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December 01, 1997 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-12-01

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, December 1,.
LeLoCA STATE
esega1 system offeso ptions to sexual assault victims

1997 -7A

By btephanie Hepburn
Daily Staff Reporter
Last month, University alumna Cara Foley
gave a tearful testimony that prompted a
Washtenaw County judge to nullify a pre-
nged legal agreement and send her criminal
se ual assault case to trial.
The legal system can often provide men and
women who, like Foley, have faced sexual crim-
indfconduct, a way to put their alleged assailants
behind bars, said Lori Coates, Washtenaw
County's assistant prosecuting attorney.
According to police standards, there are cer-
tairr consistent elements that distinguish differ-
entEforms of sexual assault. First-degree and
third-degree sexual assault deal with penetration
* me sort. Second-degree and fourth-degree
ns deal with contact.

Coates said a woman's first step in getting a
possible assailant behind bars is to report the
incident to police.
"The report then comes to us," Coates'said. "We
review whether the criminal charges will be autho-
rized."
Sarah Heuser, former interim director of the
Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention
Center, said it is important to remember that
regardless of which way a person chooses to
cope with being raped, it is the right way for that
person at that time.
"It is important to support them no matter
what decision they make," Heuser said.
If a survivor decides to bring charges against
alleged assailants, there are concrete ways to ensure
the legal process will move ahead more smoothly.
"It is important for the survivor to not show-

er," Heuser said. "Don't wash your clothes or
things related to the scene that go to the
Michigan State Police criminal lab."
Ann Arbor is not free of incidents of criminal
sexual conduct. Earlier this month, a 21-year-old
student was allegedly sexually assaulted in
Nichols Arboretum. After holding her at knife
point, the perpetrator committed an act of first-
degree criminal sexual assault, the student said.
Scientists at the Michigan State Crime Lab use
an examination kit to learn DNA traits of an
assailant, which can be used as evidence in a trial.
At University Hospitals, survivors can be treat-
ed for injuries and tested for sexually transmitted
diseases, using prophylactic treatments adminis-
tered by midwives. DNA tests performed on hair,
skin and semen can provide circumstantial evi-
dence that holds up strongly in trial.

"DNA is an acceptable science," Coates said.
"DNA analysts testify in court on their findings
and can influence the ultimate decision of thejury"
After the survivor decides to press charge. a
police report is filed and revie ed by prosecu-
tors to determine whether criminal charges will
be authorized.
If prosecutors decide to pursue criminal
charges, a preliminary hearing is set to formal-
ize the complaint against the defendant.
"In the preliminary hearing, some evidence is
submitted," Coates said. "At the probable cause
hearing, not all of the information has to be pre-
sented. You just have to prove to the judge that
there is probable cause that the person charged
committed the crime."
In many cases, a judge reviews the information
and decides whether the case should go to court.

Foley, who claims she was raped bya faimily
member in 1991, said when the judge at her pre-
liminary hearing said the case x Ias goino to trial,
she was both happy and relieved. Folk said her
trust was shattered after the incident.
"I thought he was family," Foley sai. "If you
can't trust family, who can you trust?"
Foley said the results of the preliminarv hear-
ing, which was held in September, encouraged
her to press on to trial against her assailant
Though the case is still pending, Foley said the
fact that it is going to trial made her confident
that the defendant would receive punishment for
what he did to her.
"This hearing feels like a win," Foley said at
the time. "Three months is just too easy. I would
rather have a good ending, and he got the maxi-
mum sentence possible."

2000
Cohtlnued from Page 1A
will have to be overhauled and converted, as they are
curently not "century compliant." Next, many programs
that are written to calculate, rather than simply store
data, have to be included in the conversion process.
F lly, the University's omnipresent chips, in uncount-
a e machines and software, will have to be replaced or
adjusted.
Thiele and her colleagues have been working on an aggres-
sivt 28,000-hour plan to design a solution that would be
eftive across all University administrative areas. She said
the team plans to have a reliable system in place by the end
of this year, which will leave a year to rectify any discrepan-
cies that might occur.
Thiele said efficient and aggressive attitudes toward
sowing the century debacle are necessary to correct a
prolem that was caused largely by a failure to think about
tfuture.
'J'he century concept was a far-away one at the time,"
ThIle said. "People thought that this stuff (programs) were
not"oing to last that long. Well, guess what, it has!"
Pioblems that may arise with the coming millennium go
far,.beyond tiny computer chips and complicated jargon,
Thile said.
There is very little in our lives which is not affected

by this phenomena," Thiele said.
thing is affected ... The problem
our dependence on information

"Anything and every-
is as wide in scope as
technology and chip

In memory

technology is vast ... Now is only the time to check and
assure if our standing is a safe one."
Thiele said even when reliable correction programs
are in place, communication within the University com-
munity will be key to the project's success.
"The University and all its schools, colleges and depart-
ments need to be aware and on their toes about knowing if
their programs are 2000 compliant or not," Thiele said.
"Neglection could be adverse.'
Jose-Maria Griffiths, lTD executive director and chief
information officer for the University, said everyone on
campus needs to realize the millennium problem is com-
ing.
"The lTD has done well and we are in remarkably
good shape compared to other institutions. Our early
start helped us along ... What concerns us now is the
issue of awareness," Griffiths said. "People need to be
aware of whether their systems, old or new, are 2000
compliant."
Griffiths said horror stories of the millennium bringing
with it plummeting elevators, crashing bank accounts, and
failing medical equipment are greatly exaggerated.
"Come January 1, 2000, we will be in great shape,"
Griffiths said.

GLINIC
Continued from Page 1A
tioning of the girl by Mildred and
the mother showed bias and was
grssly negligent.
,Allowing the mother to partici-
pak in the questioning was a "clini-
ca decision" and "kind of a last-
re;'ert technique," Faller said in tes-
tiliony.
The clinic later concluded the girl's
*g of allegations appeared to be true.
* Jackson County judge hearing

the custody dispute said he disre-
garded the clinic's report, but he
granted custody of the girl to the
mother and phased in unsupervised
visitation for the father.
More than two years later, the judge
awarded custody to the father after
Child Protective Services and state
police determined the mother had been
emotionally and sexually abusing the
girl.
Some psychologists testified the
mother had a paranoid personality dis-
order.

AP PHOTO
Crosses at the cemetary at the Nyumbanl House in Kenya mark the graves of children who have died as a result of
AIDS-related Illnesses. Today Is World AIDS Day.

4 1,EXTRA CASH for the holidays?.
rary employment opportunities avail.
at Niesen's Flowers. Possibility of per-
manent position. Ask for Therese. 994-6112.
NOTETAKERS NEEDED Immediate
aopengs. Seniors and grads. Attend class,
takenotes. Earn up to $14/lecture. Variety of
classes, flexible schedule. Faculty approved
clas~qs only. Apply at Grade A Notes, 549 E.
University Ave. Or call 741-9669 for more
info.
NOTETAKERS
Lap top computer
$10.00 per hour part-time/ temp.
Attend classes with U of M Students.
Take notes on our laptop computer.
Must ype 80-100 words per minute less than
80...need not apply.
call: ioan E. Smith Svcs for Deaf & Hard of
Hearing Students leave a message 763-1083.
Most openings start in January.
OFFICE PERSON: Part time, 20 hr./wk.
Il town Ann Arbor, flex. sched. MAC
sis, 761-7204.
PART TIME OFFICE position- in our small
medical office. Excellent opportunity for a
motivated individual. The position entails
general office duties, some data entry. Some
clerical experience and some knowledge of
Windows 95 desired. 10-20 hrs./wk., flexible
hours. Available immediately. Fax resume
(313) 677-2423.
POST-ACUTE BRAIN INJURY
PROGRAM has immediate openings for
direct care staff. $8.00/r starting pay; more
dg~mingon education and experience. Earn
onaicome and gain valuable hands-
on experience. Full, part-time, and job shar-
ing pgsitions available. Ay at 3200 E.
Eisenhower Patkwav or cl 13-677-0070.

SECURITY GUARDS to work on U of M
campus. Apply at State Security Services,
525 Church St. 998-7201. E.O.E.
SPECIAL GIFT-We're looking for healthy
women between the ages 21-35 for egg
donation. All ethnic backgrounds are
encouraged. Fee paid. Send inquiries to
AARMA, P.O. Box 2674, Ann Arbor, MI
48106.
STUDENT MANAGER positions in food
service. Start at $7.80/hr. in a new 6 floor site
at ISR. 2 hr. a.m. shift Mon., Tues.,Thurs., &
Fri. + 2.5 hr. p.m. Thurs. shift Call Charles at
764-8512.
SUB TEACHERS NEEDED for rapidly
growing district with lots of o rtunty 90
credit hours required, SouthLyonCorn-
munity Schools, 15 min. NE of AnnArbor,
248-437-9373.
UM EXHIBIT MUSEUM seeks friendly
students to work in education programs &
store. Work study & non avail. Applications
avail. 1st floor Ruthven Bldg. Call 647-1371
for info.
WANT TO MAKE SOME EXTRA
CASH? Young Judea is looking for a part
time Office Manager in Ann Arbor. Required
skills include: Macintosh, typing, and a
flexible schedule for 30 hours per week.
Preferred skills include: Previous office ex-
p and bookkeeping. For additional in-
formation please call Debi Banooni at (313)
994-8500.
child care
ABLE CHILDCARE needed 10-15 hrs./wk.
After school & weekend eves. 6 & 9 yr. old
boys. 663-3482.
CHILD CARE & LIGHT household duties.
5 & 7 yr. old boys. Approx. 30 hrs./wk. Own
car & ref. 930-0539.

CHILD CARE NEEDED. Trans. req. Non-
smoker. Refs. Tuesdays 4-9, occas. wknds.
Summer hrs. avail. $8/hr. 995-9095.
CHILDCARE PROVIDER Wanted. 2 days/
wk. eves. 4-6:30 p.m. Occasional sick care.
769-7464.
HANNAH AND HER SISTERS (4 y/o
twins & 7 y/o) seeking fun, reliable, & loving
baby sitter for Winter term. Mon. & Wed.
12:30-5 p.m. & possibly Sat. mornings 9
a.m.-1 p.m. Must have own car & be a non-
smoker. Call Sharon at 663-4154 after 5 p.m.
!!: A SPRING BREAK '9g*** Cancun,
Jamiaca, Bahamas, South Padre, Key West,
Panama City, Daytonal " Meals & Drinks"
Package $39 for deposits received by
December 151 Group discounts for 8 or
more! Tropical Tours Inc. @ 1-800-931-
8687.
$ $ $ SAVE $ WHEN FLYING! Flat rate
for special low fare, or if my fare is lower
than the lowest fare you find, you pay half
\he differencel 913-4616.
$ LOW FARES WORLDWIDE Instant
purchase Eurail passes issued. Regency
Travel 209S. State 665-6122.
$ SPRING BREAK Reps wanted for
Acapulco from $559. Quad. Puerto Vallarta
from $629 Quad. Call Dan Regency Travel
665-122 S. State Street.
RELIABLE SPRING BREAK TOURS.
Bahamas, Cancun, & Ski Trips!
FREE FOOD & FREE DRINKS!
Sign up before Nov. 30. Organize
a group-travel free. Call for Details
and free brochureK
Call 1({888) SPRING BREAK Today!

$ STUDENTS Purchase your tickets with
Continental vouchers & Amex card. Regency
Travel 209S. State St. 665-6122. Frances.
***ACT NOW! Call Leisure Tours for
Spring Break Packages to South Padre,
Cancun, Jamaica, and Florida. Reps
needed...travel free and earn commissions.
Group discounts for 6 or more people. 800-
838-8203 or www.leisuretours.corm
,.. .. . .. -
FLORIDA
Call today Space is limited
1800 648=44
on-aCmposadl
Amberiones@213-1211
Jesrpb Brak@761-6442
Ada Derenfw@ff.6 .
l34'A^on 0*" Hanover ,MO210T6
***FREE SPRING BREAK TRIPS! Put
posters on campus, earn free trips! No selling
required! Bahamas, Cancun, Florida,
Jamaical Best prices & trustworthy companyl
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386.
**SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS Party
Cruise! 6 days $279! Includes meals, free
parties, taxes! Get a group - go free! Prices
increase soon - save $50!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386,
Can4Unf, cr~ $399
Jamaica cr~ s$399 _
NIf Wjas Cro $EP
NOW HIRING REPS!
*~p wwedesumetu~o

SPRING BREAK '98 Cancun from $389
Reps wanted! Sell 15 and go free! The best :
party package in Cancun! 15 free meals
Lowest Prices Guaranteed Call 1-800-446-
8355 www.sunbreaks.com
STUDENT TRAVEL BREAKS...Stamos
Travel at Kerrytown Mall. Downtown Ann
Arbor. Call 663-4400.
SUN, SURF, SAND, SUDS, and S... Spring
Break with Bianchi-Rossi Tours in Acapulcol
Packages from $445.90. Party package
includes: Free cover, Free drinks, VIP
service, & more. Call for info 800-875-4525.
www.bianchi-rossi.com

Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
6 Days * Most Meals * Free Parties *includes Taxes
Canclun $399
7 Nights AirMotel - Free Meals & 21 Hours Free Drinks
Jamaica '419
7 Nights- Air + Hotel -Save $150 on Food & Drinks
Florda 119
South Beach, Panama city, Daytona, Cocoa Beach
Sprn Break Travel-Our 11th Yeart
ROMANTIC GETAWAY- Cozy log cabins
on lake. $54-79 ntly. Incl. hot tub, canoes &
more. Traverse City. 616/276-9502.
ROSE BOWL TICKETS- Best offer! Sec-
tion 21 & 23. Call Rob 818-550-7555.
ROSE BOWL TICKETS
Wanted!
1-800-269-8499.
SCUBA-DIVE IN KEY LARGO 12126-31;
Tropical fish and shipwrecks galore; Info. on
the trip & classes 888-348-3472.
SKI-7 DAYS & NIGHTS, Shanty Creek. N.
MI for 6-$200/skier. 248-643-0503.
SPRING BREAK '98 - Sell Trips, Earn
Cash & Go Free!!! STS is now hiring campus
reps. Check out our great trips to Jamaica &
Mexico. Call 800/6484849.
No y Doer pringS r k ett r
DRIVE YORSE r & SAVE

_-

LESSONS-STRING-WIND-PIANO. You
can play today - Herb David Guitar Studio
302 E. Liberty 665-8001.
annunements

BASKETBALL FAN LOOKING for UofM
B-ball shoe. 1985 b-ball shoe - gold navy
Nike dunk. Will pay up to $350 new or used
Call 1-800-921-5411.
MAKE MONEY!! Be in the movies!!
Interested? Call (773) 506-4522.
YOGA SIX WK. session beg. Tues., Dec.2.
12:10-12:50. First Congregational Church,
State & William. 663-3798.
food & entertain.
miema
TIOS SELLS MICHIGAN'S finest
Mexican style food and the world's hottest
sauces. Stop by 333 E. Huron, or call 761-
6650. We deliver!
0Ai . Dersonal.

wr i i n in - r

LOOK Ss! ifs 141
U1IVEIyIWE' (105.
p..

by John Stempien

1114 #Ev TO REMND
YOU TWO 14 POWANCE
Of A CoLLEGU £lOCA1bo
IN FUMIN4G'fiE (lidICAL
S ANMARDS OF OUR
DEORC

" MLL. US A6ouf
SUBSfANCE AAUSE
ON CAII?9! YEAH.
(~~IIiit
,I

IM USbAW pH
Of. A~f4 DI~. NFANOIA

: 24g7:17
*SPRING BREAK CANCUN &
JAMAICA $379! Book early - save $501 Get
a group -,go free Panama City $1294 South

A BABY TO LOVE and nurture and to
share our warm and happy home is our
dream. Expenses paid. Call Dawn and Mike
1-800-484-6138, ext. 9830.

I

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