100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 24, 1997 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Scoresc
MAJOR LEAGUE BaIrnore ,
BASEBALL TORONTO 2
DETROIT 6, Minnesct-a 5
Boston 0 C. WHITE SOX 3
Texas 14, A naheim at
OAKLAND 6 SEATTLE, ic.
MILWAUKEE 7. Atlanta 6.
Kansas City 4 PHILADELPHiA C
CLEVELAND 10. Florida 6,
N.Y. Yankees 9 MONTREAL 3

Pittsburgh 5,
N.Y. METS 4
HOUSTON 5,
C. Cubs 3
Cincinnati 8,
ST. LOUIS 6
San Francisco at
COLORADO, inc.
San Diego at
LOS ANGELES, inc.

NHL
PRESEASON
Detroit 3.
CAROLINA 0
Pittsburgh 5,
BOSTON 4
FLORIDA 6.
Tampa Bay 3
TORONTO 3.
Buffaio2 3

Wednesday
September 24, 1997

11

- -

Look out,
Bik Ten
lust myk t
IDon't everybody look at once,
cause the rest of the country
might catch us, but the Big Ten
looks like it just might be returning to
prominence as the nation's most domi-
t football conference.
It's early in the season, and polls
don't mean a whole heck of a lot right
now, but it is undeniable that the Big
Ten has found
the Lions' share
of early season
success.
Five Big Ten
teams are ranked
in the Associated
Press top 25
4 N (No.2 Penn
LROI State, No. 6
Michigan, No. 7
Out of Ohio State, No.
Bounds 1l Iowa and No.
12 Michigan
State) for the
fhr( time since hell froze over back in
'f3. 1873.
For the first time in about that long,
the Big Ten is scary. Aside from the top
*e teams, Purdue beat Notre Dame
(yeah, they lost to Toledo, too), Indiana
put a scare into North Carolina (though
Kentucky whipped 'em), and
Minnesota blew out Iowa State (OK,
that means very little).
The Big Ten will likely get six teams
into bowl games this year, and maybe
even seven, if Wisconsin and
Northwestern, both ranked at one time,
luve up to their ends of the bargain.
s for the top five, all look strong,
look invincible and all look poised
t4m ke a run at the Big Ten title, and
riaybe even a national championship.
This is great for the conference,
gobd for enthusiasm and for national
exposure" Michigan coach Lloyd Carr
sad. But we have to start playing each
ote pretty soon, so the likelihood that
we'll all stay highly ranked is pretty
low.
*'We have some great rivalries in this
conference, and it's going to be a battle
every week."
Carr is one who believes that the Big
Ten is always great - not just good -
it's just that teams are so competitive in
the Big Ten that they all beat each other
and only one squad emerges the confer-
ence season unscathed.
Obviously, some teams are going to
lose. Penn State, Ohio State and
Michigan won't all be undefeated at
1son's end - they have to play each
other. But that doesn't mean that two or
three Big Ten teams can't be ranked in
the top 10 in late November.
And unlike the past few seasons, Big
Ten teams look impressive - no,
astounding - on offense as well as on
the defensive side of the ball.
The Wolverines have pitched two
near shutouts and have scored 27 points
ore in both of their games. Penn
te is recording 50-point games like
Florida, and Iowa is truly giving the
Gators a run for their money, averaging
60 points per game.
Even Michigan State has contributed
to the cause, whipping Memphis and

Western Michigan, and when
Wisconsin's won it's won big.
"It's amazing to look at the stats
offensively in this league" first-year
See LEROI, Page 12

O

I

I

re'

In new-look league,
Michigan among
several young teams

WARREN ZINN/Daily
Not even Michigan's star goaltender, senior Marty Turco, can guarantee that the Wolverines can top the soaring Spartans.
For the past four years, Michigan has dominated the CCHA. The Wolverines won
17, -z-, ithe league title each of those years - three times outright. But now, with the
loss of nine seniors and an influx of freshmen, the coaches and the media predict
COL LEG IATE -
-that a new No. 1 team will take Michigan's crown this season. Here are ...
ThePolls

By Pranay Reddy
Daily Sports Writer
DETROIT - There was one underly-
ing theme during yesterday's CCHA
media conference at Joe Louis Arena -
youth will be served in 1997-98.
On a Michigan hockey team replacing
nine departed seniors with nine incom-
ing freshmen, inexperience is obviously
key. However, the Wolverines won't be
alone in the youth movement =
this season in the CCHA. Fast
Lake Superior coach Scott at i
Borek emphasized his team's W
relative inexperience yester- SfueWh
day but welcomed the chal- mae
lenge as well. The Lakers wiww (
field 10 freshmen on their e
roster. Arena
. "We will be extremely Tickets:
young and I'm certain we will salet $.
make a lot of mistakes" the $1
second-year coach said.
"We're very excited - I think the youth
and the enthusiasm that comes with
youth is always fun to coach."
And while the Lakers have their work
cut out for them, Northern Michigan
also seems to have its hands full in deal-
ing with inexperience. But coach Rick
Comley begs to differ.
"We will have 21 freshmen and
sophomores on our team, but that's
almost irrelevant," he said. "I think
today's good player plays whether he is a
freshman, sophomore or junior."
The Wildcats have issues other than
youth to deal with this season. Northern
Michigan is returning to the CCHA after
13 years in the WCHA, following its
first eight years in the CCHA.
"We're very pleased to be accepted
back in the CCHA for the upcoming sea-
son,' Comley said. "We are excited
about renewing past rivalries with the
members of the CCHA."
So aside from an experienced
Michigan State squad that returns 16 let-
terwinners, the rest of the conference
seems in limbo after four years of
Michigan dominance. The Wolverines
are in an unusual position to begin this
season. Michigan was voted No. 3 in the
CCHA coaches' pre-season poll.

In fact, the same could be said for
Michigan State. The Spartans were
voted as the No. I team in the confer-
ence in both the coaches' and media pre-
season polls. It was the first time since
the 1990-9! season that Michigan State
has earned the top spot.
While the Spartans captured nine
first-place votes in the coaches' poll,
Miami received the other two, ending up
at No. 2.
NOT SO FAST: A hot issue
rs discussed at the conference
annu~al was the recent trend of college
e scrim hockey players leaving early
to play in professional miner
r, 4 leagues. Both Michigan:
st Ice coach Red Berenson and
Bowling Green coach Buddy
qow on Powers raised the issue it
i dits, their statements to the medial
"Players are going to have
opportunities to move on, and
... you can't really hold them back,
Powers said. "Its something that might
even get worse as you have expansion in
the NHL. I certainly hope it doesn't
reach epidemic proportions.:
Berenson echoed his colleague's state-
ment and added his own anecdote about.
former Wolverine Harold Schock.
Schock began as a walk-on for the
Wolverines and played for four years
before graduating. And while he
attempts to join a professional team for.
the next two years, he also has made
plans to attend medical school. "That's
the kind of story people need to hear"
Berenson said. "Hopefully, there are a
lot of winners like Schock out there."
THANKS FOR THE MEMORIES: While
every CCHA coach spent time yesterday
discussing his respective team's
prospects for the upcoming season, no
one failed to thank CCHA commission-
er Bill Beagan for his accomplishments
over the past 12 seasons. Beagan, who is
retiring after this season, made huge
strides during his time as commissioner,
increasing publicity among other things.
In addition, Beagen led the efforts to
bring Alaska-Fairbanks, Notre Dame,
and now Northern Michigan into the
CCHA.

The
Rank
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
9.
11.

coaches'
Team (first-place votes)
Michigan State (9)
Miami (Ohio) (2)
Michigan
Lake Superior
Western Michigan
Bowling Green
Notre Dame
Ohio State
Ferris State
Northern Michigan
Alaska-Fairbanks

Points
99
90
83
69
62
54
43
42
26
26
11

The
Rank
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

media's
Team (first-place votes)
Michigan State (33)
Michigan (10)
Miami (Ohio) (3)
Lake Superior (1)
Bowling Green (1)
Western Michigan (1)
Ohio State
Notre Dame
Northern Michigan
Ferris State
Alaska-Fairbanks

Points
371
351
311
299
242
225
143
138
108
107
81

Upcoming games
Oct. 4
Blue-White Game, Yost Ice Arena
Guelph at Michigan State
Oct. 9
Western Ontario at Western Michigan
Oct. 10
Michigan vs. Minnesota, Hall of Fame Game, Minneapolis
Laurentian at Northern Michigan

Michigan State vs. Boston University, Dane County Col.
Toronto at Ohio State
Waterloo at Bowling Green
Western Ontario at Notre Dame
Oct. 11
Alberta at Alaska-Fairbanks
Bowling Green at Western Michigan (non-conference)
Michigan State vs. Clarkson/Wisconsin, Dane County Col.
Waterloo at Miami (Ohio)
Windsor at Ferris State

M' tennis s best struggle on clay

By Uma Subramanian
For the Daily
United they stand, divided they fal-
tered. This one statement describes the
results of Michigan men's tennis players
Brook Blain and Arvid Swan at the T.
Rowe Price National Indoor Clay Courts
tournament underway in Baltimore.
This past weekend was the qualifying
singles for this week's tournament. As
Swan expected, the tournament has been
challenging.
"This tourney will be competitive,"
Swan said prior to the tournament. "It's
one of the four major events of the year."
As it turned out, the singles qualifying
events proved to be a tough challenge.
Blain lost in the first round. But, accord-
ing to men's tennis coach Brian Eisner,
the match against Alex Cole of Farleigh
Dickinson was very competitive.
"Brook came very close;" Eisner said.
"He had several match points which did-

n't play out"
On the other hand, Swan experienced
success in the qualifying rounds on
Saturday. He defeated J.P. Gingras of St.
Bonaventure (3-6, 6-2, 6-0) in the first
round. In his second round match the
same day, Swan defeated Damion
Ciacca of East Tennessee State (6-2, 7-
5). Sunday dawned promising; however,
at the start of the match Swan experi-
enced several problems.
"He came out stiff" Eisner said. "This
often happens when you're not used to
clay courts. The points play longer, so it
wears you out more. Since he played two
matches the day before, he was stiff at
the start of the match. That was why he

didn't perform as well" Swan lost the
third match (6-2, 6-0) to Esteban Carril
of Texas Christian.
"Overall, Arvid felt very positive
about the matches," Eisner said.
"Though they. (Swan and Blain) were
disappointed they lost, they were very
glad they played in the singles qualifiers
because it gave them clay experience."
Clay is a tough surface for the
Wolverines to compete on. Since this is
the only tournament they play on the sur-
face, they do not have much experience
on it.
But, although they lost the singles
matches, Swan and Blain are still alive in
See TENNIS, Page 12

Q uestions about LSA Student Government?
Find out how LSA-SG can be a resource for you or your student group.
Come to the LSA Student Government mass meeting on
Tuesday, September 30 at 5:30 pm in room 2003 LSA
Building. Pizza and pop will be served.
Topics will include the budget
and appointment process.s.II/

Questions can also be answered at the
LSA-SG office at 4152 Michigan Union
or by phone at 647-8636.

1E \)7fr-AU
STu~t,7T O Vtfi7/ILII

TISCH
HUMANITIES SEMINAR .
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Thursday 25 September 1997

RESPONSIBILITY
CHALLENGE
AND
THE CHANCE
TO MAKE
A DIFFERENCE
ZS ASSOCIATES IS AN INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT CONSULTING
FIRM DEDICATED TO HELPING COMPANIES ACHIEVE LONG LASTING
COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE IN MARKETING AND SALES.
ZS WILL BE ON CAMPUS RECRUITING
Business Associates
Operations Research Analysts

WEDNESDAY

I

I

$1.00 Pitchers
$1.50 Well Drinks

Business Information Specialists
Software Developers

Iq - __ m_- -

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan