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April 22, 1997 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-04-22

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LOCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, April 22, 1997 -

eBollinger tackles new, old obstacles in first months of presidency

BOLLINGER
Continued from Page 1
Bollinger said. "Academic quality and excellence are
really the things I am most interested in."
The president's challenges extend from the operat-
ing rooms in University Hospitals to the basketball
team in Crisler Arena.
Shortly after he took office, the Athletic Department
admitted to committing two NCAA violations for its
involvement with Detroit booster Ed Martin. Bollinger
recently hired a private law firm to internally investigate
press allegations about the basketball program.
The new president also took action regarding anoth-
er controversial issue -- salary packages for top admin-
istrators.
In reaction to controversy over secret salary deals
made between former President James Duderstadt and
several executive officers, Bollinger asked the regents
4t their February meeting for an endorsement of a
pompensation plan for executive officers.
Yet for Bollinger, one of the biggest obstacles is not
paying his executive officers, but filling vacancies left
as Duderstadt's appointees depart.
"There are an unusual number of extremely diffi-
-cult and complex situations that have arisen,"

Bollinger said. "The matter of building back up the
administration and finding the right people to fill
those positions, both have made things quite difficult."
Two weeks ago, Machen announced that he does not
plan to continue as provost after his term ends in August,
leaving the second-high-
est position at the
University up for grabs. W ,'re Mal
"This week I hope to
announce an advisory prog essi
committee to help me in
looking for a new Oft areas
provost," Bollinger said.
"I hope we can fill that
position in the next two addressed2"
to four months'
There are already two - Regent Shirley
major search committees (R-Battle
in progress for the posi- _(R-Battk_
tions of chief financial

UJ
ii

ducting a search for a new general counsel to replace
Elsa Cole, who stepped down in March. In addition to
the other positions. Bollinger said he is also looking
for someone to fill a "kind of chief of staff" role in the
administration.
Despite heavy obsta-
cles, and the occasional
king student protest,
tBollinger's presidency
has drawn accolades
from many in the
P University community.
imwould give
(Bollinger's presidency)
an A+," said Regent
Olivia Maynard (D-
Mc Fee Flint). "Obviously there
are a lot of tough issues
Creek) out there. It's been a
tough couple of months.
He does it all with openness and a wish to dialogue."
Regent Shirley McFee (R-Battle Creek) said she is
happy with how the presidency operates.
"We're making progress in a lot of the areas that need
to be addresscd' MleFee said. "I'm very hopeful that we
will be able to complete the searches expeditiously."

Appeals court
rejects Baker case

officer and executive vice president for medical
affairs.
"For the CFO and EVPMA positions, there is a very
high probability they will be filled by early to mid-
summer," Bollinger said.
Bollinger said he plans to wait until fall before con-

Court denies
government's request
to hear charges
From Staff and Wire Reports
An appeals court has rejected the
government's request to hear charges
against Jake Baker, a former University
student accused of breaking the law by
sending computer messages describing
the rape and torture of women.
In January, a three-judge panel of the
6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in a
2-1 decision rejected the government
indictment, which said the e-mail mes-
sages amounted to illegally transmitted
threats.
The full court of at least 15 judges
referred the Baker case back to the
original panel.
That panel last week reaffirmed its
decision that Baker did not actually
threaten the women. He described the
rape, torture and murder of women to a
correspondent on the Internet in
Ontario.
Douglas Mullkoff, an Ann Arbor-
based attorney who represents Baker,
praised the most recent court deci-
sion.
"I'm not shocked at all. I was expect-
ing for the charges to be thrown out,"
Mullkoff said. "It's impossible for me

to predict what is going to happen i
Washington, but hopefully they will
stop beating this dead horse and let hinl
go on with his life."
The dissenting opinion was writ-
ten by Judge Robert Krupansky, wh
said that the two men not only
threatened women, but intimidateq
women or young girls with "physi-
cal harm as discussed in their
plans."
Sandy Palazzolo, spokesperson fot
the U.S. Attorney's office in Detroit,
said yesterday that any decision to
appeal now rests with the solicitor geny
eral's office in Washington, D.C.
Baker was indicted after he sent 4
message Jan. 9, 1995, through a coma
puter bulletin board. The message
described the fantasized abduction and
sexual torture of a woman with the
name of a classmate, authorities said. A
Michigan alumnus read the story and
alerted University officials. w
The appeals court upheld .l$.
District Judge Avern Cohn% June 1995
dismissal of the indictment.
Baker, who could have faced e
years in prison, is now 22 and atterbs
the University of Pittsburgh, where hie
is majoring in computer science.
"1 hope this can all end. I really can't
say anything further about the matter:'
Baker said,

Voters may tackle death penalty question

DETROIT (AP) - A state lawmak-
,er says he believes he is getting close to
securing the 26 votes needed in the
Senate to allow Michigan residents to
vote on whether to restore the death
penalty 150 years after it was abolished.
"We're closer than we have ever
been," said state Sen. Doug Carl (R-
Mount Clemens), a sponsor of one of
the five resolutions before the
*egislature that would allow voters to
,ecide the question next year.
But while Carl said he is close to get-
-'4ng the two-third majority he would need
i the Senate to get the question on a

statewide ballot, he admits the question
could face a more difficult battle in the
House.
Similar proposals in previous years
have died before reaching the ballot.
A growing number of Senate
Democrats - including Minority
Leader John Cherry (D-Clio) --- are
warming to the death penalty, already
legal in 38 states.
"While I think there is some value in
Michigan's tradition of not having it, I'd
say I'm leaning towards supporting the
death penalty" Cherry said.
In a statewide poll in 1995, Lansing

polling firm EPIC/MRA found 72 per-
cent support among voters, a percent-
age consistent with other polling in
recent years, The Detroit News reported
in a story published yesterday.
"There are some crimes so heinous
in nature that justice on more than one
level requires this to be a potential
penalty," said Sen. Michael Bouchard,
a Birmingham Republican who has
reintroduced a death-penalty resolu-
tion.
But others argue that the death penal-
ty is barbaric and that innocent people
could be put to death.

'States that have the death penalty
are saying individuals can't kill, but
society can. That sends the wrong mes-
sace or at least a conflicting one,"
said Dan \Manville. an Ann Arbor attor-
ney, who specializes in prisoner-rights
eases and served three years in prison in
the mid-1 970s.

a n n w w wiw

U N I V E R 5 1,t Y 0 F M I -C H I G A N

r..r. r W i rr

V=VARSITY
C-CLUB
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thanks t

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25
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Todd Rosenbiuth
Sandra Kang
Tony Kanluen

Prizes can be claimed at the Office of Student Activities and
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be picked up by May 2 or they will be forfeited.

II I I

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Bear Stearns Congratulates

T h e C la ss o f 1 9
Welcomes The IE
Graduates To 0
Nicholas H.
Steven M. G
Thomas E. I

b.

And

following
ur Team:
Barker
oran
[ight

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Todd R. Marcy
Seth Shapiro
llan CrnrFllor

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