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February 18, 1997 - Image 9

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-02-18

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i

MEN'S
BASKETBALL
No. 17 LOUISVILLE 75,
South Florida 64
No. 1 KANSAS 79,
Missouri 67
WOMEN'S
BASKETBALL
No. 23 GEORGE
WASHWING~TON86.

Georgetown 62
No. 8 TENN. 64,
No. 15 Vanderbilt 59
NO. CAROLINA ST. 84,
No. 4 No. Carolina 77
No. 9 TEXAS 71,
Nebraska 70
PRO
HOCKEY

Montreal 4,
NY ISLANDERS 1
New Jersey 2,
NY RANGERS 2
Dallas 2,
LOS ANGELES 1
Detroit 3,
TAMPA BAY 3
PRO
BASKETBALL

WASHINGTON 95,
Milwaukee 93
CLEVELAND 108,
New Jersey 101
INDIANA 105,
Toronto 103
CHARLOTTE 124,
Orlando 110
HOUSTON 127,

Tuesday
February 18, 1997

Aana an +rfl

MICHIGAN SPORTS INFORMATION
Michigan's Tania Longe will have a lot to live up to at this weekend's Big Ten
championship. Longe placed first in the heptathion at the 1996 outdoor Big Tens.
Lk B
,L BTB

Sloan nets humanitarian award
Service included
SHARE, DARE
programs
By Jim Rose
Daily Sports Writer
Michigan senior hockey player lake
Sloan was named the winner of the 1997
.F.':> Hockey Humanitarian Award, given
annually by a Boston-based group to
"college hockey's finest citizen."
Sloan is the second recipient of the
award, which the Hockey Humanitarian
4 Y Foundation gives "to honor positive role
models for today's youth."
Sloan, a defenseman and assistant co-
captain for the Wolverines, has received
attention in recent weeks for his off-ice
contributions to the community.
His activities include the SMARE
Program, in which he has read to Ann
Arbor elementary school children. He
was also a participant in the DARE
program, speaking against drugs and
violence.
Sloan served as co-chair of an
October 1996 fundraiser which helped
raise more than $10,000 for paralyzed
Boston University hockey player Travis
Roy. Part of the proceeds also went to
s:<. help University of Michigan Medical
Center patient with spinal cord injuries.
He says his most rewarding activities,
however, have been the trips with his
k.sysyteammates to visit sick youngsters at.
,. C.S. Mott's Children's Hospital.
"That's one of the most gratifying
trips" Sloan says. "I can't say that I
k' enjoy it, really, but it definitely puts you
in a humble state. It just puts everything
' in perspective when you see others less
fortunate than you, and it's just a way to
give something back:'
Members of the Hockey
Humanitarian Foundation will present
Sloan with the award before Friday
FILE PHOTO/Daily night's 7 p.m. hockey game at Yost Ice
Michigan defenseman Blake Sloan became the second recipient of the Hockey Humanitarian Award. Sloan was recognized for Arena.
work including an Oct. 1996 fundraiser for paralyzed Boston University hockey player Travis Roy. See SLOAN, Page 10

t Rhonda McGe
othe Daily
Ask not what your team can do for
you, but what you can do for your team.
This is one philosophy Tania Longe of
rthe Michigan women's track team has
followed throughout her collegiate track
career.
Longe, known for her strong perfor-
-mtance in the heptathlon and pentathlon,
tone of the nation's finest multi-event
,etes.
.She has consistently stepped up her
~performance to help bring Michigan
success. In .1996, she finished ninth at
the outdoor NCAA championships in
the heptathlon. She also placed first in
,the outdoor heptathlon and second in the
indoor pentathlon at the Big Ten cham-
pionships last year.
What are the ingredients that go into
making this successful athlete? The hard

work ethic, high level of confidence and
mental toughness that she has developed
over her young career are big parts of her
success. As the 1997 Big Ten champi-
onships approaches this weekend, Longe
will draw from these strengths to aid her
in her performance.
Even though she is recovering from a
nagging back injury Michigan coach
James Henry still considers Longe a
serious threat to her opponents.
"Tania is an extremely tough competi-
tor and will not let her back injury hold
her back in her performance,' Henry
said. " I expect her to step it up and put in
a good showing with the rest of her
teammates"'
Longe has never had much of a prob-
lem dealing with the pressure, which
inevitably followed her success - per-
haps another reason she is such a strong
See LONGE, Page 10

I
1

Blue swimmers' Big Ten streak in jeopardy

By Afshin Mohamadi
Daily Sports Writer
The last time a team other than
Michigan won the Big Ten champi-
onship in women's swimming, the cast
of "Beverly Hills, 90210" was still in

elementary school.
If Michigan can
win this weekend's
Big Ten champi-
onship in
Indianapolis, the
Wolverines will
have captured the
conference title for
the 11th consecutive
year.
Sure, that streak

fl teGee4a
may not be as

games-played streak, but no team in
Big Ten history has had that long of a
run.
While this may seem impressive to
most, Michigan coach Jim Richardson
does not put much stock in it.
"Honestly it doesn't mean anything,"
Richardson said. "We try to simply go
there and swim the best we can."
This season's championship meet may
be the toughest in years for Michigan,
which has had lackluster showings in its
recent meets, including a loss to
Northwestern two weekends ago..
Over the past 11 seasons, the
Wolverines have compiled a dual-meet
record of 59-3 against conference oppo-
nents. However, since one of those three
losses came in Michigan's last meet,

there is reason to believe that the
Wolverines could be in for a run for
their money this weekend.
Richardson said, no matter the out-
come, the Big Ten championships is not
the most important meet of the year.
"Anytime you go into (the Big Tens),
the meet is certainly important," he
said. "But we look at it as a stepping
stone to the NCAA."
A LITTLE R&R: Last weekend was
the calm before the storm for the
Wolverines.
Richardson gave the Wolverines a
weekend to relax, with a light workout
Saturday morning the only time they
were in the pool.
"We tried to get some of the swimmers
the rest they needed," Richardson said.

The swimmers welcomed the break
but found being outside of the pool a lit-
tle uncomfortable.
The rest "was nice, but it was kind
of weird to sit there and watch a
race," senior captain Anne Kampfe
said in reference to the predoniinant-
ly high-school Michigan Open meet
held at the Canham Natatorium last
weekend.
The relaxation ended yesterday, as
the Wolverines worked out in prepara-
tion for the Big Ten championships.
Today, the swimmers will practice
when their class schedules allow, then
leave for Indianapolis. They will use
Wednesday to get accustomed to the
pool there before the three-day event
See STREAK, Page 10

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