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January 13, 1997 - Image 20

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The Michigan Daily, 1997-01-13

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10B - The Michigan Daily - SPORTSMonday - January 13, 1997

Men's track sweeps
Hoosiers, Spartans

Women's track rolls
to inaugural victory

By Chad Kujala
Daily Sports Writer
The Michigan men's track and field
team hosted its opening meet of the
indoor season Saturday and came out on
top. In front of a packed track building,.
Michigan escaped with a narrow victory
in the triangular meet, beating Indiana
and Michigan State.
The event was also scored as a double
dual meet between the three schools. In
the dual meets, the Wolverines beat the
Hoosiers, 66-55, and the Spartans, 76-
41.
The Wolverines got off to a quick start
as junior Don McLaughlin and senior
Scott McDonald finished first and sec-
ond respectively in the mile run.
McLaughlin redshirted the cross-coun-
try season this past fall and feels that his
performance Saturday was due to that
fact.
"I have an edge, because all the other
guys ran cross-country," he said. "I was
able to rest all season and do speed work
while the others had to do strength
work."
McLaughlin was not done winning,
however, as he took first place in the 800
meters. Although he concentrated and
prepared mostly for the mile run, he was
able to come out on top of the 800-meter
race.
"I was mainly interested in the mile
and run around a 4:10 and hopefully
win. After that, I wasn't really thinking
about the 800:'
Another star performer for the
Wolverines was Olympian Neil Gardner.
Gardner's first victory came in the 55-
meter hurdles. His time of 7.33 seconds
qualified him for a provisional spot in
the NCAA championships.

Even though Gardner spent the sum-
mer running for the Jamaican Olympic
Team, his opening time surprised even
him.
"This was my fastest opening time,"
he said. "I was really surprised at my
time because it's my third-fastest time
overall."
The meet was close throughout the
day, coming down to the final race.
Michigan saved its best for last as it
pulled out first- and third-place finishes
in the 4x400-meter relay. The Michigan
"A" team trailed Indiana the first two
legs but was able to fight its way back in
the last two legs to eke out the win by
less than a second.
The Michigan "B" team also turned in
a solid performance by finishing third,
solidifying the Wolverines' victory.
Michigan's victory was a complete
team effort, as Damon Devasher won the
high jump and Dwayne Fuqua won the
600 meters.
Michigan coach Jack Harvey was
pleased with the team's performance.
"I'm happy," he said. "I figured it was
going to be close. I wasn't sure if we had
enough depth, but overall everyone
seemed to be in good shape."
According to Harvey, the team has
come together as one unit which has
helped them this year.
"With these guys I feel that we've got-
ten a cohesive unit and everyone seems
to support each other really well,"
Harvey said.
Gardner also echoed this point.
"We're really trying to work on it
(team unity) this year. In the past, it has
hurt us," he said.
"We're all a unit now and I think will
be a force to reckon with."

By Chris Farah
Daily Sports Writer
Crack.
This was the piercing sound of the
starting gun Saturday as the Michigan
women's track team competed against
Indiana and Michigan State in the first
meet of the indoor season.
It is also the drug you'd have to be
taking if the ice-cold temperatures did-
n't give you second thoughts about hik-
ing to a meet inside Michigan's well-
ventilated indoor track facilities.
The Wolverines, however, were com-
peting hotly enough to bring on an early
spring thaw.
By thrashing the Hoosiers and
Spartans, Michigan also proved that it
melted away any ice left over from win-
ter break.
The Wolverines consistently placed at
or near the top in all of the field events.
Freshmen Brandi Bentley and Kenise
Brocage finished second and third in the
long jump. Bentley also placed fourth in
the triple jump, while sophomore
Stephanie Wigness came in third in the
shot put.
Perhaps the most impressive field
performance, however, came from
sophomore Nicole Forrester, who fin-
ished first in the high jump with a jump
of 1.78 meters, good enough to qualify
for the NCAA championships.

Michigan also dominated on the
track. The Wolverines received the
sprinting punch they seemed to lack last
year from Brocage and fellow freshnlan
Maria Brown, who tied for first in th.
55-meter dash. Brocage seemed, to be
showing up everywhere as she also
placed third in the 200-meter dash.
Junior Tania Longe finished first in the
55-meter hurdles despite a back injury.
Sophomore Katie McGregor set the
tone for the Michigan distance runners
with two gutsy come-from-behind vic-
tories in the mile and the 800-meter
run.
Following her example, freshmen
Lisa Ouellet and Elizabeth Kampfe als*
placed first in their respective events,
the 600- and 3,000-meter runs.
Their opening performance has
marked the Wolverines as competitors
who have the ability to win in impres-
sive fashion, and head coach James
Henry feels they have a chance to fulfill
that potential.
"We're out of the block, we got a
good start, but we have a ways to go " {
Henry said. "We've got to stay health'
If we can still stay at full strength, we
can be even better than we are now.
"I still expect us to overachieve.
We're a better team than last year when
we overachieved, so let's continue to
overachieve and see what happens."

FILE PHOTO/Daily
The Michigan women's indoor track and field team rolled over Indiana and
Michigan State on Its way to a dominating victory in the Wolverines' first meet of
the season.

New England, Green Bay advance to Super Bowl in Big Easy

FOXBORO, Mass. (AP) - Out of
the fog, then out of the dark, the New
England Patriots are in the Super Bowl.
Shrugging off an 11-minute power
failure at Foxboro Stadium, the Patriots
won the AFC Championship 20-6 last
night, making the Jacksonville Jaguars
look like the second-year team they
are.
New England did it with defense,
coming up with three turnovers in the
final four minutes to halt Jacksonville's
attempt at a comeback.

A week ago, the Patriots played
through a heavy fog to rout the
Pittsburgh Steelers. In two weeks, they
get a chance to snap the AFC's 12-year
losing streak in the Super Bowl when
they face the Green Bay Packers in
New Orleans.
"I'm just very excited for the oppor-
tunity," said coach Bill Parcells, who
gets a shot at a third NFL title. "These
players have given me everything."
Parcells, 3-0 in conference title
games, gets to improve his 2-0 record

in Super Bowls; he won as coach of the
New York Giants after the 1986 and
1990 seasons.
Parcells is only the second coach to
take two different teams to the Super
Bowl and would be the first to win with
different teams.
In Green Bay, Lambeau Field and
tradition had beaten second-year
Carolina 30-13 in the NFC champi-
onship game to reach the Super Bowl
for the first time since Lombardi's
Packers beat Dallas in the "Ice Bowl"
PARADISE
Continued from Page 38
wit. Partly because he isn't afraid to
voice his opinions.
And he certainly has an opinion
about Michigan.
"Michigan is Michigan," Frieder
said. "Michigan is a great, great
place. I love Michigan. I love
Michigan. I love the University of
Michigan."
Surprised?
You might think that he holds a
grudge against the school, based on
what happened in 1989.
Not so.
He holds no grudges. Except, of
course, one - against
Schembechler.
"The only thing I've got against
Michigan is the way that they treated
me when I was completely honest
with them about my intentions,"
Frieder said. "But that was just one
man that did that."
While at Michigan, Frieder wasn't
a Schembechler fan, and he isn't one
today, either.
In fact, he thinks that his good
friend, Steve Fisher, was fortunate to
succeed him as coach.
Because Schembechler originally
wanted somebody else for the job.
"I would have been devastated if
Steve wouldn't have gotten the job

29 years ago.
The Packers even got coach Mike
Holmgren to utter the words "Super
Bowl" for the first time this season.
"All of us were dreaming about this
game all week. It was like we were
being tormented," said Reggie White.
"Now we can go home and have pleas-
ant dreams."
This team, now 15-3, will head to
New Orleans as the favorite over New
England to give the NFC its 13t*
straight title.
when I left," Frieder said. "I think
Steve did what he had to do in the
tournament (in 1989) to get the job.
Because Schembechler's intentions
were to get rid of anybody associat-
ed with Frieder. It got to the point
where, politically, he could not do
that. He had to give the job to Steve
because of how Steve handled th
situation."
Whether these were
Schembechler's intentions or not is
debatable. There certainly has been
no public knowledge of a rift
between Fisher and Schembechler.
Despite his feud with
Schembechler, Frieder remains a
Michigan fan in almost everything
related to the university.
"I follow the University oo
Michigan," he said. "I'll watch them
in every-football, basketball game I
can watch. Chills still go down my
spine when they play the fight song.
I know I'm a part of that tradition.
No matter what Schembechler
once said and some eight years, 200
games, and thousands of nagging
questions later, Bill Frieder is still a
Michigan man.
Well, at least in spirit.
- Barry Sollenberger can bA
reached over e-mail at
jsol@umich.edu.
He'll return from Tempe next
Monday.

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Student leaders accompany visiting middle school
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