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April 03, 1997 - Image 18

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The Michigan Daily, 1997-04-03

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0e
4B - The Michigan Daily Weekend Magazine - Thunday, April 3, 1997

0

0

The Michigan Daily Week

1 About Town
Proletariat slices and bourgeois
pies round out A2 pizza fare

'Dans' theater
premieres tonight

By Michael Zlberman
Daily Arts Writer.
The reason pizza is such a quintes-
sential college food, I am thoroughly
convinced, lies in its structure rather
than its taste. The circular slab of
dough, divided by four-plus radii, is
perfectly constructed to be shared with
an indefinite number of people. The
surface will incorporate almost any-
thing, so long as it's covered with
cheese - and it's flexible even on that.
So it should come as no surprise that
even double-cappucino-minded town
such as ours seems to have a 2 to 1 ratio
of pizza delivery vehicles to the rest of
the traffic. And while they are circling
the impossible entanglement of diago-
nal one-ways that makes up Ann Arbor,
we can take a virtual excursion instead:

The Great Ann Arbor Pizza Tour.
Backroom Pizza
Right across the street from Pizza
House is a place where its surly doppel-
ganger, The Backroom, has set up shop.
The Backroom seemingly prides itself
on being the town's grimiest joint of the
kind: With its attitude and clientele, it is
the CBGB of pizza places.
First of all, it is too cool to have a
menu. If you need a menu, you take a
walk across the street. The object on
sale here is identified simply as "pizza,"
and, upon closer inspection, turns out to
be just that. It is delivered or peddled on
the spot in long, sloppy slices. The
selection of drinks is increasingly ran-
dom, from the somewhat puzzling
"Afri-Cola" to spring water to more tra-

I

ditional Lipton teas. To get to the
counter, you will have to push your way
past a throng of extraterrestrial skate-
board kids and into something resem-
bling a phone booth, but the end result
is worth it: cheap, hot pizza with zero
waiting period.
Bell's Pizza
Cheap and unsophisticated, Bell's is a
4 a.m. dorm room entree of choice;
al6-inch monster will set you back less
than eight bucks, and with some cre-
ative maneuvering of numerous
coupons, you can get away with
shelling out something in the vicinity of
$6. Of course, the product leaves a lot to
be desired; crusts are strangely wet, and
the cheese cap has a tendency to slide
off in its entirety on the first bite.
Famed for its phone operators who
barely speak English and delivery dri-
vers who, well, take their time, Bell's is
not without its share of subtle charms:
The orders come in boxes with the
apocryphal world history of pizza
inscribed on them, so the customers get
something to focus their eyes on while
eating.
Cottage Inn
With four locations in Ann Arbor
alone and 12 more in the Detroit area,
Cottage Inn is an emerging big-leaguer,
the Miramax of local pizza. Frequently
tagged as the best in the Big Ten and
armed with a moderately weird slogan
("Taste You Can See, Tradition You Can
Taste"), the Inn is an undisputed A2 sta-
ple.
The original Cottage Inn location on

By Orit Greenberg
For the Daily
What dance company would you
consider to be an ideal company?
Nederlands Dans Theater (NDT) just
might be your answer. Combining clas-
sical ballet technique with a style that
is both contemporary and avant-garde,
NDT equals absolutely amazing dance.
Tonight and Friday NDT 11 and III
make their debut in Ann Arbor at the
Power Center.
NDT is actu-
ally divided into PR
three compa- Nede
nies. NDT II,
established in Toda

e
a

CI

m

'JONATHAN SUMMER/Daily

What makes NDT so sensational,
however, is the dancers. The 14 dancers
of NDT II, who eventually join NDT I,
are vibrant and technically virtuosic.
The mature and widely known dancers
of NDT lit, which includes former.
American Ballet Theater ballerina
Martine Van Hamel; Sabine
Kupferberg (Kylian's wife), a 15-year
veteran of NDT I; Gary Chryst, a for-
mer principal dancer of the Joffrey
Ballet; and Gerard
Lemaitre, an
E V I EW alumnus of the
lands Dans original NDT I
Theater company, shows
nd Tomorrow, 8 p.m. that a dancer's
The Power Center career just gets
$20, $28 $32, $36 better after 40.
The two per-
formances feature different programs.
Both nights showcase many of
Kyliin's works, as well as other
dances by such notable choreogra-
phers as Johan Inger, Paul Lightfoot,
Ohad Naharin and the company's res-
ident choreographer, Hans Van
Manen.
In this rare joint performance of
NDT II and 111, experience their bril-
liant artistry. And let these talented
dancers show you why Nederlands
Dans Theater is so ideal!

1978, is
composed of
dancers ranging
in age from 17 to 22; NDT 111, creat-
ed in 1991, consists of dancers over
the age of 40; and NDT 1, also known
as the "Main Group," has been in
existence since 1959.
The mastermind behind NDT is
Artistic Director Jiri Kylian, who has
been hailed as the most famous living
choreographer in Europe. He refers to
the companies as "three dimensions of
a dancer's life." Each company has its
own repertoire reflecting the specific
qualities of a certain lifetime.

NYPD manager Domenico Telemaco boxes oven-fresh pizza.

William Street, much like Uno, is more
than a pizza place: two floors of seating
room (the second one has even become
a favorite study spot) and an extensive
salad and pasta menu. Pizzas as such
range from well-done traditional fare
like the Zesty Italian to excursions into
exoticism, such as the Spicy
Polynesian. Variety is the word here;
even the crusts come in four varieties
- Sicilian style deep dish, traditional
round, European gourmet thin and
Cottage Inn lite.
The William Street restaurant is usu-

National'
Mini
Storage
SPIECIAL4

1900 Old Rawsonville Rd
g0-94 N. Service Or &
Old Rawsonville Rd)
Belleville/Ypsilanti
483-7720
3500 Carpenter Road
(between Packard
and Ellsworth-South of HQ)
Ypsilanti/Ann Arbor
973-1500

ally packed. The menu choices are
slightly reduced in the satellite loca-
tions, and so are the crowds.
Domino's
Although the number of Domino's
Pizza locations in Ann Arbor is approx-
imately the same as everywhere else,
we actually house the cradle of this
sprawling franchise - Domino's
Farms, the company's headquarters.
The honor, for some potential cus-
tomers, is more than dubious: Domino's
may boast fast delivery and great sauce
with strong garlicky overtones, but that
tends to get ignored by many a socially
active student disagreeing with the cor-
poration's politics, which have been
associated with pro-life activism.
Every December, the Farms also
become the site of a Christmas lights
festival - a bacchanal of electricity
that brings joy to innumerable people,
especially those at Detroit Edison.
New York Pizza Depot
Located less than a block down E.
William St. from Cottage Inn, NYPD
Pizza is a new kid in town; having
arrived in the place of the lowly Omega
Pizza, NYPD behaves as a brash new-
comer should, shocking the pizza
addicts into submission with an array of
culinary oddities like salad, pizza and
pasta pizza.
NYPD's fare, displayed in a glass
case by the counter, comes from the
recipes of two Italian-born brothers,
Marco and Dominic, but reflect a scrap-
py New York sensibility more than any-
thing else. NYPD already has its fans:
"The best pizza in town, bar none," said
LSA senior Ariel Gandsman.
The pasta pizza, it should be noted, is
something of a college-food ideal:
Imagine a hybrid of pizza and macaroni
& cheese. Now, if they could only work in
Ramen noodles and a bottle of Jolt ...
See PIZZA, Page 5B

Work Across Differences
Participate in an ,'; .
INTERGROUP DIALOGUE
Dialogues among different groups:
- Women & Men
- People of Color & White People
- Lesbians, Gay Men, Bisexuals & Heterosexuals
- Jews & Christians
- Women of Color & White Women
Intergroup Dialogues are face-to-face meetings of individuals from a
variety of identity groups. Dialogues, readings, experiential exercises
and journals are incorporated into the process of working across and
within lines of difference and similarity.
Thursdays 1-3pm, 2Credits
Register for Psychology/Sociology 122
Have you participated in an Intergroup Dialogue or a
FIG Seminar? Do you want to know where to go from here?
Bridging the Gap: From Dialogue to Real Life
Intergroup Relations FALL RETREAT
Friday October 24-Sunday October 26
Applications available at the IGRCC office, due April 9
For further information contact:
The Program on Intergroup Relations,
Conflict and Community
3000 Michigan Union
936-1875 / IGRCC@umich.edu

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