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February 27, 1997 - Image 18

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The Michigan Daily, 1997-02-27

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16 - The Michigan Daily Weeked1 Magazine - Thursday, February 27, 1997

TV HIATUS
Continued from Page 10B
uct pas an opportunity to score based on its mer-
its, said NBC Entertainment President Warren
Littlefield.
The same thinking inspired ABC to tem-
porarily move "Ellen" to Tuesdays in order to
give "Arsenio" a test run following one of the
network's hottest programs, "The Drew Carey
Show." NBC will use "ER's" slot to preview
"Prince Street," a drama about undercover
cops, then move the show to Wednesdays while
airing a three-part "Law & Order" on Thursday
night.

With "Murphy Brown" on hiatus, CBS will
see how well "Cybill" fares in that key 9 p.m.
Monday position. "Everybody Loves
Raymond" - a critical favorite
that is struggling on Fridays -
also gets an opportunity to try to
live up to its name on Mondays at
8:30 p.m., following "Cosby."
In addition to "Raymond,"
"Relativity," "Dangerous Minds"
and several other borderline series
- whose renewal prospects may
hinge on their performance this
spring - will get tryouts in different time peri-
ods. With a lack of breakout hits creating few
clear-cut choices, programmers are looking for

patterns and any signs of ratings potential
before May, when they set their schedules for
next season.
Before the audience absorbs all
the shaking and moving of March,
in fact, the ground will shift again.
April will bring a half-dozen more
new series, including Aaron
Spelling's exploration of another
Southern California zipcode,
"Pacific Palisades," on Fox, and a
"Home Improvement" spinoff on
ABC titled "Father's Day."
Notably, prime-time leader NBC will tinker
with its schedule just as much as needier com-
petitors. The network doesn't want to fall vic-

tim to standing pat too long with a winning
hand - an approach that ultimately led to its
slide from first to third place in the early 1990s,
before "ER" and "Friends" led its comeback.
NBC must also consider the big shoes it must
fill after next season, presumed to be the last
for "Seinfeld."
"I will also be experiencing 'ER' withdrawal,"
Littlefield said. "You can't please everybody all
the time. We are taking a risk, but it's a risk we
have to take in our position. We remember what
happened (after) the '80s."
Littlefield also offered a Terminator-esque reas-
surance to "ER" fans lamenting its coming
absence: "The important thing is to say, 'We'll be
back."'

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LEADERS
Continued from Page 12B
ous involved with these issues. As col-
lege students, we should have some
sense of idealism and activism still
embedded in our minds. Unfortunately,
MSA and other campus leaders often
turn into a bunch of kids playing poli-
tics.
Stress the word "playing" here. In the
last few weeks, student leaders look like

little kids mocking the "adults" in
Washington. Rose's planner might be
necessary for her busy schedule - but
the fact that she, as she explained, went
to a seminar where they used Franklin
planners does not justify a $130 pur-
chase with MSA money. Rose has taken
a lesson from government in
Washington: You can use public money
for cushy expenditures that benefit
nobody but yourself.
Probir Mehta's actions whistle to the
tune of $500, which he improperly allo-
cated to a student group. Perhaps it was a
mere oversight, or perhaps he saw noth-
ing wrong with the action. Or perhaps he
took a lesson in "playing politics" from
Washington - when you have power,
you can use it however the hell you want.
CR President Nicholas Kirk's
impeachment last week for forging a
press pass was indeed a curious situa-
tion. Frankly, I'm sad to see Kirk go.
Not only was he one of the only CRs to
treat me with respect, he was
unabashedly Republican. He didn't
tone down the real GOP agenda simply
for the sake of politics.
But like Newt Gingrich, he got
caught doing something unethical. Also
like Newt Gingrich, he got caught by a
group of people who were out to get him
for a long time. Unlike Newt Gingrich,
he didn't have all-star legal advice and a
group of colleagues who would over-
look his wrongdoing.
It's a shame, all these young people
playing politics. At least they could play
something fun. Like columnist or
something.
- Reach Dean at deanc aumtzich.edu.

-Al lwmw %NAW"'

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