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December 04, 1997 - Image 16

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The Michigan Daily, 1997-12-04

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28 -The Michigan Dily Weeken ,Thur ecem*t 4, 1197

S.

The Michigan Daily WeekeniMagui

.,. !rS'!4i i i i i 1E'J }

International students face travel dilemma

By Joanne anbJar
For the Daily
While most University students are readjust-
ing to college life after Thanksgiving break,
some international students are still waiting to
see loved ones halfway around the world.
Being so far away from home is a challenge
for international students at the University.
Engineering sophomore Nishu Phukral, who is
from Kuwait, said, "It sucks that everyone gets
to go home for Thanksgiving, along with a lot
of in-staters who get to go home any weekend
they want during the semester, while I don't
even have the option to do that."
At this time of year, international students
face logistical difficulties in simply getting
home. Out-of-state students can shop for the
best transportation deals before they go home
- usually making direct trips without stops or
delays. But a slew of students coming from
around the world have another set of problems.
Connecting flights to foreign destinations
are not always available, and sometimes

require waiting in various foreign countries for
trips to get home. Some students, like Phukral,
mentioned the difficulty of finding flights with
these restrictions.
"My parents booked my flights home for
Christmas near the end of September because
connections to get home are really hard to
attain, especially because it's so busy during
the holidays," Phukral said.
Soumitra Ray, a first-year Engineering stu-
dent going to Singapore, explained other fac-
tors that caused problems booking flights
home. "I couldn't book my flight until I found
out when my last final was," Ray said. "As
soon as I did, I booked my flight to make sure
I could get back in time for school to start."
Northwest Airlines representative Tiffany
Tate said international travel brings up addition-
al problems for students. "The holiday season is
so busy that international travelers are advised
to get to the airport two to three hours in
advance in order to find parking, get through
security ... and additionally they must go

through questioning when leaving the country,
which takes a long time with the large amount
of travelers:'
Spending Thanksgiving vacation at home
was not an option for most international stu-
dents, but many found other things to do while
remaining in the United States.
Marina Siddiqi, a first-year Engineering stu-
dent from England, said, "I went to my uncle's
house in Farmington Hills for Thanksgiving. It
wasn't too difficult to be here without my fam-
ily because it's such a short period of time and
I'm still with family."
But some students have more time to wait
before going home. Siddiqi plans to remain in
Michigan until the end of June to attend spring
term classes. The last time she saw her family
was before she left for school in August.
"Christmas vacation will be hard, though,
because it's so long and almost no one will be
here at all" Siddiqi said. "I think I'm going to
miss my family and home back in England a
lot more."

THEATER
House Blend Series Staged readings of
works in progress by Ann Arbor playwrights.
Gypsy Cafe, 214 N. Fourth Ave. 7 p.m. 913-
9749.
Henry V See Thursday. 2 p.m.
No Exit See Thursday. 2 p.m.
Princess Ida See Thursday. 2 p.m.
Escanaba in Da Moonlight See Thursday. 2
p.m.
ALTERNATIVES
Geri Larkin Zen Buddhist speaker reading
from "Stumbling Toward Enlightenment."
Shaman Drum. 4 p.m. Free.
monday

ALTERNATIVES
Martin Lee Talking about his new book,
"The Beast Reawakens." Borders. 7:30 p.m.
Free.
tuesday
CAMPUS CINEMA
Citizen Kane (1941) Directed by, written by
and starring Orson Welles as a tragic newspa-
per tycoon. Mich. 11 a.m. & 4 p.m. Free.
Everyone Says I Love You (1996) Last
year's "as-yet-untitled film by Woody Allen."
Mich. 7 p.m.

CA

Gattaca (1997)

See Saturday. Mich. 9:15.

Engineering sophomore Nishu Phukral, like other intenational
students, has trouble getting home for the holidays.

CAMPUS CINEMA

Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982) Amy
Heckerling's quintessential 1980s high
school comedy. Mich. 4:10 p.m.
L.A. Confidential (1997) See Saturday.
Mich. 9:15 p.m.
MUSIC
Bird of Paradise Orchestra Perpetually wor-
thy big-band jazz. Bird of Paradise. $3. 9
p.m.-1 a.m.
University & Chamber Choirs Presenting the
music of Giovannelli, Stoltzer, Lauridsen,
Mendelssohn and Tavener. Hill Auditorium. 8
p.m. Free.

MUSIC
University Symphony & Philharmonia
Orchestras Showcasing the music of
Bellini, Puccini and others. Hill Auditorium.
8 p.m. Free admission.
Portishead Don't expect a happy show.
State Theatre, Detroit. (313) 961-5450.
THEATER
The Meaning of Life The University's ResRep
troupe writes and presents original plays that
confront social issues. Location TBA. 9 p.m.
Free admission. 769-0500 ext. 433.
ALTERNATIVES
Keith Taylor Ann Arbor poet reading from
"Adventures of a Bookseller Poet." Ann
Arbor District Library, 343 S. Fifth Ave.
12:10 p.m. Free.

Just Another
film set durir
Salvatore GIL
Francesco Rc
folk hero. Mi
Hands Over I
stars as a gL
the deadly c
building. Mic
Jan Krist Sir
sonal and or
ensemble. TI
Brother Rabi
before movir
1301 S. Uni)
University Sy
Faculty/stuc
plete music
Hill Auditoriu
The Harlem I
orchestra, g<
Power Centc
AL
Leslie A. Per
"Finding Tim
Individuals,
New Work P
Free.

I I =mw

first-run films

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Home Alone 3 The fun is back, minus the
Mac (sneak preview). At Briarwood: 4:00
(Saturday only).
films holding
Alien: Resurrection Ripley's back; believe
it, or not. At Briarwood: 1:30, 4:20, 7:20,
10:10; at Showcase: 11:00, 11:30, 1:30,
2:00, 4:00, 4:30, 7:15, 7:45, 9:45, 10:15,
12:10, 12:35.
Anastasia 20th Century Fox's holiday car-
toon musical entry. At Briarwood: 12:30,
2:45, 5:00, 7:15, 9:20; at Showcase:
11:45, 1:55, 4:00, 6:05, 9:00, 11:00.
Bean Rowan Atkinson brings his famous
persona to the big screen. At Briarwood:
12:40, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 9:30; at
Showcase: 12:45, 3:05.
Boogle Nights This sprawling epic about
the rise and fall of the 1970s porn film
industry featare&'M rky" .MarkWahlberg. A
At Ann Arbor 1 w& : 0, 4:001 T:00, 9:5.y

Eve's Bayou Samuel L. Jackson leads this
quaint Southern drama. At Showcase:
11:20, 1:50, 4:20, 7:00, 9:25, 11:50.
Flubber Robin Williams and Play-Doh - a
winning combination! At Briarwood: 12:50,
3:00, 5:15, 7:40, 9:45; at Showcase: 10:45,
11:15, 12:50, 1:20, 3:00, 3:30, 5:10, 5:40,
7:20, 7:50, 9:30, 10:00, 11:30, 12:00.
The Full Monty Down-and-out Brits show us
the monty! At State: 2:00, 4:00, 7:00, 9:00.
The Ice Storm A clever examination of life
in the 1970s. At Ann Arbor 1 & 2: 12:20,
2:35, 4:50, 7:20, 9:35.
I Know What You Did Last Summer A "Prom
Night" clone from the writer of "Scream." At
Showcase: 5:25, 7:55, 10:10, 12:20.
The Jackal Bruce Willis plays a notorious
international assassin. At Briarwood: 1:40,
4:30, 7:10, 9:50; at Showcase: 10:50,
1:40, 4:15, 7:10, 9:55, 12:25.
The Man Who Knew Too Little The latest
Bill Murray farce. At Briarwood: 4:10, 9:55.
Midnightin the Garden of Good and Evil -C int
Eastwood's adaptation of -thepopular nonfro&,

tion book. At
3:10, 4:35, (
Mortal Komi
Showcase: 1
10:05, 12:1!
The Rainmakl
Grisham thril
7:00, 10:00;
3:40, 4:40, E
Starship Troc
sci-fi warfare
at Showcase
The Wings c
Henry Jame:
4:30, 7:30,
Phone Numb
Briarwood: 4
Michigan Th
8380; State:
Showtimes a
Late shows a
Friday and Sc
matinees at )
Sunday and-
for Saturday

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