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November 26, 1997 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-11-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

LoCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, November 26, 1997 - 7

U-M Flint raises money
from student donations

By Hong Lin
For the Daily
With the holidays approaching, giving is on the minds of
many people. But officials at the University of Michigan's
Flint campus hope students will be especially generous
when opening their pocketbooks --- generous enough to
donate to their school.
The University's Flint campus recently began a student
pledge campaign, which involves asking students to donate
money to the University while they are still in school.
"What we really wanted to accomplish through this cam-
paign is introduce the idea of giving to our student body,"
said Dan Haggerty, president of the Student Government
Council.
Dino Hernandez, director of annual giving, said the cam-
paign is based on altruistic motives.
"The main purpose of this campaign was to introduce the
idea of giving. I was instilled with the idea of giving at a
young age," Hernandez said. "We feel that it would be ben-
eficial for our students to be exposed to that same idea.
"Other schools around the nation have similar campaigns
like ours that only involves graduating seniors. Our thinking
was: Why only graduating seniors? Why not involve the

"Typically only about 18-20 percent of our alumni donate
money back to the school. Hopefully, through the introduc-
tion of this campaign now, they will learn to give back to the
school" said Haggerty, adding that the University's Flint
campus also needs to supplement state funds.
Haggerty said the Flint campus hopes to raise a total of
$5,000 from its students and has already netted $3,450.
"All the money that we get will go towards buying a 60-
inch television," Haggerty said.
Hernandez labeled the fundraising campaign "very suc-
cessful."
"We only expected about 10 percent of the students to
give, but more have given. No one had been upset by us
approaching them," Hernandez said.
But students said the reaction is more mixed.
"Many people had donated, while others are upset by it,
said Stephanie Hooker, a junior at the School of
Management on the Flint campus.
Jenny Prezzato, a sophomore in the School of Arts and
Sciences on the Flint campus, said she would back the cam-
paign --- if she could. "If I had the money, I would donate
because I like the campus."
Both Hooker and Prezzato said the fundraising campaign
has not exactly taken the student body by storm. Hooker

AP PHOTO
[An Alcom Electric employee puts the finishing touches on a display of oversized Christmas lights yesterday in New York.
Detroit Metro Airport targets
upscale travelerYit al

1 $786 million airline terminal opens
other opportunities for commerce
DETROIT (AP) -- Forty stores and a conference hotel
are on tap for Detroit Metropolitan Airport by late 2001,
with the addition of the. facility's $786 million midfield
terminal.
The-mall and hotel would enable the airport to tap into an
international market of businesspersons flying in and out of
Detroit for meetings on the same day.
"That is not a market that is open for us today because we
don'thave the facilities that are amenable for large numbers
.people flying in for a meeting for a day and then flying
t," Bob Braun, Wayne County's airports director, told the
Detroit Free Press in a story for yesterday. "That would open
a whole new market for us."
Both the new midfield terminal and a mile-long east con-
course are being designed to allow another three to five sto-
ries, each up to 500,000 square feet. The hotel would be
included in the additional stories.
Wayne County, which owns the airport, is expected to
solicit bids from hotel chains in 1998 or early 1999. But two
national chains already have asked about building and oper-
ng the hotel, Braun said.
he mall would be located beyond security checkpoints in
a section of the terminal, allowing travelers to shop in the
upscale stores.
More than 23.6 million travelers are expected to pass

through the new terminal during its first year. It will be used
by Northwest Airlines, the airport's principal carrier, and
international flights.
The county is studying what kind of shopping and dining
should be offered. Two national consulting firms, Booz Allen
& Hamilton of San Francisco and Unison Consulting Group
Inc. of Chicago, are expected to finish the study in May or
June.
Detroit architect SH&G plans to use the results to com-
plete its design of the terminal.
Booz Allen & Hamilton and Unison will decide which
retailers and restaurants will work best by looking at pas-
senger incomes, shopping and dining preferences, and
time spent at the airport. They also are examining which
of the airport's existing concessions makes the most
money. The data will then be compared with that of other
airports.
Braun said food and beverage concessions will get the
most space because they are the most popular and prof-
itable. Retail stores will have the second-largest amount
of space; duty-free shopping will get the least.
Other airports that have opened shopping malls inside
their facilities include Pittsburgh International Airport,
Denver International Airport and Amsterdam's Schipol
Airport.
John F. Kennedy International Airport's Terminal One
will feature European and U.S. designer shops when it
opens next spring in New York.

whole student body?"
A low alumni donation rate played
campaign.
QUADRUPLETS
Continued from Page 1
Multiple fetuses are in more danger
than a single fetus because they are fre-
quently born premature, which can
cause developmental problems.
But premature babies often grow up
perfectly healthy. The four Treber girls,
born nine weeks premature, are all liv-
ing at home and progressing well.
Another factor influencing the com-
monality of multiple births is the growing
number of older women giving birth.
"The older the woman, the higher the
incidence of multiple births," said
obstetrics Prof. Robert Hayashi, direc-
tor of Maternal-Fetal Medicine at the
University's Medical Center.
Many of the women who seek fertility
treatments are older and the combination
of fertility drugs and age often translates
into multiple births, Hayashi said.
Doctors will often advise patients
with multiple fetuses to abort some of
them, so the others can be more healthy
in a procedure called reduction. The
Trebers said they are happy they chose

not to opt for a reduction.
"The rewards are so much greater
than the risks," Tabitha said. "We pre-
vented the risks. My mother went on
bedrest early on and ate a lot of food."
There are two types of fertility drugs, a
tablet taken orally called clomiphene cit-
rate and an injected shot of follicle stim-
ulating hormone, Christman said. Both
drugs enhance ovulation, the production
of eggs in a woman's body, and hence
increase the chances of fertilization.
"One of our goals is to use all of
these medications cautiously,"
Christman said. "A healthy pregnancy
is preferably one baby."
Another option is invitro fertiliza-
tion, in which eggs are removed from
the woman, fertilized and placed back
into the uterus. Fertility drugs are used
to produce a high number of eggs in the
woman, and often more than one fertil-
ized egg is put back.
Simple chance also plays a role in the
occurrence of multiple births. In the case
of the Iowan septuplets, the mother
received the fertility drug Pergonal. A
higher dose was administered during her

a role in starting the

said the effort is
school."

"just another thing that is going on in
first pregnancy, which resulted in only
one child, than her second pregnancy.
when she conceived the septuplets.
The costs of giving birth to so many
babies can take a financial toll on the
family. In addition to the expense of the
fertility treatments, hospital stays and
the labor process can be exorbitant. For
the birth of the Treber quadruplets, 29
doctors were present while the mother
had a Caesarean section.
"Financially, it's affected us vry
much," Tabitha said.
Patients require different doses of the
fertility drugs, depending on their ages
and other factors. The task of regulating
how much of a fertility drug to give a
patient is left to the discretion of fertili-
ty centers.
"Obviously, our goal is to make a
diagnosis and use the least risky treat-
ments," Christmar said.
Still, most doctors agree thathe
advent of fertility drugs has been a pos-
itive addition to the world of obstetrics.
"Fertility drugs have brought happiness
to a lot of families that wouldn't have had
children otherwise," Hayashi said.

DELIVERY/DRIVER/WAREHOUSE.
Small retail furniture store has part-time posi-
tionis open. Must be experienced, responsible,
hardworking. Chauffer's license or valid
driver's .license required. Benefits and ad-
vancement potential. Call 996-0707.
EARLY CHILDHOOD Substitutes needed.
Have fun working with young children &
earn extra cash at the same time. Work ac-
cording to your schedule. Call Pat @ 668-
0887.
ENTHUSIASTIC, FRIENDLY PEOPLE
ded for fast-paced, first class tanning
11n. Morning, afternoon, happy hour &
weekend shifts available. Apply @ Tanfastic
627 S. Main St. Ann Arbor or 533 E.
Michigan Ave. Saline

EXPERIENCED STAFF NEEDED FOR
THE ANN ARBOR PUBLIC SCHOOLS
SCHOOL AGE CHILD CARE
PROGRAMS.
Days: Monday-Friday
Hours: 7:00-9:00 a.m.
and/or
'3:00-6:00 p.m.
(part-time)
Pay rate: $6.90 per hour
For more information call Vickie Malcolm at
994-2313.
(For those with less than five days a week
availability, please call AnnMarie Furlong at
971-1896 to be placed on the Child Care
Substitute list. Pay rate: $6.20)
FEMALE NUDE MODEL wanted for photo
project. Good pay. Easy work. 973-8791.

FRIENDS GIFT SHOPS
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS
W R 2 T Cashier experience helpful, 8-18 hrs.
evenings, weekends, holidays. Some daytime
hours available. Work-study students qualify.
Now through holidays and beyond. $6.25.
R. Call 936-5971 after 12 noon.
ii

The Big Blue Scary

by seth benson and jon weitz

GRADUATING SENIORS- Mackinac
Island's Murray Hotel needs year-round
manager. Live/work 6 months on Mackinac
Island and 6 months in Ann Arbor. Call: 1-
800-462-2546 or write: P.O. Box 7706, Ann
Arbor, MI 48107. Fax resume to: 313-665-
2644.
HANDY MAN 10 hours per week. Flex.
schedule. Basic electrical, plumbing, and car-
pentry skills needed. $7-58/hour. Call 995-
0748.
I NEED HELP!
Overwhelmed!
I will help you get started!
Earn $5000 to $10000 per month p/t
Fantastic support! No selling.
Not multi-level marketing.
Call for free 2 minute message.
1 (800) 995-0796 ext. 1647.
JOBS, JOBS, JOBS!
$6.50+/hr. Create your own sched. Valuable
computer & comm. skills. Flexible hours &
fun atmosphere. Paid training.
For application & info stop by MI Telefund,
611 Church #304 or call 998-7420.
MEUER
Cashier positions available. Starting at $7.09
and up based on experience. Flexible shift
preference. **One hour study breaks**
Arrange groups to work the same schedule
for carpooling options! Other positions also
available. EOE
Immediate Interviews
3145 Ann Arbor-Saline Road
MUSIC INDUSTRY Booking agency seeks
interns Call Jeremy after 11am 995-5777.
NEED EXTRA CASH for the holidays?
Temporary employment opportunities avail.
at Nielsen's Flowers. Possibility of per-
manent position. Ask for Therese. 994-6112.
NEED HELP MOVING 2 bedroom apart-
ment in town. Thurs. Nov. 27. $10.00/hour.
Call 313-930-6065.
NOTETAKERS NEEDED Immediate
openings. Seniors and grads. Attend class,
take notes. Earn up to $14/lecture. Variety of
classes, flexible schedule. Faculty approved
classes only. Apply at Grade A Notes, 549 E.
University Ave. Or call 741-9669 for more
info.
OFFICE PERSON: Part time, 20 hr./wk.
Downtown Ann Arbor, flex. sched. MAC
skills, 761-7204.
POST-ACUTE BRAIN INJURY
PROGRAM has immediate openings for
direct care staff. $8.00/hr starting pay; more
depending on education and experience. Earn
additional income and gain valuable hands-
on experience. Full, part-time, and job shar-
ing positions available. A p ply at 3200 E.
Eisenhower Parkway or call 313-677-0070.

SERVICE REP NEEDED, Are you self
motivated & possess exc. communication
skills? Do you have an enthusiastic per-
sonality/attitude? Exc. compensation
pa4age. Up to 30 hrs./wk. avail. Call Mike
or Brad 662-5485.
SPECIAL GIFT-We're looking for healthy
women between the ages 21-35 for egg
donation. All ethnic backgrounds are
encouraged. Fee paid. Send inquiries to
AARMA, P.O. Box 2674, Ann Arbor, MI
48106.
STUDENT MANAGER positions in food
service. Start at $7.80/hr. in a new 6 floor site
at ISR. 2 hr. a.m. shift Mon., Tues., Thurs., &
Fri. + 2.5 hr. p.m. Thurs. shift Call Charles at
764-8512.
child care
ABLE CHILDCARE needed 10-15 hrs./wk.
After school & weekend eves. 6 & 9 yr. old
boys. 663-3482.
ACTIVITIES LEADERS and assistant
teachers needed full and part time available.
Call 663-9004 or stop by 350 S. Fifth
Avenue.
BABYSITTER NEEDED for 2-year-old in
my home. Weds. & Fri. 11-3. 994-5512.
CHILD CARE NEEDED. Trans. req. Non-
smoker. Refs. Tuesdays 4-9, occas. wknds.
Summer hrs. avail. $8/hr. 995-9095.
CHILD CARE & LIGHT household duties.
5 & 7 yr. old boys. Approx. 30 hrs./wk. Own
car & ref. 930-0539.
CHILDCARE PROVIDER Wanted. 2 days/
wk. eves. 4-6:30 p.m. Occasional sick care.
769-7464.
FACULTY PHYSICIAN looking for
responsible, female student to pick up
elementary school girl after school M-F and
stay with her till about 6:30 p.m., starting
January 5, 1998. Pick up from her AA school
is flexible (between 3:30-5:00 p.m.). Excel-
lent salary. Need own car. Call 764-6879
during day or 994-1440 and leave message or
email at rnriba@umich.edu
PART-TIME CAREGIVERS NEEDED
FOR
after-school child care program. Part-time
caregivers needed for elementary-age after-
school child care program at the Jewish
Community Center. Experience with children
is desirable. Hours are 3:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
$6.50/hour to start. Raise after 3 months. Call
971-0990 and ask for Craig Pollack.
tickets & travel

***FREE SPRING BREAK TRIPS! Put
posters on campus, eam free trips! No selling
required! Bahamas, Cancun, Florida,
Jamaica! Best prices & trustworthy company!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386.
**SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS Party
Cruise! 6 days $2791 Includes meals, free
parties, taxesl Get a group - go free! Prices
increase soon - save $50!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386,
**SPRING BREAK CANCUN &
JAMAICA $379! Book early - save $50! Get
a group - go free! Panama City $129! South
Beach (bars close 5 am!) $129!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386.
**SPRING BREAK**..."take 2" Organize
group! Sell 15...take 2 free. Jamaica, Cancun,
Bahamas, Fla., Barbados, Padre. Free parties,
eats, drinks. Sunsplash Tours 1-800-426-
7710
**SPRING BREAK '98! Free food &
drinks! Cancun, Bahamas, Jamaica, &
Florida from $399! Organize a small group &
travel FREE! Highest commission & lowest
price! Call Surf & Sun Tours to become a
campus rep. (800)_574-7577.

BUYING & SELLING Rose Bowl &
Parade tickets. 800-955-2916.
ROMANTIC GETAWAY. Cozy log Eabins
on lake. $54-79 ntly. Incl. hot tub, canoes &,
more. Traverse City. 616/276-9502.
ROSE BOWL TICKETS- Best offert Sec-"
tion 21 & 23. Call Rob 818-550-7555..
ROSE BOWL TICKETS
Wanted!
1-800-269-8499.
SCUBA-DIVE IN KEY LARGO 12/26-31;
Tropical fish and shipwrecks galore; Info. 06i
the trip & classes 888-348-3472.
SKI-7 DAYS & NIGHTS, Shanty Cr;;7 N,
MI for 6-$200/skier. 248-643-0503.
SPRING BREAK '98 - Sell Trips, EaM-
Cash & Go Free I! STS is now hiring cnpus
reps. Lowest es to Jamaica, MexAo .&
Florida. Call 800-648-4849.
SPRING BREAK '98 Cancun from $389
Reps wanted! Sell 15 and go freel Th. bet
party package in Cancun! 15 free meals
Lowest Prices Guaranteed Call 1-801446-
8355 www.sunbreaks.com
.,
HUNDREDS OF INSTRUMENTS.'Not
just guitars. Percusion & Wind. Herb David
Guitar Studio. 302 E. Liberty. 665-8001.
r announcements
BASKETBALL FAN LOOKING for UofM
B-ball shoe. 1985 b-ball shoe - gold navy
Nike dunk. Will pay up to $350 new or used
Call 1-800-921-5411.
MAKE MONEY!! Be in the movies!!!
Interested? Call (773) 506-4522.
THE BEST GIFT- name a star for someone.
Just $33. Celestial Presence 800-446-3985
ext.1010.
YOGA SIX WK. session beg. Tues., Dec,.
12:10-12:50. First Congregational Church,
State & William.663-3798.

ramr~..v ~4T$, yove CHOICE~
Fog. M~wl msl % PZWt SCHAR.
.A-OTE } k q+ 15 A VoreTE f
RD MEAT44SA'D
APAAKS ION POLLJC-Lf t

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AM*AHk
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Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
6 Days * Most Meals - Free Parties * includes Taxes
Cancun $399
7 Nights AirMotl - Free Meals & 21 Hours Free Drinks
Jamaica $419
7 Nights -Air a Hotel - Save S184 on Food & Drinks
Florida 1119
South Beach, Panama city, Daytona, cocoa Beach
Sprin Break Travel - Our I1th Year!
-800-678-6386 .-
AAAHHH! Spring Break '98. Best Prices to
Mexico, Jamaica, Bahamas, Florida. Group
Discounts & Free Drink Parties! Sell Trips,
Earn Cash & Go Free! l1-800-234-7007.
www.endlesssunmertours.com
ATTENTION STUDENTS-Staff-Faculty.
For all your travel needs call Stamos Travel,
special U of M line: 663-5500.
" r v -0mi

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fr t o LmDIp1uAtE. JCv mi~ka-
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fod & entertain
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