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March 27, 1997 - Image 5

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-03-27

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NATION/WORLD

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, March 27, 1997 - 5A

i

Palestine
prote Sts
peace
eforts
RAMALLAH, West Bank (AP) -
Palestinians threw stones and burned
American flags in the streets of the
West Bank yesterday,. rejecting a new
U.S. attempt to salvage the disintegrat-
, Mideast peace process.
"resident Clinton sent envoy Dennis
Ross to try to stop the rioting and
bloodshed that started after Israel broke
ground for construction of a Jewish
neighborhood in disputed east
Jerusalem.
But Palestinians have grown suspi-
cious of America's motives in peacemak-
ing, because it blocked U.N. Security
Council censure of the housing project.
upporters of Yasser Arafat led
tests here and in the West Bank city
of Bethlehem, hurling stones and bot-
tles at Israeli soldiers. Soldiers respond-
ed with tear gas and rubber bullets,
injuring 20 Palestinians.
Israel demanded Ross tell Arafat to
rein in the violence - both the daily
rioting in the West Bank and terror
attacks, such as a suicide bombing that
killed three Israeli women at a Tel Aviv
cafe Friday.
OTerrorists will always have a griev-
ance, (but) terrorism cannot exist in a
vacuum, it needs a sponsoring govern-
ment,' Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu said at a conference on ter-
roism. "They have chosen to use terror-
ism as a weapon of political coercion."
Israel also offered an incentive to the
Palestinians, with Netanyahu aide
David Bar-Illan suggesting in an inter-
elmw with The Associated Press that
ea might ease its closure of the West
WALLENBERG
Continued from Page IA
said. "Unfortunately, this doesn't
address the conceptual problem itself."
Although the lecture received rave
reviews from the audience, some stu-
dents doubted the scale by which
*kin's ideas might be implemented in
cities.
"I'd say that the scale he's talking
about is a bit larger than what we're
working with," Berry said, "but the
underlying ideas are very functional."
The Raoul Wallenberg Lecture
series, an ongoing tradition of lectures
involving "Architecture as a Humane
Social Art," was founded in 1972
through contributions in Wallenberg's
*mory.,
Wallenberg, who graduated from the
University in 1935 with a degree in
architecture, became a Swedish diplo-
mat during World War 11 and saved
thousands of Hungarian Jews from the
terrors of Auschwitz. After his tragic
death at a Soviet prison camp, a schol-
arship fund and the lecture series in his
name were established to promote the
ideals he lived by.

STUDY
Continued from Page 1A
cent of those surveyed plan to get a
part-time job.
LSA first-year student Katie Darner
said she needed to work in the summer
to help reduce her college costs.
"I work two jobs in the summer,"
Damer said. "It's definitely always a con-
cern."
The University was more successful
than other public universities in
admitting community-service-minded
students. More than 85 percent of
respondents had participated in volun-
teer work in the past year, while 76.8
percent of students at other public uni-
versities did community service.
Darner said volunteering was' a
helpful experience. "It made me
thankful for what I have," Darner said.
"It gave me a new perspective on
things."
In alcohol statistics, more University
incoming first-year students reported
having drunk hard liquor and wine,
59.8 percent, than beer, 53 percent.

However, Mary Lou Antieau, assis-
tant to the vice-president for student
affairs, said students only had to drink
once in the previous year to answer yes.
Also, Antieau said many students
drink very lightly to celebrate gradua-
tion. "How many students had a glass
of champagne after graduation?"
Antieau said.
These alcohol statistics fall in line
with other public universities that par-
ticipated in the study. These institutions
reported that slightly more students,
56.1 percent of respondents, reported
drinking beer while 58 percent had
drank liquor or wine.
LSA first-year student Nikki Gunter
was slightly surprised by the findings.
"I would expect the beer to be higher
than the liquor. It just seems more com-
mon," Gunter said.
Fitness also was important to this
first-year class, with only 2.6 percent
reporting that they did not exercise.
More than half the class, 51.8 percent,
said they spend greater than six hours
per week exercising and playing
sports.
In addition to keeping fit, only 8.6

First-year students
. 53 percent drank beer in the
last year
* 59.8 percent drank liquor or
wine
8.6 percent smoke
51.8 percent spend more than
.. six hours exercising or doing
sports a week
87.8 percent participated in vol-
unteer work
percent reported smoking cigarettes.
One of the more surprising statis-
tics, according to Cherry Danielson,
the graduate student research assistant
who compiled the University data,
was that 67 percent of the class report-
ed they had spent no time playing
video games last year.
"This says these students don't have a
lot of time,' Danielson said.
Danielson was impressed overall
with the responses overall.
"The University really attracts quality
students," Danielson said. "We were just
a step ahead of other public Institu-
tions."

A D VLRT I S E MN T
V=VARSITY
CCLiU B
1=INTRAMURAL

U N IVERSITY Of MICHIGAN

N o

AP PHOTO
Palestinians burn Israeli and American flags in Bethlehem yesterday during a
demonstration prior to clashes between Palestinian and Israeli troops.

Bank if Palestinian security officials
resume cooperative efforts to block ter-
rorist attacks on Israelis. Israel imposed
the closure, which keeps tens of thou-
sands of workers from jobs in Israel,
after the bombing. The gap between
Israelis and Palestinians appeared far
more difficult to bridge than the last
time Ross visited the region, when he
brokered Israel's military withdrawal in
January from most of the West Bank
town of Hebron.
"The tensions between the

Palestinians and Israelis have reached a
very, very serious level, said Edward
Abington, the U.S. counsel-general in
Jerusalem and unofficial ambassador to
Arafat's self.-rule government
In an AP interview, Abington said
President Clinton sent Ross because
communication between the Israelis
and Palestinians was faltering and the
"level of trust has gone down."
"Everybody in the world who's
worked for peace in the Middle East is
concerned about this," Clinton said.

28
MEN'S SWIMMING & DIVINGN
NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS
MINNEAPOLIS, MN, NOON-7:00 PM
WOMEN'S TENNISN
AT MIAMI, 100 PM
MEN'S GOLFN
TANGLEWOOD INTERCOLLEGIATE
DALLAS, TX
MEN'S BASEBALLN
VS. PENN ST, RAY FISHER STAD ,3PM
MEN'S TRACK & FIELDN
KAMICNSVTN ATMONAL
KNGSTONJAMAIC
W/WATER POLO/C
MICHIGAN TOcU.N
CANHAM NATATORIUM
THROUGH THE 30TH

29
MEN'S SWIMMING & DIVINGN
NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS
MINNEAPOLIS, MN
NOON-7:00 PM
MEN'S TENNisN
VS OHIO STATE
VARSITY TENNIS COMPLEX, 1 00 PM
WOMEN'S TENNIS/V
AT SOUTH FLORIDA, 1.00 PM
MEN'S HOCKEYN
NCAA FINAL FOUR
BRADLEY CENTER, MILWAUKEE
WOMEN'S CREW/V
V!RGINIA/OHIO STATE DUAL
CHARLOTTESVLLE, VA

MEN'S GOLFN
TANGLEWOOD INTERCOLLEGIATE
DALLAS, TX
MEN'S BASEBALL/V
VS. PENN STATE
RAY FISHER STADIUM, 1:00 PM
WOMEN'S SOIFTBALLIV
VS UNIVERSITY OF W SCONSIN
ALUMNI FItLD, 1:00 PM
MEN'S TRACK & FIELDN
JAMAICAN NV TAT ONAL
KINGSTON, JAMAICA

30
MEN'S TENNIS/V
. VS INDIANA
VARSITY TENNIS COMPLEX, 1 :00 PM
MEN'S GOLF/V
TANGLEWOOD INTERCOLLEGIATE
DALLAS, TX
MEN'S BASEBALL/V
VS. PENN STATE
RAY FISHER STADIUM, 1:00 PM
VOLLEYBALL/I
I MSB
BROOMBALL/I
YOST
MINI-SOCCER/)
COLISEUM

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