IMSB
ENTRY FEE:
$25 per team
$5 per individual
RUN DATE:
Thurs 10/16
Mitchell Fields/Gallup Park

( ^"
V
5'.
4000000",

PRE-SEASON
FLAG FOOTBALL
ENTRIES TAKEN:
Mon 10/13 to Thurs 10/16
11:00 AM to 4:30 PM, IMSB
ENTRY FEE:
$30 per team
MANAGER'S MEETING:
MANDATORY
Thurs 10/16, 6:00 PM, IMSB
TOURNAMENT BEGINS
Sat 10/18, Mitchell Fields

_______________________________________________4

WALLYBALL

0.

ENTRIES TAKEN:
Monday 10/20 ONLY
11:00 AM to 5:30 PM
ENTRY FEE:
$35 per team
MANAGER'S MEETING:
MANDATORY
Weds 10/22, 7:15 PM, IMSB
PLAY BEGINS:
Thurs 10/23
IMSB

FLAG FOOTBALL
ENTRIES TAKEN:
Monday 10/20 ONLY
11:00 AM - 5:30PM, IMSB
ENTRY FEE:
$65 per team
MANAGER'S MEETING:
MANDATORY
Weds 10/22, 6 & 9 PM, IMSB
PLAY BEGINS:
Thurs 10/23
Mitchell Fields

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