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December 10, 1997 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-12-10

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LOCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, December 10, 1997 - 5

I

Greek exec boards pass
the torch, set future goals
By Neal Lepsetz
Daily Staff Reporter "Right no we've taken the lead
Only one thing concerned
nesiology junior Bradley Holeman as nationally and are saying we're golr
repeated oath to become 1998
-ierfraternity Council President at the to regulato urs$ lve$,
Creek executive board installations last - Bradley Hol
night. interfraternity Council Pres
Holcman made sure he was prepared
for the toss of the gavel, an IFC tradi- al pins. saying we're going to regulat
tion indicating the transfer of power "I'm sad to be leaving because I'm a selves. And that's a step I don'
from the past president to his successor. senior and it signifies the end of my other Greek communities have to
According to tradition, dropping it fore- college career," said outgoing Holeman's other plans includ
warns bad luck for the coming term. Panhellenic Public Relations Chair gramming designed to get new
"Yesterday, I remembered last year Heather Sacks. bers more involved in the Greeks
y had the toss of the gavel," Panhellenic President Mary Gray and more active searches for
Holcman said. What worried him was said she felt her new board was suc- rather than just letting intereste
that past practice attempts with a fellow ceeding a highly successful one, citing dents approach current IFC men
IFC officer proved unsuccessful, as accomplishments a large rush term Black Greek Association Pr
Holcman said. "He ended up chucking philanthropy project, cracking down on Gerald Olivari claimed that one c
it at me and I was missing quite a bit." hazing and the recently drafted Bring- his new term revolves around b
-But Holeman came through in the Your-Own-Beverage policy. bonds among the members 1
clutch, catching the airborne gavel "This was a board that wasn't afraid retreats and solid leadership.
Without a bobble. to challenge the status quo," said "I think it's about marketin
Holcman then took his place among Panhellenic Adviser Mary Beth Seiler. group to the group," he said.
the rest of the newly inducted officers Holeman said the BYOB policy is a Through learning to build
?FC, the Panhellenic Association and step in the right direction, and he hopes to among one another, the memb
Black Greek Association as the introduce a similar draft on Jan. 14. He will be more willing to strive tow,
torch was passed at the Michigan said statistics prove that by students being second major goal - being mor
Union. responsible for their own beverages, they in community service, Olivari sa
"It's important that we acknowledge will be more likely to stop themselves "My theme for the term is acti
fhb service of the men and women," before they get drunk at parties. said. "I'm going to make sure
said IFC adviser John Mountz. "It'sjust going to be a more fun envi- forth a lot of programming a
As part of the event, previous officers ronment," Holcman said. "Right now, move forth to unify the Black
pinned their replacements with ceremoni- we've taken the lead nationally and are Association."

eCman
sident
e our-
t think
aken."
de pro-
mem-
system
recruits
ed stu-
nbers.
esident
goal for
uilding
though
ing the
d trust
bership
yard his
e active
aid.
on, he
we put
and we
Greek

MALLORY S.E. FLOYD/Daily
Dr. Richard Wahl, a professor of internal medicine and radiology at the University, stands next to a PET scanner.
Machines like this one may be useful in future cancer detection.
PET canseffctive 1in
the detection of- cancer

WI' study says job market
may remain friendlfor now

By Jeffrey Kosseff
Daily Staff Reporter
A report recently released by University researchers may
urage students to jump into the job market after gradua-
tJon.
Economics Prof. Saul Hymans and researchers Joan
Crary and Janet Wolfe compiled their quarterly forecast
on the U.S. economy, predicting continued moderate
growth.
* "There was stronger economic growth than we expected,"
said Crary, citing increased consumer spending on durable
goods and services.
The October stock market plunge, Crary said, did not have
agreat impact on the economy
"It doesn't look like it had a major effect," Crary said.
ost of the loss in the market has been regained. It doesn't
appear to have affected consumer confidence."
A healthy economy translates to a healthy job market, and
tije forecasters said they are confident that the economy will
continue to thrive.
"The economy has been growing very strongly," Wolfe
said. "There should be a solid job market."
Some career planning experts said they agree that the job
market is currently booming for University students.
"We are seeing a steady stream of interested employ-
," said Kerin Borland, senior associate director of the
fice of Career Planning and Placement. "A student
coming from the University stands to see a very lucra-
ti've job market."
But Borland said jobs are more available in technical fields
and less available in fields such as advertising.

"We are inundated with calls for computer science majors"
Borland said. "Regardless of the job market, students still
really need to tap every resource available to them to help
them find employment."
Students who plan to graduate in May say they are not wor-
ried about finding a job.
"There are a lot of opportunities out there for me," said
Engineering senior John O'Hara, who plans to graduate in
May. He said there are numerous options in electrical engi-
neering, the field he plans to pursue.
The economists predicted that the Federal Reserve Board
will soon raise the federal funds interest rate.
"We expect the Fed will raise interest rates because we
really need to slow down the economic growth," Crary said.
"We're growing faster than we can sustain."
The forecast predicts that unlike the past year, both infla-
tion and unemployment will creep up slightly.
"We still consider it to be healthy," Crary said. "We expect
continued growth. We assume that while inflation will
increase a bit, it will remain very well behaved."
The University has conducted the forecast since the '50s,
and Crary said the predictions are well respected throughout
the country.
"As far as these forecasts go, it is very accurate," Crary
said.
Wolfe, who has worked on the forecast for I1 years, said
the new information has changed some aspects of the report,
but the overall forecast has stayed the same.
"The method hasn't changed, but we are continually taking
into account new data," Wolfe said.

By Heather Wiggin
Daily Staff Reporter
A new avenue of cancer detection
was proven effective in two recent-
University studies. PET, or positron
emission tomography, is coming to the
forefront of medical imaging technol-
ogy and can locate cancer and infec-
tions, researchers say.
Although the images produced by
PET scans look similar to CAT, or
computerized axial tomography,
scans, a PET image shows tissue
metabolism and biochemistry.
"PET is type of CAT scanner that
makes pictures of the biochemistry of
tissues," said assistant Internal
Medicine Prof. Paul Shreve, one of the
studies' authors. In comparison, both
CAT scans and MRIs (magnetic reso-
nance images) show anatomy, or "if
there's a lump or a bump," Wahl said.
"PET is substantially better than
CAT to tell if (cancer) is spreading or
not," said Internal Medicine and
Radiology Prof. Richard Wahl, who
co-authored of the studies. "The major
clinical role is imaging cancer. ... To
treat malignancy, you have go to know
where the disease is located."
PET is especially useful in treating
breast, lung and colorectal cancers, as
well as lymphomas, melanomas and
other types of cancer.
"One thing PET does very well is to
tell if (the cancer) is localized or
spread around," Wahl said.

Researchers have also "accumulat-
ed enough data to prove that PET
scanning is useful in staging cancer,"
Shreve said.
Physicians stage cancer by estimat-
ing how far a malignancy has pro-
gressed. To make an accurate staging
diagnosis, images must show where and
how extensively a tumor has spread.
"Staging requires detecting small
pieces of tumor," Shreve said. "The
real power of PET is finding tumors
we can't see on a CAT scan."
CAT scans work well when viewing
large tumors, but smaller tumors may
go unnoticed, Shreve said.
"PET scanners have a much greater
ability to make good pictures," Shreve
said. "When it comes to a really small
tumor, that's when you need a good
PET camera."
Some companies sell dual-head
cameras, which are intended to be a
less-expensive alternative to PET. But
the images created by these cameras
are "much less clear," Shreve said..
"The practicing radiologists need to
know this, and patients do too."
Many of the companies that manu-
facture and distribute the lower-line
PET scans are "interested in profits,
not the big picture," Shreve said.
Shreve said it is necessary to test
new technology vigorously and said
he wants to see an end to the push of
"substandard medicine" on the public.
"The whole thing is being driven by

money issues," Shreve said. Hospital
administrators decide which pieces of
equipment to buy and from whom to
buy them, Shreve said.
"The bottom line is that you need a
good camera to take a good picture"
Wahl said. "A good camera costs more
money."
A PET scanner costs about $1 mil-
lion, but "if you (scan) a lot of patients,
it drives the cost down," Wahl said.
PET images are produced after
patients are injected with radiotracers,
which act like glucose. "Tumors use
sugar like crazy and light up on the
(PET) scan," Shreve said.
The radioactive tracers used with
PET have become less expensive and
more advanced in recent years. Their
short half-life and low dose of radiation
made them expensive in the past, Wahl
said, but new technology has improved
production and lowered cost.
"Knowing the correct diagnosis
leads to appropriate therapy,'Wahl said.
In addition, diagnosing a patient cor-
rectly can eliminate extra tests and treat-
ments to lower overall medical cost.
PET may also be helpful in quickly
diagnosing infections. It is not unusual
for a patient to arrive at the emergency
room with a high fever and severe type
of infection, Wahl said. PET has located
infections within an hour in University
studies, but Wahl said more studies must
be done in this area before it can become
a common diagnostic tool.

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