100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 07, 1997 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-04-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

8B - The Michigan Daily - SPORTSMonday - April 7, 1997

I

.. ... .. a .. _.

I

SANDW ICH&
These are not your normal sandwiches.
The bagels are softer so all the goodies don't smush out.
Goodies like turkey, ham, turkey pastrami, tuna,
chicken, sprouts, tomatoes and other stuff.
OFFER GOOD THROUGH APRIL 13, 1997. NO COUPON REQUIRED.
(LOX SANDWICH NOT INCLUDED. REGULAR DRINK SIZE ONLY.)
AM

HANG OUT KITH T HE EINSTEIN BROS.
307 State St.
741-9888
or any other of our Detroit-area locations.
01997 Einstein/Noah Bagel Corp.

,p

i

Texas Re]

Gardner, Mortimer
By Chad Kujala
Daily Sports Writer
This weekend's meet for the
Michigan men's track team contained
tough competition and a memorable
moment.
As for the competition, the Texas
Relays was the toughest meet in which
the Wolverines have run thus far.
As for the memorable moment, the
Wolverines were able to watch arguably
the best Olympic track and field per-
former in the history of the sport -
Carl Lewis.
Among the competition the
Wolverines were up against was
defending indoor and outdoor NCAA
champion Arkansas. The field also con-
tained Texas, Wisconsin and LSU.
Lewis, a former student at Houston,
has participated in the Texas Relays
since 1980. He annually enters the meet
to promote track and field.
With all of the great talent, it took
personal bests for the Wolverines to

Work Across Differences
Participate in ae
INTE RG ROUP
Dialogues among different grc
- Women & Men
- People of Color & WhiteI
- Lesbians, Gay Men, Bisex
- Jews & Christians
- Women of Color & Whitf
Intergroup Dialogues are face-to-fat
variety of identity groups. Dialogu
and journals are incorporated into t
within lines of difference and similar
Thursdays "1-pm, 2c
Register for Psychok
Intergroup Re

lays' field beefy
pick up wins, glimpse legend of Lewis
compete. For example, the tough com- fying spot, but his previous season best
petition brought out a season-best per- of 8:57.04 left him just short of the
formance from senior hurdler Neil required time of 8:57.00.
Gardner. This weekend's run, however,
Gardner qualified on Thursday with allowed Mortimer to surpass the first
a time good enough to qualify him for hump. He finished with a time of
an NCAA provisional spot in the 55- 8:45.39.
meter hurdles. His time, 51.05, was half To ensure a definite spot in th
a second behind first-place finisher NCAAs, Mortimer will have to sha
Robert Bronston of Southern and just off 1.5 seconds to meet the automatic
under a second ahead of third-place qualifying requirement of 8:44.00.
qualifier Edward Clarke of Oklahoma. Freshman Steve Lawrence finished
The final was set to be a battle first in the 5,000 with a dominant per-
between those three runners, but formance. Lawrence, like Mortimer,
Gardner didn't let that happen. Gardner won by more than six seconds.
shaved more than a second off his qual- Although Lawrence's time did not
ifying time and finished first with a qualify him for NCAAs, it shattered the
time of 50.00, qualifying him for team's season best. Lawrence finished
NCAAs. in 14:15.71.
Sophomore John Mortimer gave a The previous season best, turned
season-best performance in the 3,000 by Mortimer, was 14:30.68. Lawrence
steeplechase. Mortimer won by more performance left him close to the magic
than six seconds. All season, Mortimer number, however. The time required is
had been close to running fast enough 14:15.00.
to receive an NCAA provisional quali- Michigan's keff Beuche was able to
come home fourth in the 1,500.
The Wolverines also had some strong
performances from their relay teams.
In the 4x1,500 relay, Michigan fin-
DIALOGUE ished nine seconds behind first-place
Stanford and second-place Arkansas.O
pups: The Wolverines' 4x800 relay team
finishedtsird, five seconds behind sec-
ond-place Sanford.
People - The distance-medley team, following
Duals & Heterosexuals the same trend, also finished in third for
the Wolverines. Michigan finished
behind Arkansas and Missouri with a
e Women time of 9:49.50.
Although the four-day meet had sev-
ce meetings of individuals from a cel good events, the most exciting may
es, readings, experiential exercises have been Carl Lewis' appeanee
he process of working across and The 10-time Olympic gold medaliT
ity. ran the anchor leg for the Santa Monica
Track Club's 400-meter relay.
redits Lewis, who says that the 1997 season
)gy/Sociology 122 may his last, didn't disappoint the
12,800 fans in attendance.
For further information contact: Lewis' team finished first, giving the
lations, Conflict and Community fans, which included the college and
3000 Michigan Union high school competitors, something
936-1875 / IGRCC@umich.edu about which to cheer.
- "C m n
Vd,

Want to begin your career with immediate exposure to advanced technology? There is no better place to
look than Northrop Grumman right now. From our work on the E2C Airborne Early Warning System to
the Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (Joint STARS) to the Vehicular Intercommunications
System (VIS), Northrop Grumman's Electronics Systems Division continues to prove that the impossible is
indeed possible.
At our Electronics Systems Division facility in suburban Chicago you'll find one of the world's most
capable and experienced designers and manufacturers of highly specialized electronic systems. Our
product technologies include Radio Frequency (RF) electronic systems and electro-optic/linfrared systems.
These products have continuing near and long-term business opportunity. In fact, at Northrop Grumman
our strategic thrust into defense electronics is estimated to exceed $10 billion by the year 2000. Current
areas of opportunity include:

(MMIC/ASIC

Northrop Grumman Electronics Systems continues to be an industry leader in the development and use
of monolithic microwave integrated circuit and analog and digital application-specific integrated circuit
technology. Through this technology, complex circuits have been dramatically simplified, resulting in 70%
fewer parts, a 10:1 reduction in weight and volume, and increased performance and reliability, compared
to conventional implementations. A dramatic example of maximizing miniaturization can be found in the
microwave power module, the smallest power transmitter ever designed and constructed.

(Advanced Technology

i

Here is where the leading edge of today's electronic countermeasures technology is created. The Advanced
Technology section provides engineers with an applied research environment to simulate state-of-the-art
advances in analog, digital, RF, microwave, electro-optic/Infrared, and electron tube technologies along with
the attendant computer aided modeling and simulation techniques.

(EO/IR

ES-RM infrared jamming systems provide military aircraft with protection against a vast array of heat
seeker missile threats and are compatible with virtually all modern military and commercial aircraft and
armaments. All electro-optical/Infrared countermeasures systems provide stand-alone protection against
surface-to-air, air-to-air and air-to-ground missiles providing the flexibility to program specific countermeasure
technology against varying threats. These high-powered efficient jammers are capable of protection against
multiple infrared homing missiles.

Cn i %h1 IIJmUCU 3U1LVVrI

A

Ltmsueuucua ZIUTLvade

I

_-

_ff

Northrop Grumman is at the leading-edge of mission planning and system software development, with
expertise gained from working on Attack Missile Mission Planning Software (MPS), as well as state-of-the-
art next generation "smart" weapons system software. A joint government/industry team, using the
maturity scales has rated Northrop Grumman among the top high technology software development
companies in the industry.
JOIN US!
At our Electronics Systems Division you'll find exposure to advanced technology and tremendous career
opportunity. In addition, our location offers high quality housing, education facilities and the excitement
of Chicago's sports, entertainment and cultural activities. To find out more, send your resume as ASCII
text to resumes@eiws.esid.northgrum.com. Or you can mail or fax your resume to: Attn: Professional
Employment, Advanced Technology, Northrop Grumman, 600 Hicks Road, Rolling Meadows, IL 60008.
Fax: 847/590-3189. An equal opportunity employer M/F/D/V.
PIORTMROP GRUMMAPJ

9

'0

---A

i

t

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan