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March 14, 1997 - Image 11

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uritdftga TD~j

PRO
BASKETBALL
Detroit 102,
DENVER 82
DALLAS 109,
Boston 107
Seattle 108,
MINNESOTA 92
GOLDEN STATE 101,
Cleveland 95

Phoenix 112,
L. A. LAKERS 96
Toronto 103,
SACRAMENTO 96
PRO
HOCKEY
Montreal 3,
BOSTON 0
FLORIDA 5,
Vancouver 4

NEW JERSEY 6,
Hartford 0
PHILADELPHIA 5,
Edmonton 4
N. Y. Islanders 3,
TAMPA BAY 0
St. Louis 4,
LOS ANGELES 2
PRO
BASEBALL

CHICAGO (AL) 4,
Detroit 1
Montreal 5,
ATLANTA 4
ST. LOUIS 4,
Cleveland 1
New York (AL) 3,
TORONTO 1
FLORIDA 4,
Baltimore 1

Friday
March 14, 1997

11

layoffs
hat UP
onight
foricers
J ran Stilman
D '~Sports Writer
11-1, 8-0, THAT'S BLOWOUT
CITY, BABY!
Even though the Wolverines defeated
Alaska-Fairbanks by those scores last
weekend in the first round of the CCHA
playoffs, chances are good that Michigan
w be involved in much tighter games
for the remainder of the postseason -
,'vever far the Wolverines advance.
Michigan's first tough test in the play-
bffs could come against Bowling Green
in this evening's CCHA semifinal at Joe
Louis Arena. The
No. I seed,
jN1ayoffs Michigan, and the
At Joe Louis No. 4 seed,
Arena, Detroit Bowling Green,
face off at 5 p.m.,
(1) MIchigan vs. followed by the
vowling other semifinal
an, game between
today, 5 p.m. No. 2 Miami
(Ohio) and No. 3
t12Miami (Ohio) Michigan State at
"3) Michigan ' 8:30 p.m.
If any team is
today, 8:30 p.m. capable of
destroying its
danpionship opponent, it's
gaE' Michigan, but his-
trrow, 730 tory says that one-
goal games are
: All games an more likely than
PAIS. blowouts in the
postseason.
TIckets: Available' -The Falcons are
for both nigts certainly capable
through of playing the
Ticketrmaster, Wolverines close.
(810) 64-6666. While Michigan
defeated the
F icons in both games at Yost Ice Arena
9 season, 4-1 (Nov. 9) and 6-1 (Feb. 1),
the Wolverines needed two third-period
goals to gain a 3-3 tie at Bowling Green
on Nov. 16.n
id for the Wolverines, a close game
oeems more pressure on goaltender
Marty Turco.
Over the last three years, the junior
' ndtminder has shown he can step it up
M&-d~come through when it counts the
t- in the playoffs.
}UIurco has a career winning percentage
'f825 and a 2.37 goals-against average.
''n the playoffs, not including this season,
Bheo has stoned opponents with a 1.96
G'AA and a .833 winning percentage.
It was Turco's performance in the
1994-95 NCAA semifinal against Maine
that proved his worth to Michigan coach
Red Berenson. Turco stopped 52 of 56
t in that game which did not end
in Maine scored 28 seconds into a
h period.
He kept us in that game. Maine had a
rat team" Berenson said. "They had
tigat scoring chances. Turco defied them
to score. He proved then that he was a
playoff goalie."
~ ~ow that playoff time is here again,
is prepared to be the.deciding fa-
"oif necessary.
gonna make a difference,
' hether it's in the first period or in the
Speriod," Turco said.
1' urco also says that he is not con-

cerned with the increased pressure goal-
tenders feel in the playoffs.
"I know, come tournament time, that
we're not gonna score as many goals as
W Would like. I'm the last line of
defense. Pressure is what you make out
6f if I'm not too worried about the pres-
sure".
And Berenson doesn't worry too
ch about his goaltender. Throughout
career, Turco has rebounded well
after making a wrong play or giving up a
bad goal.
"Some goalies will get rattled, some
goalies will start not being sure,"
Behnson said. "He's got that way about
See TURCO, Page 13

--Take

that

Blue bounces Miami
with hot second half

By John Leroi
Daily Sports Editor
After a week of distractions, the best thing
about Michigan's win yesterday was that the
Wolverines finally got to get back on the court.
A 76-63 win over Miami (Fla.) got the
Wolverines to the second round of the NIT, but
it also gave Michigan players a chance to put
behind them what has been a week of turmoil.
"The best thing for us was to get back on the
court;" said- sophomore center Robert Traylor,
whose rela-
i $ Michigan 76 withn s h i p
- - JIEUU~bEwith a
J Miami (Fla) 63 named Ed
Martin and
new Chevrolet Suburban have been the focal
point of alleged NCAA rules violations.
"It felt good just to get back on the court and
play and not worry about any thing else. As far
as I'm concerned, all of that is over. We're here
to win the NIT."
Since the Athletic Department admitted on
Monday to committing two minor NCAA rules
infractions, controversy has brewed as to what
else exactly is going on with the basketball pro-
gram.
While the Athletic Department adamantly
denies any major NCAA violations, a story in
yesterday's Detroit Free Press quoted two
unnamed sources saying Martin had given
money to current and former Wolverines and
has been doing so for years.
So Michigan coach Steve Fisher had his
hands full, preparing for the Hurricanes and
weathering the stress of the tumultuous week.
"Probably I was effected more than anyone
in terms of concentration," Fisher said. "We just
tell our kids to control what they can.
"I'm sure the distractions won't disappear. It
probably won't go away right away, but we
can't let that affect our job on the court."
The Wolverines' (20-11) next assignment
will be a second-round game on Tuesday at
Crisler Arena with Oklahoma State (19-12),
which knocked off Tulane last night.
The win over Miami (16-13) was the first

postseason victory for any current Michigan
player. The Wolverines have bowed out in the
first round of the NCAA tournament each of
the last two seasons.
Michigan drowned the Hurricanes in the sec-
ond half, mostly due to hot shooting, but also
with an aggressive defense. The Wolverines
shot a spicy 63 percent in the second and held
Miami to just 36-percent accuracy.
The Wolverines led by just one at halftime
but used a 14-3 run early in the half to stake a
55-41 lead. The Hurricanes crept back within
five, but Michigan went on a 19-9 run over the
next eight minutes to put the game out of reach.
"In the first half it seemed like we were play-
ing because we had to, not because we wanted
to," Fisher said. "In the second half we had
more enthusiasm defensively and that created
more of an offensive flow."
The Hurricanes had trouble all night ,with
Michigan's size. Although Miami out rebound-
ed the Wolverines, no Hurricane could find
much offense in the paint. It didn't help that
All-Big East second-teamer Tim James,
Miami's only real inside threat, fouled out mid-
way through the second half. If it weren't for
senior guard Clifton Clark's 25 points, the
Hurricanes wouldn't have even been in the
game.
Michigan forward Maceo Baston put togeth-
er a personal highlight reel, with two ridicu-
lously amazing slams in the second half on his
way to 19 points. Baston was just one of four
Wolverines in double-digits on the night.

After a messy week, Michigan center Robert Traylor is finally smiling. He has reason to: The Wolverines beat
Miami (Fla.) last night in the first round of the NIT, the first postseason win for this group of Wolverines.

Postseason wi gives Wolvernes reason to smile again

aceo Baston's soaring one-handed
slam toward the end of the
Wolverines' win over Miami (Fla.)
last night was the icing on the cake, and a
symbol for the Wolverines.
He soared through the air, and so did
Michigan - into the second round of the

danced into the lockerroom.
The Wolverines haven't smiled in a long
time, and they didn't deserve to either. You
remember the five-straight losses, blowing the
game against Minnesota and having it rubbed
in their faces in their own house? Remember
Illinois reeling off a 41-9 run? Remember
how the Wolverines needed overtime to beat
Ohio State, not making the NCAAs and the
most recent buzz about possible NCAA viola-
tions --big time violations?
So Mr. Baston, tell the world why you are

so happy.
"I'm just happy that we have a postseason
win for the first time in my career," he said.
Bingo, give the man a dollar.
The win is what it's all about.
This group of Wolverines won a game in
the postseason for the first time. It doesn't
matter that it wasn't in the NCAAs, but just
in the NIT - the "Not Invited Tournament;"
the "Not Interested Tourney," the "Not in
Tucson" tourney (my personal favorite).
But whatever, you get the picture and the

Wolverines get the win.
Personally, I'm in shock that Michigan
was able to beat the Hurricanes so soundly
with all that has been going on.
The Wolverines won despite just 18 fans
on hand at Crisler Arena. Even Maurice
Taylor said, "... we only had about 150 peo-
ple here,"(his estimate is probably closer:
after all, he did have the better view). They
won despite reading all of the newspapers
dotted with those ugly accusations and tales
See RUMORE, Page 12

. DANIELLE
RUMORE
Rumore
Has It

N IT.
He smiled and pumped his fists as the
crowd erupted with the basket and subse-
quent foul on the play, and so did the
Wolverines as the clock expired and they

Colorado takes down Hoosiers

WINSTON-SALEM N.C. (AP)
Chauncey Billups scored 24 points as
Colorado handed Indiana an opening-.
round defeat for the third straight year.
Billups, a second-team All-
A m e r i c a n,
scored 20 points
39 in the first half
as Colorado.
built a 46-31
lead. The
Buffaloes (22-
NCAA 9), making their
tournament first NCAA
appearance in
28 years, went on to beat Indiana (22-
11) by 18 points, matching the
Hoosier's worst NCAA tournament
defeat in 71 games.
PURDUE 83, RHODE ISLAND 76, OT
Brad Miller had a career-high 31
points and eight rebounds and Purdue

scored the first six points in overtime.
Freshman Brian Cardinal, whose 3-
pointer with 16 seconds left in regula-
tion forced OT, hit the first basket in
the extra period, and Purdue (18-11)
never trailed again.
The Rams (20-9) had their chances
to win in regulation. But Tyson
Wheeler's leaner bounced off, and
Michael Andersen missed the follow
before the buzzer.
IOwNA 73, VIRGINIA 60
Guy Rucker scored 19 points and
Andrew Woolridge added 17 as Iowa
coach Tom Davis improved to 10-0 in
first-round games.
Iowa (22-9) never trailed and led by
as many as 22 points in the second half
before a late scoring spurt by
Virginia's Harold Deane cut the final
margin.
KANSAS 78, JACKSON ST. 64

Scot Pollard, coming back from a
broken foot, grabbed a career-high 19
rebounds to go with six blocks and 12
points in top-ranked Kansas' victory.
Pollard, All-American Raef
LaFrentz and Paul Pierce over-
whelmed 16th-seeded Jackson State.
LaFrentz had 18 points, 14 rebounds
and three blocks, and Pierce had 19
points, 13 rebounds and four blocks as
Kansas (33-1) had a 61-27 rebounding
advantage.
KENTUCKY 92, MONTANA 54
Cameron Mills scored 19 points, his
third consecutive career high, as the
defending national champions routed
Montana.
Wayne Turner also scored 19 for
Kentucky (31-4) , while Ron Mercer
added 16. Bob Olson and Ryan Dick
scored 10 apiece for Montana (21-11).
See NCAAs, Page 12

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