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January 22, 1997 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-01-22

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2- The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, January 22, 1997

NATION/WORLD

Leads to Cosby
killer run dry

Loa Angeles Tunes
LOS ANGELES - The search for
Ennis Cosby's killer suffered a serious
setback yesterday when Los Angeles
homicide detectives concluded that two
men detained as possible witnesses
were drifters who had nothing to con-
tribute to their investigation.
Authorities said they were convinced
that one o'f the two men interviewed
Monday evening was the "possible wit-
ness" seen by a security guard near the
scene of the murder early last Thursday
on a darkened road above Bel-Air west
of Los Angeles.
But that man, who one officer
described as a "dead ringer" for the com-
posite drawing of the witness, persuaded
detectives that he had only been enjoying
the view of Los Angeles' lights from a
vantage point high above the city. He
had no useful information about the
shooting that took place nearby as Cosby
changed a flat tire, police said.
The man's companion also had no
knowledge of the killing of entertain-
ment icon Bill Cosby's son, police said.
The findings left police with just one

known person who is believed to have
seen the killer and without another wit-
ness they badly hoped could help them.
That witness is a 47-year-old woman
who told police she had come to the
scene to aid Cosby and provided a
description of the alleged killer.
"For now," one senior officer said yes-
terday, "we're just waiting for a break."
As police in Los Angeles were left
scrambling for a breakthrough, mean-
while, a Los Angeles woman and her
alleged accomplice were in custody in
New York yesterday, facing charges that
they tried to extort up to $40 million
from Cosby's father.
Although the alleged extortion plot
extended until two days after the mur-
der, authorities said there is no apparent
connection between Ennis Cosby's
shooting and the attempted blackmail
of Bill Cosby.
The federal government charged that
Autumn Jackson, 22, and Jose Medina,
54, threatened to go to the tabloid
media with Jackson's allegation that she
is Cosby's illegitimate daughter unless
he paid them millions of dollars.

KING
Continued from Page 1.
lence in society. Young people today
have realistic fears, King said. "At 10,
12, 11 years old, some of them wonder
if they're going to live to see tomor-
row."
During the small dinner gathering
later in the evening, King greeted
students and addressed their ques-
tions in a more personal setting.
After the meal of grilled chicken and
salmon, the group of students
exchanged thoughts on prominent
black leaders, affirmative action and
King's life growing up in the shadow
of his father.
King, who was 10 years old when
his father was assasinated, said he did-
n't fully realize how much his father
meant to the nation until after he was
killed.
"I didn't know that it was something
special and unique that he was doing,'
King said. "It was probably when he
was killed and all the people came to
my home that I realized.'
Participants said they were hon-
ored to meet with King on a personal
level.
"He was great," said Dentistry
first-year student Scott Christian.
"I'm just glad to have the opportuni-
ty to come and experience something
like this. I think everyone in here has
learned something from what he
said."

FIRE
Continued from Page 1
had minimal smoke damage" he said.
"We did however lose several items
that we provide for students including
course guides, transfer forms and
several other useful information pam-
phlets. We also lost computers that
were extremely valuable," he said.
The estimated damages total more
than $100,000, Hall said.
Wallin said he sorted through the
mess yesterday.
"My wife and I have been going
through much of the damaged goods
taking inventory for the University
and personal items," Wallin said.
"Its really devastating when some-
thing like this happens. Nineteen
years of work in the same office all
gone. I had all of my course materials
including general questions,
midterms and finals on my computer
that were all destroyed," Wallin said
last night.
"I also lost all of my books which
were a total of over 300. Fortunately,
I kept a number of my materials at
home."'
Wallin said he does not believe he
was targeted intentionally
"I can't actually imagine an indi-
vidual or group who I have ever been
affiliated in anyway doing this to
me." Wallin said.
"I never thought that I had any ene-
mies, whether it be fellow employees,
students or residents of the communi-
ty. I am a pretty friendly guy," he
said.
"I believe it was simply a random,
senseless act of vandalism.
Wallin also was upset about the
number of personal items that were
lost.
"After 19 years in that office it
really became a part of my home. I
had paintings, pictures of my children
and my wife that I treasured. All of
them are gone," Wallin said.
"I would estimate the monetary
value that I have lost to be over
$10,000," he said.
"However, you cannot put a price
on personal items I have lost and that
is what is truly sad about the situa-
tion,"

,n.Y.
SNATIONAL EPRAT;
House votes to punish speaker Gmgrich
WASHINGTON - The House yesterday voted overwhelmingly to reprimand
House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) and order him to pay an unprecedented
$300,000 penalty, the first time in the House's 208-year history it has disciplined a
speaker for ethical wrongdoing.
The ethics case and its resolution leaves Gingrich with little leeway for fu
personal controversies, House Republicans said. Exactly one month ago, Gingh
admitted that he had brought discredit to the House and broken its rules by failing
to ensure that financing for two projects would not violate federal tax law and by
giving the House ethics committee false information.
"Newt has done some things that have embarrassed House Republicans and
embarrassed the House," said Rep. Peter Hoekstra (R-Mich.). "If (the voters) see
more of that, they will question our judgment."
House Democrats are likely to continue to press other ethics charges against
Gingrich, and the Internal Revenue Service is looking into matters related to the
case that came to an end yesterday.
The 395-to-28 vote closes a tumultuous chapter that began Sept. 7, 19k,
when former representative Ben Jones (D-Ga.) then running against Gingr ,
filed an ethics complaint against the then-GOP whip.

Fell

New drug cuts risks
from bypass surgery
CHICAGO -An experimental new
drug given to heart bypass patients
before and during surgery can signifi-
cantly reduce the risk of deadly com-
plications, researchers say.
The drug, Acadesine, was tested
from 1990-94, and an analysis of those
studies found a 26-percent reduction in
deaths, heart attacks and strokes associ-
ated with bypass surgery in the first
four days after the operation.
"This is the first drug ... ever shown
to reduce serious complications after
heart surgery even though we've been
doing these surgeries for 30 years,"said
Dr. Dennis Mangano, director of the
Multicenter Study of Perioperative
Ischemia Research Group in San
Francisco.
Mangano, whose analysis of the
drug appears in today's Journal of the
American Medical Association, said its
use would spare 16,000 patients from
death or further injury worldwide each
year. An estimated 800,000 bypass

operations are performed annually.
The research was paid for in part by
the manufacturer of the drug, Gensia
Pharmaceuticals Inc. of San Diego. A
Gensia spokesperson said development
of the drug is on hold.
Democrats to refus
foreign contributions
WASHINGTON - Trying to
improve its tarnished image, the
Democratic National Committee
announced yesterday it would no
longer accept money from people or
companies with foreign ties and would
limit contributions from labor unions
and wealthy benefactors.
The party also listed steps it said
would prevent unseemly characters
from gaining access to the president
and vice president through political
receptions at the White House and vice
presidential residence. Separately, the
Clinton administration announced
efforts of its own to conduct more thor-
ough background checks on people
invited into the White House.

Mike Fair, Sophomore, University of Michigan, Pre-Med Major, Four Year Scholarship Winner

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AROUNDTHE V
Chechnya's leaders,
people disagree on
independence
GROZNY, Russia - Back in the
Kremlin, Russian leaders vow never to
let Chechnya secede. On the muddy,
bomb-cratered streets of Grozny, the
people of the Chechen capital feel they
already have.
They seeMonday's elections for a
new president and parliament as a fit-
ting conclusion to an independence
drive, something earned in 20 months
of fierce guerrilla resistance and vali-
dated by the final withdrawal of the
Russian army only three weeks ago.
Ramzan, a traffic cop, hasn't been
paid since June. But he's out every day
directing cars through the pulverized
city in the belief that his next paycheck
will come from a free Chechnya, which
Muslim separatists call Ichkeria.
"When we become independent,
then the Ichkeria government will be
able to pay me,' says Ramzan, who
gave only the one name.
Chechnya's formal status remains a
thorny issue to be hashed out by politi-

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THE BLACK STUDENT UNION AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
HOSTS
A LECTURE IN OBSERVANCE OF MLK JR. DAY
FEATURING
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AUTHOR, ACTIVIST, COMEDIAN, NUTRITIONIST,
AND ANTI-DRUG COUNSELOR
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cians, diplomats and mapmakers.
People like Ramzan, however, are confi-
dent that independence is coming soon.
Up in his spartan office in the middle
of the devastated capital, Grozs
mayor says he, too, is certain tat
Chechnya will no longer be part of
Russia after the elections.
Korean pres. agrees
to open Assembly
SEOUL, South Korea - In stunning
concessions, President Kim Young Sam
agreed yesterday to reopen the Naticl
Assembly to rewrite his party's reviled
revisions of labor and national security
laws and suspended arrest warrants for
leaders of the resulting protest strikes
that have cost the South Korean econo-
my more than $3 billion.
Kim's concessions, made after he
reversed himself and agreed to meet
with the opposition, were expected tem-
porarily to defuse the worst politicalcri-
sis of Kim's term and win him back e
critical support of the middle class h .
- Compiled from Daily wire reports.

BIO ANTHROPOLOGY 161
BUDDHIST STUDIES 220
CHEMISTRY 130
CHEMISTRY 215
ECONOMICS 101
ECONOMICS 102
ENGLISH 313
FINANCE 310
GEOL SCI 102
GEOL SCI 107
HISTORY 111
LINGUISTICS 210
NRE 470/ECON 370
PHYSICS 125
PHYSICS 126
PHYSICS 242
POLL SCI 140
PSYCHOLOGY 111
PSYCHOLOGY 330
PSYCHOLOGY 340
PSYCHOLOGY 350
PSYCHOLOGY 360
PSYCHOLOGY 370
PSYCHOLOGY 380

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