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March 10, 1997 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1997-03-10

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I

2A - The Michigan Daily - Monday, March 10, 1997

NATION/WoRLD

I I

Lake confirmation hearings begin

+ Fierce clash expected
between Lake and
rival Sen. Shelby
Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - One of
Washington's nastiest political dramas
will break into the open tomorrow
when hearings begin before the Senate
lItelligence Committee on the nomina-
tion of former White House national
security adviser Anthony Lake as direc-
tor of the Central Intelligence Agency.
-Lake will face off against his chief
tormentor, Sen. Richard Shelby, (R-
Ala.), who chairs the committee. The
two have little in common.
Lake is. a Harvard graduate (magna

cum laude) and has ties to Cambridge,
Princeton (where he earned a doctorate
degree), the State Department, the
Carnegie Endowment and Mount
Holyoke. He is a member of the country's
Northeastern elite but never has been
elected to anything more exalted than the
Worthington, Mass., Planning Board.
Shelby of Tuscaloosa, Ala., is a grad-
uate of the University of Alabama and
its law school and has served in the
Senate for more than 10 years. A
Democrat who was punished for oppos-
ing the president's 1993 budget plan, he
changed his party affiliation and is now
a Republican chairman who is in posi-
tion for some payback.
The two sides in this political drama
have been preparing for the collision for

months, fighting over FBI files, trading
accusations, spinning facts for the media
and dealing out leaks like poker cards. It
has turned into that rare Washington set
piece, a test of wills between two men
backed by powerful partisan forces -
the Democratic administration and the
Republican Congress.
The latest twist in the ongoing con-
frontation between the White House and
Shelby came yesterday, in response to a
new report about alleged efforts by
China to funnel illegal campaign contri-
butions into U.S. politics last year.
According to the report, staff members
at the National Security Council, which
Lake headed, were informed by the
Justice Department of an FBI investiga-
tion into the allegations concerning

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4- 6 PM
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WED., MARCH 19
4 - 6 PM
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WED., MARCH 26
4- 6 PM
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WED., APRIL 2
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GRADUATE STUDENTS
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ALL PRESENTATIONS ARE FREE TO THE PUBLIC..
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China, but President Clinton and other
senior White House officials were not
briefed. Shelby said he will raise the
issue during Lake's confirmation hear-
ings to find out whether a breakdown in
the system kept the president in the dark.
All this has earned the Lake nomina-
tion comparisons to the ugly battle over
Sen. John Tower's failed 1989 nomina-
tion by President Bush to become sec-
retary of defense.
To stave off a similar fate, Lake has
successfully courted the old boys' net-
work at the CIA, dining with retired
spies, bringing others into the White
House for private chats, promising CIA
alumni that he will stay at the agency for
four years and take an active manage-
ment role in its espionage operations.
CUTS
Continued from Page 3A
the University has made no definite
plans toward privatization.
"There have been some studies to
look at certain jobs where we could
outsource the work to private firms
at a lower cost, but we haven't made
any decision to do that yet," Trester
said.
"Outsourcing has been very popu-
lar in the hospital industry for
decades. It's a good option, but we
haven't yet made a decision," Trester
said.
But Wilkerson said patient needs are
frequently overlooked under private
care, as they tend to be superseded by
financial concerns.
"I think that private hospitals spend
more on administrative costs and less
on caregiving," Wilkerson said.
"There is good evidence to suggest
that outsourcing would have a nega-
tive impact on patients."
Yet Trester, who said outsourcing has
been discussed by administrators for
several years, maintained that the bud-
get cuts will not diminish the level of
patient care.
"Our No. I priority is to maintain the
level of patient satisfaction and patient
care, so we'll do nothing to jeopardize
that," Trester said.
Trester also said budget cuts will
not affect the quality of the Medical
School.
"We wouldn't have the hospital if
not for the Medical School so it is cru-
cial and won't be affected," Trester
said. "We're going to continue to edu-
cate the students the same way we
have."
The University budget cuts coincide
with a nationwide trend of increased
consolidation in the health care indus-
try - called "managed care" - in
which a small number of giant, for-
profit health care corporations provide
insurance for a majority of the popula-
tion.
Between 60 and 70 percent of
insured individuals are currently
covered under some type of managed
care, according to a Physicians for
Quality Health Care brochure.
Despite some advocates' views
about detached bureaucracy in the
industry, Michael Harrison, associate
director of marketing and planning at
the University Medical Center's pub-
lic relations department, said the
University is closely involved with
the community, especially through
women's health and children's pro-
grams.
"The University Hospital is very
much involved with the community
through a lot of different programs,"
Harrison said.
But Wilkerson said she is disap-

pointed that the University is follow-
ing industry trends instead of pro-
viding leadership in reforming the
system.
"I feel that the most important
thing is that we have to work togeth-
er to develop a health care system in
which cutthroat competition is not
the way we determine how health
care will be distributed," Wilkerson
said.
"The University should be a leader
not only scientifically and clinically,
but also in the area of providing health
care for the population as a whole,'
Wilkerson said.
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Gulf War Syndrome
may be catagious
IRVINE, Calif. - A number of
medical professionals, who say they
have become ill while treating
Persian Gulf War veterans, claim the
mysterious disease afflicting tens of
thousands of soldiers is contagious
and could pose a public health
threat.
Doctors, nurses, laboratory
researchers, as well as others who come
in casual contact with Gulf War veter-
ans, say they have contracted the same
symptoms - fatigue, fever, aches,
rashes and respiratory problems -that
are generally associated with "Gulf
War Syndrome."
Government investigators as well as
some prominent scientists express deep
skepticism about such theories and
they find little evidence to support the
claim that Gulf War illnesses are conta-
gious.
But despite the failure to find
favor with official Washington and
colleagues, many remain convinced

Ohio River crests inundate midwest
FALMOUTH, Ky. - More than a week has passed since the Flood of '97 began
with a violent weather system that also brought deadly tornadoes to Arkansas and
Mississippi. High water in West Virginia, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee
has increased the death toll to 58 and caused millions of dollars in damages.w
The Ohio River, which crested in Louisville on Friday at almost 16 feet abbve
flood stage, has since dropped more than 2 feet to 36.6 feet yesterday. A storm y
terday was expected to dump an additional inch of rain, but forecasters said it
would have little effect on the floodwaters.
Still, this slow-motion disaster is far from over, with waters still rising in down-
stream towns. The Ohio is expected to crest tomorrow in Evansville, Ind.,
Wednesday in Mount Vernon, Ind., and Friday in Paducah, Ky.
"It's just a big, old long crest;' said Randy Griggs of the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers.
In Old Shawneetown, Ill., where the Ohio has risen nearly 2 feet and is expect-
ed to crest Thursday, volunteers and emergency crews were busy sandbagging to
plug holes in the main levee.
Smithland, Ky., population 500, is surrounded by water that is waist-high and"
ing, with a crest expected Friday. Schoolchildren helped fill sandbags until my
night Saturday to increase the height of the town's flood wall to 5 feet.

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.R r ."..i d : :h:k'
Israeli warplanes
raid South Lebanon
MARJAYOUN, Lebanon - Israeli
warplanes blasted suspected positions
of the Iranian-backed Hezbollah guer-
rilla group in southern Lebanon yester-
day, hours after a soldier was wounded
in an ambush, security officials said.
Two Israeli fighter jets swooped
down on a mountainous area between
the towns of Mashgara and Ein el-
Tineh in the eastern sector of an Israeli-
occupied border enclave in south
Lebanon, the Lebanese officials said.
The jets staged three sorties, drop-
ping two missiles each time, said the
officials, speaking on customary con-
dition of anonymity.
The area is believed to be used by
Hezbollah as a launching base for oper-
ations against Israeli soldiers and their
militia allies.
A Hezbollah spokesperson in
Mashgara, which faces the occupied
enclave, would not say whether there
were any guerrilla casualties.
An Israeli army spokesman con-

that the cause of gulf war illness is an
infectious microbe, either native to
the Middle Eastr or produced by
Iraq's infamous biological weapons
program. Whatever the cause, they
say, it is spreading.
Ibuprofen reduces
risk of Alzheimer's
The risk of developing Alzheimer's
disease can be reduced by as much as
60 percent by frequent consumption of
the common anti-inflammatory drug
ibuprofen over two years or longer, a
massive study to be released today has
shown.
Even shorter use could reduce t e
risk by as much as 35 percent, a tel
from Johns Hopkins University and the
National Institute on Aging reports in
the journal Neurology.
Earlier studies had hinted that ibupro-
fen, commonly known as Advil, Motrin
or Nuprin, and other anti-inflammatory
drugs might delay the onset. of
Alzheimer's, but this is the largest study
to date and perhaps the most convinc-
ing, experts said. - ,

firmed that an Israeli soldier was light-
ly wounded Sunday from mortar shells
and anti-tank missiles in Rihan.
The Israeli air strike came neady
four hours after Hezbollah gueril9
hit an Israeli mechanized patrol with
Sagger missiles and rocket-propelled
grenades in the village of Rihan,-six
miles north of Marjayoun.
Scientists den
cloning of chid
LONDON - A Belgian scient'
yesterday denied a London newspa
report that his fertility center acciden-
tally produced the world's first human
clone, a 4-year-old boy now living in
southern Belgium.
Dr. Robert Schoysman, head of the
Van Helmont Hospital near Brussels,
'said he was "amazed and irritated" by
The Sunday Times of London report
about the work of his fertility center.
He said the child was born after his
mother underwent in vitro fertilizatig
- Compiled from Daily wire reports.

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