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December 09, 1997 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1997-12-09

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LOCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, December 9, 1997 -- 7

$ANGS
Continued from Page 1
Crime Prevention Office.
Patak said before the homicide occurred, law
enforcement officials did not focus very much
on gang activity. "There wasn't enough attention
paid to it because we didn't receive support from
the public," he said.
Since the Stewart slaying, sporadic shootings,
drug dealing activities, and home invasions have
9n linked to local gangs.
Ann Arbor Police Officer Alicia Green, who
conducts gang awareness workshops and tracks
gang intelligence in the city, said the local gangs
are not just copycats. "I would not classify them
as wannabes," she said.
Green said it is important to note that gang
activity has gone down in the last couple of
years. "Our gang activity has decreased signifi-
cantly since 1995," she said.
Gang awareness seminars aimed at residents,
oation programs geared toward middle
tool students, and efficient graffiti removal,
amobg other factors, have contributed to the
decrease in gang-related activity, Green said.
Many people differ in their assessment of the
seriousness of the gang problem.
"rom what I gather, lately there hasn't been a
lot of gang activity in the city;' Chenevert said.
A presence on campus
Law enforcement officials said gang activity
* nfined mostly to the outer areas of Ann
,r and does not affect campus very much.
Officer Benny Chenevert, DPS's gang liaison,
said The campus police have not had any run-ins
with-gang members since Sept. 1996, when DPS
officers identified gang members from the West
side pf Detroit attending a dance in the Michigan
Union.
"We don't see a lot of activity on campus,"
Chenevert said. "We occasionally will see some
graffiti on campus."
Chenevert said in August of this year, DPS
' cials spotted the initials "LK8" on a stop
sign at Beal and Plymouth Roads. The initials
"LKS" are believed to represent the Latin Kings,
he said.
LSA sophomore Jennifer Meder said she
"never would have thought" that much of the
graffiti on walls and buildings around campus

can be attributed to gangs.
Chenevert said two areas near campus that
frequently get tagged with gang graffiti are the
walls of Fingerly Lumber, located on the corner
of Madison and Fourth Streets near the train
tracks, and the pedestrian tunnel next to the
Michigan Theatre on Liberty Street.
AAPD officials say they have had several run-
ins with gang members on South University
Avenue. Security guards who patrol South
University said the street has become a popular
meeting place for some who claim gang mem-
bership. "It's been getting out of control around
here," said a security guard from Great Northern
Security Company. "In the last year, (gang activ-
ity) has increased quite heavily."
"We've had knives (spotted), we've had stab-
bings, we've had people assaulted with pool
cues," said another security guard.
The first security guard said that many of the
youth hanging out along South University may
be copying others. "We have a lot of wannabes.
We also have a lot of youth who have been in
trouble with the law, but they're not necessarily
gang members,'he said.
Leon Bing, author of the 1991 book "Do or
Die;' which explores gang life in Los Angeles,
said that although youth often try to emulate
what appears to be glamorous forms of gang life
portrayed in movies and the media, there is not
much that separates a wannabe gang member
from a true gang member. "Gangs are the real
deal,' Bing said. "That's what the movies are
made about. ... A wannabe is what it is, a
wannabe. But it doesn't take much to push a
wannabe over the edge;' she said.
Bing noted that wannabe gang members often
throw signs to represent the gang they belong to.
In fact, other gang members may take their
actions more seriously than the wannabe gang
members believe.
"If they throw it at the wrong person, they can
get killed for their trouble," Bing said.
Gangs here?
When gangs first begin to establish a presence
in a new geographic area, residents of the com-
munity often do not want to believe that the
gangs are present, said Mary Lou Antieau, judi-
cial code adviser in the University's Office of
Conflict Resolution. "Most communities' initial
reaction to gang activity in their community is

denial," she said.
The University community is no different.
Until several gang education seminars were
held last year for Ann Arbor residents and mem-
bers of the University community, many did not
realize that gang activity was taking place in the
area, Antieau said.
The Gang Violence Seminars, led by a subur-
ban gang expert from the Madison Heights
police department, focused on the emergence of
gangs in suburbia and addressed various issues
such as the posture, hand signals, clothing, and
colors that can sometimes identify gang mem-
bers.
Universities often can seem like they have a
"glass bubble" of safety surrounding them,
Antieau said. She said that when she contacted
other universities to find out if they had gang
policies, "they said everything from 'no we
don't,' to 'huh?"'
Some students said the University's "safe"
image is not one they usually connect with
gang activity. "I guess I just write off Ann
Arbor as being this safe microcosm - we live
in sort of this fantasy world," said LSA senior
Eve Madison. "I guess gangs are the farthest
things I would think of when I think of Ann
Arbor."
Crips, Bloods and Ann Arbor
One 26-year-old Ypsilanti resident said he has
seen gang activity spread to the southern
Ypsilanti area, where he lives, and also to the
southern Ann Arbor area. The man said police
have labeled him as a Blood gang member,
although he is not affiliated with the gang.
The man said the gangs in the southern Ann
Arbor/Ypsilanti region are not as menacing as
they seem, and that the dynamics of the gang sit-
uation have changed since an Oct. 15 gang
sweep law was enacted in Ypsilanti's West
Willow neighborhood. The sweep was made by
the Gang Crimes Attack Team, a coalition of
local and federal law enforcement agents estab-
lished in 1995.
"The gangs around here are not hardly as dan-
gerous as they seem to be," the man said. "It died
down a lot because a lot of the troublemakers are
in jail."
The man said that many kids in the southern
Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti area wear gang colors and
claim gang affiliation, but the gangs do not hold

initiations in the way that serious gangs do. He
said many kids may wear a certain color because
they don't want to be the only person in their
neighborhood not wearing that color.
Likewise, the young people may claim affili-
ation to a certain set, or gang, that is part of a
larger umbrella group because that is the gang
affiliated with their street or block.
"Like if you live in Ann Arbor. you'd say
you're either a Folk or a Crip," the man said.
"The Folks and the Crips, I think they have a
whole lot of different sets."
Gang experts say that most gangs fall under
either the Folk Nation or People Nation
umbrella groups. Gangs that are affiliated with
the Folk nation are usually Crip sets; gangs in
the People nation are usually Blood sets. Blood
gangs often associate themselves with the color
red, while many Crip gang members choose to
wear blue.
The Ypsilanti man said that a blue hat tipped
to the right sometimes symbolizes membership
to a Crip set, and a red hat tipped to the left can
signify membership to a Blood set.
Nineteen-year-old Ann Arbor resident Krsna,
who did not want to give his last name, said that
members of Blood gangs sometimes choose to
hang out along South University. "There's real
Bloods that come here from Ypsi once in a
while," he said.
Krsna said that whenever the "fake Crips from
Ypsi" see a real Blood, they scatter quickly.
The man said some gangs have established a
presence in southeast Ann Arbor. "Hikone and
Platt Roads are definitely the only places (where
there are) one or two real Crips who know any-
thing about the scriptures," Krsna said, referring
to a list of rules that members of Crip sets adhere
to.
'It's difficult to get out'
Antieau said gang presence is not limited to
local youth who hang out on campus. "I think a
lot of students at the University would be sur-
prised that there are members of gangs attending
the University, she said.
The gang members who have attended the
University in the past have not let gang affilia-
tions interfere with University life, Antieau said.
"There have been gang members who have gone
through their entire University life without call-
ing attention to themselves in any way;'she said.

"If that pattern continues, i don't hav e a con-
cern.
Antieau said lth+t despite the vast opportuni-
ties available to students at the University, afew
students may prefer to remain as gang members
because "they come here as gang members."
Antieau said she has heard o f students at other
universit ies x ho were able to at tend college
because their gang paid the tuition costs. "Once
you have been in a gang and participated in ille-
gal activity, it's very, very difficult to get out,"
she said.
Conditions at the University could potentially
worsen, Anticau said, if members of rival gangs
begin attending the University and begin claim-
ing different parts of campus as territory. "If
they come, and if there's violence and territorial
fights as a result, then I'm going to be concerned
because that would be a threat to campus safety:',
she said.
Antieau said she has been toying with an
early draft of a University policy on gangs, and
hopes to get feedback from other college
administrators at the Association of Student
Judicial Advisors' national conference in
February.
'Mythical beasts'
Martin Gold, a research scientist at the
Institute for Social Research, said it is important
to stress the difference between young people
who hang around in groups and commit delin-
quent acts and organized gangs with histories
and affiliations.
"I have studied juvenile delinquency for many
years, and I've come to the conclusion that juve-
. nile gangs are like mythical beasts," he said.
Gold said that many young people who say
they belong to gangs are doing it simply to earn
"notoriety."
Gold said young people lack the social skills
necessary to keep a gang together for a long
time.
"The kids declare they're members of gangs,
they declare hand signals, they put graffiti up on
walls, and they become famous," he said. "But
most juveniles can't sustain anything like a gang
organization for very long"
"The word 'gang' conjures up an image of
long history and perseverance and power, which
is just what makes the kids feel great;' Gold
said.

ATTENTION WANTED 86 PEOPLE
We'llay you tolose up to 30lbs. in 30
days. Offer expires 11/30. 1-800-598-2671.
ATTENTION EDUCATION & child
development majors: Assistant needed in es-
tablisbed Ann Arbor child care center.
Afternoons. Top pay, experience preferred.
'Judy at 995-1001.
A AILABLE POSITIONS at the Saciety
for Research in Child Developmrent. Im-
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who possess: dependability, detail
orientation, excellent computer & keyboard-
ing abilities, strong communication skills-
both verbal & written, ability to work as part
of a team or be self directed. Will consider
temp hourly or work study. Call 998-7310.
Child Care Providers:
« Full-time
"Part-time
*Positions in private homes
t$7/hr. and up
Call Child Care Solutions
(313) 668-6882
Child care references required.
Will CPR train qualified applicants.
CUSTOMIZED HEALTH Customized
Wealth. 4 Real first 20 callers. 508-339-4784
or Ideal@ici.net
EARLY CHILDHOOD Substitutes needed.
H ire fun working with young children &
extra cash at the same time. Work ac-
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EARN $530} WEEKLY in our comn-
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EARN WHILE YOU LEARN
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ENTHUSIASTIC, FRIENDLY PEOPLE
needed for fast-paced, first class tanning
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GRADUATING SENIORS- Mackinac
Island's Murray Hotel needs year-round
manager. Live/work 6 months on Mackinac
Island and 6 months in Ann Arbor. Call: 1-
800-462-2546 or write: P.O. Box 7706, Ann
Arbor, MI 48107. Fax resume to: 313-665-
2644.
GREAT JOB @ $8/HOUR
Cushing-Malloy, Inc. Book Manufacturer is
accepting applications for full or part time
help to maintain a clean environment at our
production facilities. Some of the duties in-
clude sweeping, mopping, moving boxes of
recycled scrap paper and outdoor
maintenance. Must be able to easily lift up to
70 lbs.
Monday -Thursday
4:30 pm - 2:30am (flexible)
Smoke free environment
Close to campus
Aply in person at: CUSHING-MALLOY,
INC. 1350 N. Main Street, Arn Arbor, MI
48104. 663-8554. E.O.E.
GUEST SERVICES
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Students needed for a fun and rewarding job
at the front desk of a conference center at
UM Business School. The position offers
flexible scheduling, good pay, and a free
meal with each shift. Must have the following
ualifications: Excellent customer service
sklls, friendly & outgoing, familiar with
campus and the Ann Arbor area and
computer .skills. The position is available
now or winter semester. A ly in person at
Executive Residence, 710 Ea t University._
HANDYMAN/GARDEN HELPER. 6
hours per week. Own transportation. 668-
0281, 3-9 p.m.
HELP WANTED Drivers and cooks full and
part time. Ann Arbor Mr. Pizza. 1200
ackard. 995-4040. Eam $6-12/hr.
JOBS, JOBS, JOBS!
56.50+/hr. Create your own sched. Valuable
computer & comm. skills. Flexible hours &
fun atmosphere. Paid training.
For aplication & info stop by MI Telefund,
611 Church #304 or ca 1998-7420.

HOW DOES NICOTINE AFFECT YOUR
BRAIN?
Tobacco smokers needed for PET study of
nasal nicotine spray brain effects. Healthy
drug free males and females ages 18-45 will
be given a riori free medical workup and
later scheduled for a morning study after
overnight tobacco abstinence. A safe and
medically approved radioactive tracer will be
given by injection and by samples of blood
withdrawn. Call 647-8239. Leave your name
and telephone number, where you can be
reached, and when. Pay of $250 will be given
upon completion of the study.
MEIJER
Cashier positions available. Starting at $7.09
and up based on experience. Flexible shift
preference. **One hour study breaks**
Arrange groups to work the same schedule
for carpooling options! Other positions also
available. EOE
Immediate Interviews
3145 Ann Arbor-Saline Road
MUSIC INDUSTRY: booking agency seeks
interns. Call Jeremy at 313/995-5777 after 11
am..
NEED HELP WITH YARD work- moving
wood. $10/hr. Walk from campus. 971-3321.
NOTETAKERS NEEDED Immediate
openings. Seniors and grads. Attend class,
take notes. Earn up to $14/lecture. Variety of
classes, flexible schedule. Faculty approved
classes only. Apply at Grade A Notes, 549 E.
University Ave. Or call 741-9669 for more
info.
NOW HIRING!!
Female/ male dancers wanted for
adult internet service. GREAT PAY
Contact (810) 510-1552.
PART TIME OFFICE WORK for student
of civil engineering, cartography, or law. Set
your own schedule. Must be able to map and
locate properties for land title record system.
Knowledge of metes and bounds descnptions
preferred. Call Ronn at 663-9395.
POST-ACUTE BRAIN INJURY
PROGRAM has immediate openings for
direct care staff. $8.00/hr starting pay; more
depending on education and expenence. Earn
additional income and gain valuable hands-
on experience. Full, pert-time, and job shar-
ing positions availa le. A at 3200 E.
Eisenhower Parkway or call 313-677-0070.
POSTERER WANTED for local business.
Contact Maura at 662-3149.

RESEARCH INTERVIEWERS Full and
Part-time positions available immediately!
Nationally renowned public health research
firm is currently hiring telephone inter-
viewers for major health surveysI No ex-
perience necessary. Paid training. Set your
own schedule! Days, evenings, and
weekends available. Comfortable
atmosphere, free parking, learn computer
skills. $7.50-9.00/hr! Bonuses for full-time
and/or excellence. Call Eri or Carl at: (313)
994-0003. EQE
SERVICE REP NEEDED. Are you self
motivated & possess exc. communication
skills? Do you have an enthusiastic per-
sonality/attitude? Exc. compensation
package. Up to 30 hrs./wk. avail. Call Mike
or Brad 662-5485.
SPECIAL GIFT-We're looking for healthy
women between the ages 21-35 for egg
donation. All ethnic backgrounds are
encouraged. Fee paid. Send inquiries to
AARMA, P.O. Box 2674, Ann Arbor, MI
48106.
WORK STUDY: Psychology Peer
Advising: W'98 Up to 15 hrs./wk. Mornings
only. Call: Karen Petticrew 764-9179 or
email: petti@umich.edu
child care
ABLE CHILDCARE needed 10-15 hrs./wk.
After school & weekend eves. 6 & 9 yr. old
FUN, CREATIVE, responsible caregiver
needed for our 2.5 year old son in our Ann
Arbor home. One or two afternoons pr
week. (Mon., Tires., or Wed., 11:30 am -70
pm) Non-smoker. References and transpor-
tation required. Call 971-7982.
MOTHER'S HELPER wanted for care of
infant triplets. Full or part-time beginning
January. Infant care experience & references.
hA
$8/ou. :47-6945:!:.
$ $ $ AMAZING discounts on any flight!
Call anytime! 913-4616 Go Blue!
$ LOW FARES WORLDWIDE Instant
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- -
1111. .Y.,. t.
~WAIltFRE FAMILY
WHILE I ASK THIS ANMAL
FOR IRECTIONS.
'V
I
THE DEBATE ON WHETHER OR NOT CAR HIGH BEAMS ACTUALLY
FREEZE DEER IS STILL AN ON-6OING QUESTION...

-1
..
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,
C!
CC
C4

RESEARCH DATA COLLECTION &
PROCESSING
The University of Michigan, Survey
Research Center Survey Lab is now recrit-
in people with excellent communication
skills and interest/background in the social/
economic sciences to join a team collecting
national public opinion telephone interviews.
Candidates need to be highly self-directed
with a professional telephone manner for
conducting research interviews. Exprience
with IBM compatible computers helpful.
Keyboard/typing skills required. Must be
available to work 16-20 hours per week,
nearly exclusively evenings and weekends.
Competitive wages--starting at $9.50/br. At-
tendance required at training.
Apply in person,-weekdays 8:30 a.m. - 5:30
p.m., at the University of Michigan, Institute
for Social Research, Rm. 3350, 426
Thompson St., Ann Arbor, from 12/11/97
through 12/23/97. The University of
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ative Action employer.
SAVE $$5 ON:
* textbooks, supplies, U of M clothing, etc.
...while you make money. Flex. hrs., great
company. Apply in person at the Michigan
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SECURITY GUARDS to work on U of M
campus. A.ly at State Security Services,
525 Church St. 998-7201. E.O1.E.

**SPRING BREAK**..."take 2" Organize
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NEED PLACE TO STAY FOR ROSE
BOWL? Free in exchange for ticket! 310-
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ROMANTIC GETAWAY- Cozy log cabins
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more. Traverse City. 616/276-9502.
ROSE BOWL TICKETS
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SPRING BREAK '98 - Sell Trips, Eam
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ROOMMATE NEEDED FROM JAN. 1,
1998 to end of Aug. 1998 to share 2 bdmi. i
Highlands Apts. 10-15 min. walk from N.
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$330 + utilities/mo. Mark 662-6724.
f &n t
- ;

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