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March 19, 1997 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-03-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Recreating a legend

Linda Finch points to a crowd of thousands of well-wishers Monday at an International Airport in Oakland, Califor
before boarding an airplane for an attempt at a re-creation and completion of Amelia Earhart's around-the-world f
Internet pornography put
test against decency laws

The kkashington Post
Today, the Supreme Court hears a
challenge to the Communications
Decency Act, the 1996 law that
Congress passed as part of the massive
telecommunications reform bill. The
case throws a spotlight on Internet erot-
ica - one of the few moneymakers in
the so-far-disappointing world of
Internet commerce, and one of the most
closely watched segments of the online
world by companies that hope that
some day they, too, will profit from
their substantial investment in the
online world.
On its face, the federal decency law
is a simple attempt to protect minors
from being exposed to the objection-
able material that can be found on the
Internet. But a broad coalition of busi-
nesses, civil libertarians and academics
opposes the law. The law's critics say it
will not achieve the government's laud-
able ends, in part because so much adult
material originates overseas, outside
U.S. jurisdiction.
Software tools that already are

available can provide the filters that
parents crave, said. Jerry Berman of
the Center for Democracy and
Technology. "We want an effective
solution to keep our kids out of the
red light district in cyberspace,"
Berman said. Those arrayed against
the law argue that the restrictions
would have a chilling effect on the
legitimate uses of the burgeoning
medium; a special panel of three fed-
eral judges agreed, and last year
declared the law unconstitutional.
Anti-pornography activists say such
arguments misconstrue the legislation.
"I'm sick of the whining by porn
addicts who say, 'I want my porn TV,"'
said Bruce Taylor of the National Law
Center for Children and Families, and
who helped write the law. "Tough
luck." Taylor says that Microsoft's Bill
Gates and other leaders of high-tech
companies who have spoken out
against the act were misled by civil lib-
ertarians.
"I don't want to get into whether any
of this is right, wrong or indifferent,"

Holler said. "Product is pro
know? We're a statistics com
Online sex is certainly bc
recent survey of the field by
publication Interactive Week
the combination of low cost
lar subject matter made them
the most active and lucrati
digital commerce in cybers
estimated 10,000 adult site
about SI billion in reven
mostly through credit card try
the magazine said.
Other businesses watch t
merchants so closely bec
hope someday to have onlin
that people will be willing to
well, said Donna Hoi
Vanderbilt University prof
studies cyber-commerce. "T
are literally on the bleedi
using futuristic software suc
video and nuts-and-bolts te
for billing and security, Hof
"All mainstream businesses
those same issues and willi
technologies."

jro
rnia
flight.
to
,duct, you
pany.'
oming.
ythe trai
fountd that
andpopu-
"arguably
ve area of
pace the
S generate
ue yearly,
ansactions,
he eroti s
ause th
e material
pay for as
ffman, a
essor who
hese guys
ing edge,"
h asenline
chnologies
fman said.
s will fa .
need tho
ity road-
rs' efforts.
it by just
united,"
ve nson
cey sai
protesters
Wasting
spaking
ail nst
oy.
1 we are
to do is
colege

w'ho-rant
r' ) cey
conetiin
hom s-
r th ro-
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yb
tbout
ieuce
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F I

PLAYBOY
Continued from Page 1
their bodies," Mecey said. "They also
have to have enough confidence to deal
with the controversy that will be
involved."
Among the protesters who gathered
outside was LSA sophomore Colette
Stevenson, who said the group of pro-
testers spontaneously gathered based on
an e-mail message.
"We believe in ourselves" Stevenson
said. "We do not have to be told by
Playboy that we are only a body
because we are much more than that."
However, Playboy hair and makeup.
stylist Karen Lynn said protesters actu-
ally help bring publicity to Playboy.
"(This means) more publicity for us,"
Lynn said.
Mecey said the protesters bring more
attention and might alert students who
had been unaware of Playboy's arrival
on campus.
"Protesters help shine a great spotlight

that we are here without us having to rely
on the media," Mecey said. "Students
being so busy might not listen to the
radio. With the protesters we might get
coverage" -
Mecey said he
was impressed to We d
see students speak4
their minds. to be to
"I think it's
great for students Playboy
to be outspoken,"
Mecey said. areO nly
"(Students) are1
young. (and) are - C
learning how to be
good adults."
During the interview process, pho-
tographers took a Polaroid of fully-
clothed applicants. Mecey and Lynn
said they will make their final selection
of three students by the time they leave
campus late today.
Protesters were forced outside by
hotel security and were not allowed into
the hotel to witness any of the inter-

viewing process.
But Stevenson said secur
blocks did not hinder protester

"We are making

our poin
being
w Ste%

ol

not have said.
Me
dlbythep
were
that we time
a body... Playb
"Al
ette Stevenson here
LSA sophomore find
girls v
to be models for our calendar
said. "They should protest s
more national - issues like 1.
ness."
Lynn also said that many o
testers are misinformed.
"The protesters are misguid
said. "I do not think many oft
have ever looked through a Play

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