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December 01, 1997 - Image 19

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The Michigan Daily, 1997-12-01

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FOOTBALL

The Michigan Daily - SPORTSMonday - December 1,1997 - 9B

Finally! Spartans whip Penn State

EAST LANSING (AP) - Joe Patemo expected
Michigan State to run the ball. He just never dreamed the
Spartans would run it so well. Sedrick Irvin and Marc
Renaud each ran for more than 200 yards against No. 4
Penn State as Michigan State rolled to a 49-14 victory
Saturday, virtually killing the Nittany Lions' hopes for a
berth in an alliance bowl game.
"I was surprised with the way they ran," Paterno said.
"I knew they were going to run, but I thought it would be
a contest. They're good backs, but we've got to tackle
better than we did."
Irvin rushed 28 times for 238 yards and three touch-
downs; he also caught one of two touchdown tosses by
Todd Schultz. Renaud rushed 21 times for 203 yards,
including a 42-yard scoring dash. Afterward, Michigan
State (4-4 Big Ten, 7-4 overall) accepted an invitation to
play in the Aloha Bowl on Christmas Day.
It was the first time Penn State (6-2, 9-2) had ever had
an opponent with two 200-yard rushers. The Spartans'
452 total rushing yards allowed were the most ever by a
Penn State team, topping the old mark of 425 yards by
Notre Dame in 1989.
"I thought we practiced well this week," Patemo said.
"The thing I don't think people realize is how good
Michigan State is, and that worried me. Michigan State

really killed themselves all year.
"They really should have been an 8-2 team if they
kicked a couple of field goals."
Penn State was outplayed through much of the first
half, but came back from a 14-0 deficit to tie the score
14-14 at 3:45 of the third quarter. Then, the Spartans
answered with two touchdowns in a span of 2:56 and
added three more touchdowns before the game's end.
"What I was most proud of is the way we came back
after they tied it up," Michigan State coach Nick Saban
said. "There have been times when we've shown a capac-
ity to not be able to respond to a situation like that."
It was Michigan State's first victory over a ranked
opponent since Nov. 4, 1995, when the Spartans upset
No. 7 Michigan. It was also the first time the Spartans
had knocked off a team ranked higher than No. 5 since a
1990 victory over Michigan.
Penn State's Curtis Enis rushed for 106 yards on 16
carries, including a 54-yard touchdown dash, giving him
a school-record eight straight games of 100 yards or
more, breaking the mark set by Blair Thomas in 1989.
Enis has 17 career games of 100 yards.
Mike McQueary, who was 13 of 27 for 176 yards with
three interceptions, passed 14 yards to Joe Jurevicius for
Penn State's other touchdown. Still, the Nittany Lions

were held to 313 yards and only 14 first downs. Penn
State turned the ball over four times.
"I've said since August that Michigan State was going
to be the toughest game of the year," McQueary said.
"They proved me right today. Still, it's hard to say why we
lost. But at certain times this season we have lost.
focus. All we can do now is regroup and try to play4
great bowl game."
The loss snapped Penn State's four-game winning
streak against Michigan State and denied Paterno his
299th career victory.
"These things are hard to explain," Paterno said. "All
of a sudden they get loose, they get confident, and they
take off. Then we can't get in a groove."
Schultz, who completed 17 of 23 for 144 yards with
one interception, tossed a 19-yard touchdown pass to
Gari Scott in the first quarter and Renaud went 42 yards
for a 14-0 lead with 3:48 left in the second quarter.
But the Nittany Lions quickly rallied. Enis broke his
long touchdown run just before the half and McQueary
connected with Jurevicius for the score with 11:15 still
remaining in the third quarter.
"We felt good at that point," McQueary said. "it was
14-14. We thought things were going to start going our
way."

AP PHOTO
Michigan State's Marc Renaud ran for 203 yards and a touchdown as he and Sedric
Irvin combined for 441 rushing yards to beat Penn State, 49.14, on Saturday.

Tennessee, Nebraska survive upset bids

3 , - B

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) -
Jamal Lewis gained 196 yards and
No. r. Tennessee clinched the
Southeastern Conference Eastern
Division title with a 17-10 victory
over Vanderbilt on Saturday.
The Volunteers (10-1, 7-1) earned
their first division crown since the
leagii&split into divisions in 1992,
will play Auburn for the SEC
and automatic alliance bowl
beith next Saturday at Atlanta's
GeorgtaDome.
Vanderbilt (3-8, 0-8) put up yet
anothevaliant defensive effort -
the Cammodores held on to the
leaguc's No. 1 defensive ranking by
holdiigithe Vols to 339 yards - but
en.ded Without a conference victory
for'the second straight year.
unidteers quarterback Peyton

Manning ended his home career
with 12 completions in 27 attempts
for 159 yards, an interception and a
touchdown.
The Volunteers seemed to have
figured out the Vanderbilt defense
in the second half, but couldn't hang
onto the ball. Tennessee fumbled at
or inside the Commodores' 20 three
times in the half.
The Vols' defense was up to the
task, however, holding Vandy to 215
total yards and coming up with four
turnovers. Vols cornerback Dwayne
Goodrich intercepted two passes
and recovered a fumble.
What proved to be the winning
score came after Goodrich inter-
cepted a Damian Allen pass and
returned it 4 yards to the Vanderbilt
41 early in the third quarter.

NEBRASKA 27, COLORADO 24
Ahman Green rushed for 202
yards and two touchdowns and No.
2 Nebraska survived a fourth-quar-
ter scare to keep its national cham-
pionship hopes alive with a 27-24
victory over Colorado on Friday.
Scott Frost passed for 92 yards
and ran for 76 yards and a score as
the Cornhuskers (11-0, 8-0 Big 12)
extended their conference winning
streak to 39 games.
Colorado (5-6, 3-5) completed its
first losing season since 1984.

The Buffaloes, who entered the
game as 21-point underdogs, fell
behind 27-10 after a dominating
third-quarter by Nebraska. The
Huskers gained 234 yards in the
period, had nine first downs and
held the ball for 11:05 compared
with 3:55 for Colorado.
But the Buffs rallied as John
Hessler threw two late touchdown
passes - a 32-yarder to Marcus
Stiggers with 3:16 left and, after a
successful onside kick, an 18-yarder
to Robert Toler with 2:37 left.

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