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March 20, 1997 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1997-03-20

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2A - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, March 20, 1997
NATION/WORLD
Clinton picks CIA insider to head agency

A CIA Deputy Director
George Tenet chosen
to lead agency
The Washington Post
..WASHINGTON - President
Clinton yesterday named George Tenet,
who has been deputy CIA director since
1995$, as his choice to head the spy
agency and predicted he would win
easy Senate confirmation.
., Tenet, a 44-year-old former White
.House and congressional staff member,
.has, been running the CIA as acting
director for -the past three months.
Clinton said Tenet's experience on
Capitol Hill will help him garner
enough bipartisan support to avoid the
bitter confirmation battle that sank for-
mer national security adviser Anthony
Lake's nomination for the top CIA job
earlier this week.
Hours before departing for Helsinki
for a summit with Russian President
Boris Yeltsin, Clinton said he thought it
was important to name his replacement

-."of

for Lake with dispatch.
"I believe that we should not leave
these positions vacant long, particularly
in the national security area, but
throughout the government," Clinton
said, adding, "I didn't see any point in
waiting around."
Tenet will be confirmed, Clinton told
reporters, "because he's well known to
the Senate and well respected by
Republicans as well as Democrats."
Although Tenet doesn't have the top-
level national security experience of
most previous CIA directors, his favor-
able confirmation prospects were the
decisive factor behind his nomination,
according to administration officials.
They said he emerged as front-runner
almost immediately from a small list of
contenders at the start of the week.
Even before he was named, Tenet
received praise from Senate Select
Committee on Intelligence Chair
Richard Shelb (R-Ala.), who set many
of the hurdles that ultimately tripped up
Lake.
Once Clinton made it official, Shelby

issued a statement saying he had known
Tenet for "several years" and consid-
ered him a "man of integrity and pro-
fessionalism."
But White House officials are not
taking confirmation for granted. Tenet,
they said, huddled
at the White House
for several hours
yesterday in the
office of Deputy
Chief of Staff John
x P o d e s t a .
Administration
officials tried to
anticipate all man-
ner of questions
Tenet that might arise,
and crafted with
Tenet what his responses would be.
Tenet, standing by Clinton and Vice
President Gore, called his nomination
"a bittersweet moment" because he had
been looking forward to serving as
deputy to "my good friend Tony Lake."
He said he had "always believed there is
no room for partisanship in the conduct

of our intelligence community," and
that "we must always be straight and tell
you the facts as we know them."
One serious question about Tenet,
according to CIA sources, is whether he
will be able to deal with Defense
Secretary William Cohen and Secretary
of State MadelaineAlbright as an equal.
"Remember, he was a staffer on the
intelligence committee, working for
Cohen who was a senator and a ranking
member" said one intelligence source.
"He's now going to play with the heavy
hitters and there is a fear that more
intelligence activities will migrate to
the Defense Department,"he added.
One leveler may be that Tenet will
have Cabinet rank, according to White
House officials. Only Deutch and the
late William Casey sought and were
given that rank while CIA director.
The job Tenet was nominated to has
three separate components. There is the
best-known role as director of CIA, the
country's prime spy agency, but he also
would be the president's chief adviser
on intelligence matters.

SAROUfND THE rw.NiATI .
Senate aproves finance investigtion
WASHINGTON - The Senate yesterday brushed aside Democratic
objections and approved a Republican resolution seeking an independ4n(t
counsel to investigate allegations of illegal fund-raising in the 1996 prey
dential election.
The non-binding resolution, approved on a party-line vote of 55 to 44, calls on
Attorney General Janet Reno to ask a federal court to appoint an outside prosecu-
tor because of what it described as strong evidence of possible official wrongdor
ing on behalf of President Clinton's re-election.
Democrats complained that the Senate should not be telling Reno what to doand
that Congress should also be investigated if an independent counsel is appointed.
They proposed a resolution of their own to that effect but it was rejected, 58 to 41.
Three Democrats who have urged appointment of an outside counsel - Sens:
Russell Feingold (Wis.), Daniel Patrick Moynihan (N.Y.) and Paul Wellstone
(Minn.) - voted against both resolutions.
"The attorney general should appoint an independent counsel to investig*
alleged improprieties by Democrats and Republicans" in presidential and congres-
sional campaigns, Moynihan said. It is the only way to conduct a probe withoig
"dissolving into partisan bias" and the "appearance of a conflict of interest" he
added.

U U

"4 PRESENT

The University of Michigan
Program for the Study of Complex Systems
Third Annual
Interdisciplinary Symposium
on Complex Systems

Artist Willem de
Kooning dead at 92
EAST HAMPTON, N.Y. - Willem
de Kooning, whose swirls and slashes
of color helped define abstract expres-
sionism and made him one of the 20th
century's greatest painters, died in his
studio yesterday. He was 92.
De Kooning's abstract expressionist
works included traces of the earlier sur-
realist movement and prefigured Pop
art. Along with Jackson Pollock, he led
the group of artists who helped New
York replace Paris as the center of the art
world in the years after World War 11.
"I don't paint to live, I live to paint,'
he said in his 80s. "It's a nice thing to
look forward to."
De Kooning painted daily until the
late 1980s, even after being diagnosed
with Alzheimer's disease. In 1989, after
a bitter court fight, he was declared
mentally incompetent and control of his
estate was given to his attorney and his
daughter, Lisa, who is his only survivor.
De Kooning's death came just two
months after New York's Museum of

Modern Art opened an exhibit of his late
paintings, titled "Objects of Desire."
Among his meticulously composed
canvases was his 1944 "Pink Lady,"
which brought $3.63 million at aucti@
in 1987.
Researchers follow
up on Martian life
Seven months after the startling
report that traces of primitive ancient
Martian life may have been detected in
a meteorite from Mars, scientists met in
Houston this week to discuss 34 new
scientific papers of follow-up researe
on the topic.=V
"We feel that the evidence of past
biogenic activity (in the rock) is much
stronger now than when we wrote the
paper," said Everett Gibson of the.
NASA team that made the claim.
"There are no show stoppers. We
believe the criticism that has been lev-
eled at us can be answered. ..: This;is
science in action."
Gibson said about a third of the n
papers raise questions that his team
feel compelled to deal with.

March 20, 1997

Rackham Amphitheatre

1:00 - 6:00 pm
Opening Remarks
Robert Savit, Director
Program for the Study of Complex Systems

1:00 pm
2:15 pm
3:30 pm
4:00 pm
5:15 pm
6:00 pm

Rules for the Evolution of a Genetic Switch
Michael Savageau, The University of Michigan
The Simplistic Roots of Complexity
Harold Morowitz, Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study
George Mason University
BREAK
Natural Selection and Complex Systems
David Sloan Wilson, Binghamton University
Panel Discussion on group selection and its implications.
Panelists from UM include John Holland, Professor of
Psychology & EECS, Randolph Nesse, Professor of
Psychiatry, and others.
Reception - Assembly Hall

f..
AROND HE <.

INF LI-E 764 The Symposium is free and registration is not required. Inquiries can be
directed to Katherine Richards at 763-3301 or kjrich@umich.edu
a i i

i

p

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F :
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b'..

Worldwide TB
cases leveling off
A strict but inexpensive tuberculosis
control program has caused the world-
wide TB epidemic to level off for the
first time in years at an estimated 16
million to 20 million active cases, the
World Health Organization reported
yesterday.
Global implementation of the strate-
gy, called "directly observed treatment
short-course" (DOTS), could prevent
as many as 10 million deaths world-
wide during the next 10 years, the
WHO projected in a new report.
DOTS, in which health workers
ensure that patients take all their medi-
cine for a full six-month course of
treatment, "produces cure rates as high
as 95 percent, even in the poorest of
countries," the report said. The
approach eventually could "cut in half"
the global trend of the disease, which
results in 6 million to 8 million new
cases annually, the WHO said. Prior to
1996, incidence had been rising by
more than l million cases a year, and

WHO had predicted an annual incre
of 10.2 million cases by 2000.
Three-fourths of the world's Ta
cases are in 13 countries, includia
China, India, Bangladesh, Brazil,
Indonesia, Mexico and Zaire.
Conditions are particularly severein
Pakistan, Ethiopia, Thailand, the
Philippines, South Africa and Russia.
Albanian officials
try to get aid
TIRANA, Albania - Looted wat
houses and empty prisons left offi-
cials struggling yesterday to find a
way to'get humanitarian aid past the
armed gangs terrorizing much , of
Albania, while southern rebels ruled
out using force for the first time in
their bid to oust President Sali
Berisha.
At least three more people were
killed yesterday in the southern Oty'
of Korca, which has been caug'
between rival organized-crin
gangs.
- Compiled from Daily wire reports.

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