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December 03, 1997 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-12-03

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LoCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, December 3, 1997 -- 7

=tdents
ready for
holiday
shopping
y AiCe Robinson
Daily Staff Reporter
For many students, the holidays
bring family, friends -- and a lack of
funds.
But area businesses are hoping that
the upcoming month brings more shop-
pers and more profits.
"I love them," said Briarwood Mall's
eral Manager Ted Schwarz, of con-
ners who start off the holiday season
each year by arriving at the mall the day
after Thanksgiving.
Schwarz said the holiday season is an
incredibly lucrative time for retail
stores.y
"We-do probably close to 30 percent
.-of the business in a couple of months,
for the whole year," he said.
An additional factor that may
Y ease profits this holiday season is
t strength of the economy, Schwarz
saidm
"The economy is strong. Everything
is showing a strong business
Christias," he said.
Although some students said they
don't know if their budgets will stretch
through the holiday season, others said
holiday shopping can be fun. "I'm look-
ing forward to shopping for my family,"
said LSA first-year student Mary
SGreevy, who was browsing in
Crown House of Gifts on South State
Street yesterday. "Especially not being
*with them - it makes me miss them
more," she said.
The "funding crunch many students
face can be especially noticeable during
the holidays, making shopping stress-
ful.
"I enjoy it, but it's tedious, I guess,"
said LSA senior Catherine Brown.
ere (are) a lot of people you want
to include but you can't, because
you're a student. You don't have
enough money to buy the things you
want foripeople."
With the increased number of shop-
pers, security can sometimes become a
concern for businesses.

DIVERSITY
Continued from Page 1
"Diversity means different things
to different people, and I always cau-
tion people about putting emphasis on
just numbers," Matlock said. "I also
question the goal of diversity being
everyone mixing. I just think some-
times we focus too much on students
talking together. I mean, when you
see a group of students of the same
ethnic background and say, 'Oh,
they're not interacting,' that's danger-
ous, because you're saying there's
something wrong."
Matlock said students should not
compromise their racial identities for
the sake of interacting with others.
"We shouldn't define diversity as
the goal is for all students to get
along. I mean, that sounds like an
integration model, and when you do
that you're not recognizing the racial
and gender identities that people
bring," Matlock said. "I think the ben-
efit of diversity is not only that stu-
dents are getting exposed to different
perspectives and opinions from dif-
ferent parts of the country and the
world, but also that they are being
exposed to ideas within an ethnic
group.
More than 26 percent of the
University's undergraduate enroll-
ment falls within minority categories
- either African American, Asian
American, Native American or
Latino/a. This percentage is relatively
high compared to many schools
around the country.

The University of California at
Berkeley, which is one of the only
campuses in the nation in which the
number of minority students exceeds
that of non-minority students. could
well be the epitome of a diverse cam-
pus, if demographics are the main
focus.
Jesus Mena, director of media rela-
tions at Berkeley, said that despite
racial differences students are inter-
acting and promoting the ideal of a
diverse campus.
"I'm very proud of our campus.
The atmosphere here is very good,"
Mena said. "Overall, students are
very impressed with the diversity
here. By a long shot, it's a very com-
petitive university compared to other
schools, and vny diversified."
Rice University Associate Provost
Roland Smith said Rice's campus,
which is located in Texas, attempts to
maintain a diverse campus despite
last year's monumental Hopwood
decision.
"It seems to me it doesn't do any
good for a student to come to a school
and only associate with other people
of their ethnic group," Smith said.
"And I think that at Rice, students are
expanding, more so than at other
schools. They're doing things to
incorporate everyone, regardless of
race."
Smith feels Rice, which was one of
the last schools to convert .to a non-
segregated campus during the racially
charged 1960s, has "caught up with
everyone else, but that doesn't mean
we're where we should be."

"When I talk about diversity, I'm
not talking about numbers, I'm talk-
ing campus atmosphere, about being
able to learn about the various ethnic
groups," Smith said. "We have a long
way to go before that."
Valerie Swain-Cade McCoullum,
vice-provost for university life at the
University of Pennsylvania, said
diversifying Penn is an ongoing
process.
"While there are areas where Penn
students, faculty and staff would like
to see improvements, the commitment
and collective work of many of
(them) to build and sustain a diverse
community at Penn has been extraor-
dinary," Swain-Cade McCoullum
said.
Cantor said the University of
Michigan and its diversity-promotion
programs sit among some of the best
in the nation when it comes to pro-
moting diversity on campus.
"1 think that along with a lot of
other institutions, we take very seri-
ously what diversity adds to the edu-
cational environment," Cantor said.
Rasmussen said all universities
share common goals of building
diversity.
"It's very important for students
growing up in a very global commu-
nity, growing up in a very diverse
country, to have experiences with a
variety of different people;"
Rasmussen said. "It's important for
students to begin to have a dialogue
so that when they go out into the
world, they will be able to have a
knowledge of the different cultures."

KEVIN KRUPITZER/Daily
Paul Speights, a security sergeant for Briarwood Mail, talks to 5-year-old Jacob
Holda In front of the mall's Christmas Display.

Sgt. Larry Jerue of the Ann Arbor
Police Department said many mall
stores hire extra security help to deal
with the onslaught of shoppers.
"Most of the stores use undercov-
er security guards," he said. The
security guards pose as shoppers and
mingle with the crowds, keeping an
eye out for suspicious activity, he
said.
Cindy Krasny, manager of Crown
House of Gifts, said her business
tries to keep an eye out for
shoplifters during the holiday sea-
son. "We try to take preventative
measures," she said.
But Schwarz said the security
guards at Briarwood Mall can be seen
helping people with their bags more
often than nabbing shoplifters.

"Basically I think our security
department is really into customer
service," he said. "There (are) not that
many bad guys to chase."
Jerue said parking in Ann Arbor can
also cause headaches during the holiday
season.
"Parking is a major problem," he
said, noting that police receive the most
complaints about cars "parked in fire
lanes."
Schwarz said the atmosphere at
Briarwood during the holiday shopping
season is upbeat and cheerful.
Information booth employees can be
seen wearing "Christmasy outfits," and
Christmas music is played on many
days, he said.
"It's great fun. Everybody's in a good
mood," Schwarz said.

TICKETS
Continued from Page 1.
intent on attending the New Year's Day game.
"I think it'll be at least two more hours, but I'll wait as long
as it takes," said LSA first-year student Reza Kafi. "I don't
think the line has moved. People have just squished together."
LSA junior Danielle Cross, LSA senior Cynthia Chen and
LSA sophomore Eric Prowse arrived at 8:15 a.m. to be among
the first in line when tickets officially went on sale at noon.
Like most University students, Cross and Chen will fly to
Los Angeles. Students are paying a range of prices for travel.
Some, like LSA first-year student Candice McNeal, say they
have purchased reasonable fairs.
"I'm just glad I don't have to pay $1,000 for plane tickets,"
she said. "I got mine a while ago for $300."
Cross and Chen also saved money by booking a flight prior
to the Ohio State game, a bit of optimism that paid large div-
idends. They even had a back-up plan in case Ohio State won.
"We would have just had a nice vacation in L.A.," Chen
said.
Flying, though the favored means of getting to the game, is
not the only method - especially if time is not a concern.

Prowse, along with approximately 100 other students, will
take a bus to Pasadena from Ann Arbor.
"It's going to be a two-day trip," Prowse said, saying he
expects the drive to take around 35 hours.
For some, like LSA first-year student Mike Fatf,
Michigan's Rose Bowl berth is a great excuse for a family
vacation in the area.
"My friends are going too, but I'm going with my father"
Fatt said.
Michigan Journalism Fellow Dan Popkey was planning a
family vacation to Disney World. Instead, while the rest of his
family is celebrating 1998 at Cinderella's Castle and Mr.
Toad's Wild Ride, Popkey will celebrate the football team's
success in Pasadena with several other journalism fellows -
and his 86-year-old grandmother.
"She's a sports fanatic, and she had never been to a college
football game. She grew up rooting for Michigan," Popkey
said.
Popkey invited her to attend the Iowa game this season.
"During the game she kept saying, 'I can't believe I'm
here,"' Popkey said. So when she called to wish congratula-
tions after the Ohio State game, Popkey had a novel idea. "I
asked her to come with me," he said.

ABLE CHILDCARE needed 10-15 hrs./wk.
After school & weekend eves. 6 & 9 yr. old
boys. 66 3482.
CHILD CARE & LIGHT household duties.
S & 7 .yr. old boys. Approx. 30 hrs./wk. Own
car & ref. 930-0539.
CHILD CARE NEEDED. Trans. req. Non-
smoker. Refs. Tuesdays 4-9, occas. wknds.
Summer hrs. avail. $8/hr. 995-9095.
HANNAH AND HER SISTERS (4 y/o
twins & 7 y/o) seeking fun, reliable, & loving
siter for Winter term. Mon. & Wed.
0-5 p.m. & possibly Sat. mornings 9
a.m.-1 p.m. Must have own car & be a non-
smoket. Call Sharon at 663-4154 after 5 p.m.
MOTHER'S HELPER wanted for care of
infant riplets. Full or part-time beginning
January. Infant care experience & references.
$8/hour. 747-6945.

!!! A SPRING BREAK '98*** Cancun,
Jamiaca, Bahamas, South Padre, Key West,
Panama City, Daytonal " Meals & Drinks"
Package $39 for deposits received by
December 151 Group discounts for 8 or
morel Tropical Tours Inc. @ 1-800-931-
8687.
!!***PHISH TIX:***!! 12/5 & 1217 - 2 tix
for each show. 930-1686. Darren.
$ LOW FARES WORLDWIDE Instant
urchase Eurail passes issued. Regency
Travel 209 S. State 665-6122.
$ SPRING BREAK Reps wanted for
Acapulco from $559. Quad. Puerto Vallarta
from $629 Quad. Call Dan Regency Travel
665-6122. 209 S. State Street.
$ STUDENTS Purchase your tickets with
Continental vouchers & Amex card. Regency
Travel 209 S. State St. 665-6122. Frances.
***14 SPRING BREAK SHOPPING
DAYS LEFT! NOW is the best time to
guarantee the lowest rates and best hotels.
Price will increase Dec. 15th! LEISURE
TOURS packages to South Padre, Cancun,
Jamaica, and Florida. Group Discounts for 6
or morel 800-838-8203 or
www.leisuretours.com
***FREE SPRING BREAK TRIPS! Put
posters on campus, eam free trips! No selling
required! Bahamas, Cancun, Florida,
Jamaica! Best prices & trustworthy company!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386.
***ROSE BOWL TIX wantedl
Will pay top $1
1-800-755-8497.

abady" De e t S r 8 ir
DRIVE YouRSE 8 & SAVE
D
4
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**SPRING BREAK**..."take 2" Organize
group! Sell 15...take 2 free. Jamaica, Cancun,
Bahamas, Fla., Barbados, Padre. Free parties,
eats, drinks. Sunsplash Tours 1-800-426-
7710
**SPRING BREAK '98! Free food &
drinks! Cancun, Bahamas, Jamaica, &
Florida from $3991 Organize a small group &
travel FREE! Highest commission & lowest
price! Call Surf & Sun Tours to become a
campus rep. (800) 574-7577.
2 ROSE BOWL TIX wanted by Pennsyl-
vania Mom for graduating son, a devoted
Michigan fan. Please help! Email
mlm@epix.net or call (717) 737-5323.
AAAHHH! Spring Break '98. Best Prices to
Mexico, Jamaica, Bahamas, Florida. Group
Discounts & Free Drink Parties! Sell Trips,
Earn Cash & Go Free! !-800-234-7007.
www.endlesssummertours.com
BUYING & SELLING Rose Bowl &
Parade tickets. 800-955-2916.
IS SEACHING FOR THE
PERFECT SPRING BREAK
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LET THE MICHIGAN
DAILY CLASSIFIED'S
TAKE YOU AWAY TO
FUN IN THE SUN I

ROSE BOWL TICKETS
Wanted!
1-800-269-8499.

ROMANTIC GETAWAY- Cozy log cabins
on lake. $54-79 ntly. Incl. hot tub, canoes &
more. Traverse City. 616/276-9502.
ROSE BOWL TICKETS- Best offer! Sec-
tion 21 & 23. Call Rob 818-550-7555.

; .
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The Bio Blue Scary

rm1 us'

by seth benson and ion weitz

&2MAA, RWPIN& PMM C-A
(- NMG I(, Ow
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.
PER f RSON (EPENDJ4NG ON DEOSTHAIOQR I BREAK DATS i LENGTH OFSTAY
1-800-SUNCUASE
www.sunchose.com
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parties, taxes! Get a group - go freel Prices
increase soon - save $501
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386,
**SPRING BREAK CANCUN &
JAMAICA $3791 Book early - save $501 Get
a grou - go free! Panama City $1291 South
Beach (bars close 5 am!) $1291
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386.
SanaMOS rem $sn
Diohmas Cron $'iz1
NOW HIRING REPSI
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«i i i

SCUBA-DIVE IN KEY LARGO 12/26-31;
Tropical fish and shipwrecks galore; Info. on
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A sk about- our legndary
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SKI-7 DAYS & NIGHTS, Shanty Creek. N.
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SPRING BREAK '98 - Sell Trips, Earn
Cash & Go Freel!! STS is now hiring campus
reps. Check out our great trips to Jamaica &
Mexico. Call 800/6484849.
SPRING BREAK '98 Cancun from $389
Reps wanted! Sell 15 and go free! The best
party package in Cancunl 15 free meals
Lowest Prices Guaranteed Call 1-800-446-
8355 www.sunbreaks.com
STUDENT TRAVEL BREAKS...Stamos
Travel at Kerrytown Mall. Downtown Ann
Arbor. Call 663-4400.

BASKETBALL FAN LOOKING for UofM
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LESSONS-STRING-WIND-PIANO. You
can play today - Herb David Guitar Studio
302 E. iberty665-8001.

,w

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omw

a 4 &.urs cftwe

A . *Zb t RIAA 'r4
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FLORIDA SPRING BREAK from $1291
person. Sandpiper Beach Resort. Panama
City, FL. Tiki Bar, hot tub, world's longest
keg party. Free info. 1-800488-8828.
www.sandpiperbeacon.com
GLI TIX- Support youth hockey- buy from
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Same price as at the door! $8GA.
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YOU DON'T KNOW what "hot" is 'til you
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333 E. Huron, 761-6650.

A BABY TO LOVE and nurture and to
share our warm and happy home is.opr
dream. Expenses paid. Call Dawn and Mike
1-800-484-6138, ext.-9830.

Bahamas Party
Cruise $279

- ._

I

I 1

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