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September 25, 1997 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1997-09-25

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12A - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 25, 1997

'M' golf battles Big Ten

By Rick Harpster
and Kevin Rosenfield
For the Daily
The Michigan men's golf team travels
to East Lansing this weekend for the
Northern Intercollegiate, a fall preview
of the Big Ten championships.
Competing on the par-72, 7,003-yard
Forest Akers West Golf Course,
Michigan will battle an 18-team field
that includes the entire Big Ten.
"It will be the first meaningful touma-
ment for us from the standpoint of dis-
trict play," Michigan coach Jim Carras
said. "This should be a good measuring
stick for what we can expect."
Aside from their conference competi-
tion, the Wolverines will get a preview
of another kind. The 1998 Big Ten
championships will be held on the same
course next May.
"We're a young, inexperienced team
with a lot of uncertainty," sophomore
Scott Hayes said. "But we've got a
chance this weekend to show that we can
compete in the Big Ten."
Two weeks ago in Minneapolis, the
Wolverines kicked off their season with
a ninth-place finish in the competitive
12-team ReliaStar Invitational.
"Based on how we played last time,

my expectations are higher than what
they were going into the ReliaStar,"
Carras said. "We showed that we have
the ability to get scores of around 294
and be competitive."
Although the Wolverines have one
tournament under their belt, they still
have some unanswered questions that
they hope to solve this weekend.
Finishing 15th overall in Minneapolis,
Kevin Vernick solidified his place beside
returnee Michael Harris as a team leader,
but the rest of the team remains unset-
tled. Carras emphasized that he plans to
use the upcoming tournament to name a'
permanent five-man varsity team.
"When we get back to Ann Arbor
Sunday night, we should know the five
guys who will represent us for the
remainder of the season," Carras said.
Fresh offtheir trip to Minnesota, Hams,
Vernick, Hayes and Keith Hinton will
again represent the Wolverines this week-
end. The lone change in the lineup is the
addition of Kevin Hinton, Keith's broth-
er, who replaces Kevin Harris.
"Kevin (Hinton) was within a couple
shots of going with us to Minnesota and
has really played well in practice recent-
ly," Carras said. "He has definitely
earned this opportunity."

Women's golf copes.
with growing pains

By David Stemr
For The Daily
Following a lackluster performance
in last weekend's Lady Northern
Intercollegiate Tournament at Penn.
State, the Michigan women's golf team
wll'try to bounce back this weekend
fwhen It hosts the Wolverine
Invitat(onal.
With five freshmen on its squad,
Michigan is struggling due to a lack of
experience. .
"I got a lot of experience in junior
golf, so I am used to the competition,"
freshman Trish Watkins said.
"However, a lot of the freshmen are
just starting to get oriented to the colle-
giate game."
One of the reasons that the freshmen
may be struggling is that they are get-
ting used to college life at the same
time they are trying to improve their
TO golf games. Watkins, for one, has had
d to deal with a lack of down time.
"There is no time for relaxation," she
said. "I'i etr iii class, studying, or
playing g vbody takes a real
beatingbut hin order to play
golf atthis le
After finisii4 a ppointig 14
out of1 i l last mong
the Big Ten sckVt Michiga will"
look for help frowrte f coursehey
know so well
"We should iveai l stipng tour-

FILE PHO
The Michigan men's golf team and the rest of the teams from the conference hea
to East Lansing this weekend for the Northern intercollegiate, a virtual preview of
the Big Ten championships.

nament because we have the advantage
of competing on a course that we play
on everyday," Watkins said.
This tournament is bigger than most
for the Wolverines because it is the*
only home meet of the year.
Michigan will look for help from
its top player, junior Sharon Park,
who has led the team in scoring in the
first two tournaments. The
Wolverines will also look for leader-
ship from their two seniors, Nicole
Green and Laura Hess.
If the Wolverines are to win their
first-ever Big Ten title, they are going
to have to improve a great deal. The
were beaten at last weekend's tourn
ment by 88 strokes at the hands of their
biggest rival, Ohio State. The closest
they came to any Big Ten school was
Illinois, which beat the Wolverines by
I I strokes.
While Michigan has struggled
early, it does have the advantage of
being such a young team. There is a
lot of room for improvement, and the
Wolverines just have to hope that t
freshmen will be ready to go whet
the Big Ten championship rolls
around in May.
The one great thing about young ath-
letes is that they have a short memory.
The young Wolverines will try and
make this statement come true this
weekend.
their three losses came against Ball State
and North Carolina - the same two
teams that handed Michigan its two loss
es.
Probably the most interesting aspect
of the match up will be that the game fea-
tures the Big Ten's leading scorers.
Michigan senior Julie Flaclis leads the
conference with 15 goals and 32 points.
Iowa junior Kerry Lessard is close
behind her with 12 goals and 26 points.
Northwestern will probably present
Michigan with much less of a challenge
but Michigan coach Marcia Pankra.
said the Wolverines have to work on
many dimensions of their game.
"Our game between the 25-yard mark
is outstanding," Pankratz said. "We are
just not finishing our plays and convert-
ing our penalty corners."

HAW
Continued rpt$I k
the defending 'i en champions in 31
meetings, include 14 in Ann Arbor.
But this yearis different. For the first
time since ti& NCAA recognized
women's tbletics in 1982, the
Hawkeyes(3-3) ,are not ranked in the
NCAA to2p., In c t, 4 w Big Ten
schools with fielA'hocke,6ograms,
Northwestern is the only der;xnked
team.
But Michigan knows that;Iowa will
come to play despite what ay poll says.
The Hawkeyesjhave only lost 19 match-
es in the conference history.
Both teams seem to be coming into the
game with the same momentum.
While Iowa, has a .500 record, two of

I

TISCH -
HUMANITIES SEMINAR 4
UNIVERSITY O F MICHIGAN
Thursday 25 September 1997

I

o'

The Future of the Humanities:
High Culture and Popular Culture
" Panel Discussion
" Rackham Amphitheatre -11:00 am
John D'Arms
President of the American Council of Learned Societies
Domna Stanton
Professor of Romance Languages and Women's Studies
Thomas Trautmann
Mary Fair Croushore Professor, Director of the Institute of the Humanities
and Professor of History and Anthropology
Tisch Hall Dedication
- between Angell Hall & Haven Hall - 12:30 pm
Reception follows Public welcome
Presented by College of Literature, Science & the Arts

iI,

4

Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Predoctoral Fellowships in
Biological Sciences
1998 Competition
80 fellowships will be awarded for full-time study toward the
Ph.D or Sc.D. degree in cell biology, genetics, immunology,
neuroscience, structural biology, epidemiology, or mathematical
biology.

Fellowship terms
" Three-year initial awards,
with two-year extension
possible
Eligibility
Less than one year of post-
baccalaureate graduate
study in biology:
college seniors;
first year graduate students;
M.D., D.O., D.D.S., D.V.M.,
students or professionals

$15,000 annual stipend
$15,000 annual cost-of-
education allowance

If an M.D./Ph.D. student:
not in a funded program
No citizenship requirements:
U.S. citizens may study
abroad;
others must study
in the United States

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n

Cr harinhs

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